United Airlines Offering Immigrants Special Flights That Circle U.S. Awaiting Gaps In Travel Ban   

CHICAGO—In response to the executive order restricting entry to the United States from six majority-Muslim nations, United Airlines announced Friday that the carrier will offer immigrants and refugees special flights that continuously circle the country until gaps in the travel ban allow them to land. “We’re excited to offer numerous daily flights from Syria, Libya, Iran, Yemen, Somalia, and Sudan to a perpetual holding pattern above the Atlantic Ocean, where international travelers can enjoy a relaxing journey while waiting for a federal court to temporarily suspend the ban,” said United spokesman Karen Jennings, adding that customers attempting to flee their war-torn native countries or just visit their American relatives will be offered onboard meals and a wide array of in-flight entertainment options throughout the voyage up and down the eastern coastline, which may last anywhere from one week to several years depending on the specific terms of the ...


          Hội nghị thượng đỉnh AU chú trọng vấn đề thanh niên, hòa bình   

Hội nghị thượng đỉnh Liên minh châu Phi (AU) lần thứ 29 sẽ diễn ra trong hai ngày 3-4/7 ở thủ đô Addis-Ababa của Ethiopia, với chủ đề chính là “Vai trò của thanh niên trong tăng trưởng toàn diện và bền vững của châu lục."

Tại hội nghị lần này, ngoài chủ đề trọng tâm trên, các nguyên thủ và người đứng đầu chính phủ các nước thành viên AU cũng sẽ thảo luận về vấn đề “tự chủ tài chính”của AU trong thời gian tới.

Trước đó, các cuộc họp lần thứ 34 của Ủy ban đại diện thường trực AU (COREP) đã được tổ chức vào ngày 27-28/6 và cuộc họp Hội đồng chấp hành cấp Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao lần thứ 31 của AU cũng đã khai mạc ngày 30/6.

Ngoài mục đích phát huy những lợi thế to lớn trong việc đầu tư vào giới trẻ, Hội nghị thượng đỉnh AU lần thứ 29 cũng sẽ tập trung thảo luận và giải quyết những vấn đề liên quan hòa bình và an ninh ở châu lục. Đặc biệt là giải quyết khủng hoảng ở 2 quốc gia thành viên là Somalia và Libya, cũng như xem xét việc cải cách tổ chức lớn nhất châu lục này để phát huy hiệu quả hơn trong tương lai.


Hiện Tổng thống Rwanda Paul Kagame là Chủ tịch đương nhiệm của AU. Hội nghị thượng đỉnh AU lần thứ 29 diễn ra trong bối cảnh tỷ lệ thất nghiệp trong đội ngũ lao động trẻ ở châu Phi hiện rất cao, chiếm khoảng 30% tổng lực lượng lao động tại đây.

Đặc biệt, tình hình an ninh, trật tự tại châu lục này đang có chiều hướng phức tạp khi các tổ chức Hồi giáo cực đoan đang gia tăng các hoạt động khủng bố, nhất là Somalia, Niger, Mali, Nigeria …và nền hòa bình mong manh tại Libya, Nam Sudan.

Đặc biệt là cuộc khủng hoảng nhân đạo ở Nam Sudan được coi là tồi tệ nhất châu Phi và thế giới hiện nay với hàng trăm nghìn người có nguy cơ bị chết đói, trong đó có nhiều phụ nữ và trẻ em./.


          U.N. to Reduce Peacekeepers in Darfur Region of Sudan   
The Security Council voted to withdraw more than a third of the nearly 19,000 peacekeepers in the volatile region.
          Vaccines - Global Markets Package   

This market research report package offers a perspective on the actual market situation, trends and future outlook for vaccines in different countries around the world.

Portland, OR -- (ReleaseWire) -- 08/12/2014 -- This market research report package offers a perspective on the actual market situation, trends and future outlook for vaccines in different countries around the world. The studies provide essential market information for decision-makers including:

- Overall market for vaccines in different countries
- Market for vaccines by product type
- Forecasts and future outlook of the market
- Macroeconomic indicators

Get detailed report at: http://www.reportsandintelligence.com/vaccines-global-package-market

These market studies answer to questions such as:
- What is the size of the vaccine markets in different countries around the world?
- How are the markets divided into different types of products?
- Which products are growing fast?
- How the markets have been developing?
- How does the future look like?
- What is the potential for the markets?
- How the macroeconomic indicators look like?

Product types discussed in the studies:
Human vaccines
Veterinary vaccines

Years covered: 2006 - 2017

Countries included in the package:
Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belgium, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Senegal, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay and Vietnam

Similar report
Global Dialysis Market (Types, Products and Services, End-users and Geography): http://www.reportsandintelligence.com/dailysis-market

For more information on this press release visit: http://www.releasewire.com/press-releases/vaccines-global-markets-package-537993.htm

Media Relations Contact

Sona Padman
International Accounts Manager
Reports And Intelligence
Telephone: 617-674-4143
Email: Click to Email Sona Padman
Web: http://www.reportsandintelligence.com/


          Limited Travel Ban Becomes Effective This Evening   
As a result of Supreme Court ruling earlier this week, a limited version of the travel ban proposed by the Trump Administration goes into effect this evening (8 PM EDT, 5 PM PDT). The modified ban would impact individuals from six majority-Muslim nations: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.  In order for individuals from those nations...
          Oxfam warns that modern day land rush is forcing thousands into greater poverty   

Oxfam calls for British company to investigate the forced eviction of more than 20,000 Ugandans to make way for its plantations

Oxfam today launches a major new report highlighting the growing pace of land deals brokered around the world, often to the peril of poor communities who lose their homes and livelihoods – sometimes violently – with no prior consultation, compensation or means of appeal.

In the report Land and Power, the international agency reveals preliminary research indicating as many as 227 million hectares have been sold, leased or licensed in large-scale land deals since 2001, mostly by international investors. Lack of transparency and the secrecy that surrounds land deals makes it difficult to get exact figures but to date up to 1,100 of these deals amounting to 67 million hectares have been cross checked. Half of these deals are in Africa, and cover an area nearly the size of Germany. (1)

Oxfam warns this modern day land rush follows a drive to produce enough food for people overseas, meet damaging biofuels targets or speculate on land to make an easy profit. However, many of the deals are in fact ‘land grabs’ where the rights and needs of the people living on the land are ignored, leaving them homeless and without land to grow enough food to eat and make a living.

This is likely to get worse as the increasing demand for food, the gathering pace of climate change, water scarcity and non-food crops like biofuels compete for land. Already, nearly three billion people live in areas where demand for water outstrips supply.

Land grabs: devastating vulnerable communities

Oxfam International’s Executive Director Jeremy Hobbs said: “The unprecedented pace of land deals and the increased competition for land is leaving many of the world’s poorest people worse off. In the scramble for more land, investors are ignoring the people who currently live on the land and depend on it to survive.”

Oxfam’s report profiles the devastating effect land grabs in Uganda, South Sudan, Indonesia, Honduras and Guatemala are having on vulnerable communities. The report is part of Oxfam’s GROW campaign which aims to secure a future where everyone has enough to eat. Women, who produce up to 80 per cent of food in some poor countries, are usually most vulnerable as they have weaker land rights.

In Uganda, Oxfam’s research indicates that at least 22,500 people have lost their homes and land to make way for a British timber company, the New Forests Company. Many evictees told Oxfam how they were forcibly removed and have been left destitute, without enough food or money to send their children to school. There were court orders in force which named the company but eye-witnesses say that company workers took part in some of the evictions anyway. NFC denies that it was involved in any evictions. (2)

Evicted without consultation or compensation

Christine, a farmer in her mid 40s, who lived in Kiboga district before the Uganda land grab said: “All our plantations were cut down – we lost the banana and cassava. We lost everything we had. The company’s casual laborers would attack us – they beat and threatened people. Even now they won’t let us back in to look for the things we left behind. I was threatened – they told me they were going to beat me if we didn’t leave.”

Hobbs said: “The Uganda case clearly shows how land grabs are slipping through the net of existing safeguards which are intended to ensure the protection of vulnerable people. Thousands of people are suffering because they have been evicted without meaningful consultation or compensation.

“The New Forests Company describes itself as an ethical company, adhering to international standards. It needs to investigate these claims urgently. It’s not acceptable for companies to blame governments. They must respect the needs and rights of poor communities affected by their investment.”

Prioritize existing land use rights

Oxfam is calling for investors, governments and international organizations to prioritize putting a stop to land grabbing by fixing the current policies and regulations which all too often fail to ensure that, when investors negotiate deals, local people are consulted, treated fairly, and that all relevant international standards are respected. These include the World Bank's International Finance Corporation Performance Standards and the Forest Stewardship Council’s standards.

Governments should avoid pandering to investors’ wishes, and prioritize existing land use rights – not just where legal land title or formal ownership rights are held. Governments should recognize that women have equal rights over land and ensure that all agricultural investments benefit local communities who rely on the land to survive. While governments and companies get their house in order to stop future land grabbing, there is an urgent need to remedy the damage done by existing land grabs, including in the case of the Uganda international investment.

Flawed biofuels policies

Perverse incentives such as the flawed biofuels targets, like the EU’s target of obtaining 10 per cent of transport fuels from renewable sources by 2020, should be scrapped to curb the rush on land to meet biofuel demand.

Meanwhile, the UN’s Committee on Food Security in Rome could take an important first step when it meets in Rome next month, by adopting credible pro-poor, pro-women guidelines on land tenure.

Hobbs said: “Land investment should be good news for people in poverty but the frenetic scramble for land risks putting development in reverse. We need urgent global action so that local people with relatively little do not lose everything for the benefit of a few, and to secure a future where everyone has enough to eat.”

Read more

English
Pull quotes: 
I was threatened – they told me they were going to beat me if we didn’t leave.
Quotee's organisation: 
Farmer from Kiboga district, Uganda
Notes to editors: 
  1. This data is compiled by the Land Matrix Partnership, a coalition of academic, research and non-governmental organisations. The 227 million figure is based on information on land deals over 200 hectares from a whole range of different sources including government reports, academic research, company websites, media reports and the few contracts that are available. The coalition is currently cross checking the records of land deals it has identified.  It is calling for increased transparency among companies and governments so that the true scale of the problem can be accurately understood.
    The Land Matrix Partnership includes the International Land Coalition, the universities of Bern and Hamburg, the French research institute CIRAD, the German agency for technical cooperation, GIZ and Oxfam.
  2. The evictions took place between 2006 and 2010. One High Court order was granted on 24 August 2009 and remained valid until 18 March 2010. The other was granted on 19 June 2009 and remained in force until 2 October 2009. Both were to restrain evictions by the company.
    The New Forests Company stated that the majority of local residents had no legal right to the land, that they had left peacefully and that the process was the sole responsibility of the Ugandan National Forestry Authority.  It told Oxfam that it had brought jobs and amenities to local communities and that its activities had been approved by the Forestry Stewardship Council and International Finance Corporation.

Useful figures:

  • The global economy, which is expected to triple in size by 2050, will demand ever more scarce natural and agricultural resources
  • Palm oil has become the world’s most consumed edible oil and can be found in up to half of all packaged food and hygiene products. Production is expected to double by 2050, increasing the land area under cultivation worldwide by 24 million hectares – six times the size of the Netherlands
  • In Guatemala, eight per cent of farmers account for 78 per cent of the land in production. Of the smallholders who control the remaining land, just eight per cent are women.

Oxfam’s GROW campaign is calling for global action to fix a broken food system where 925 million people already go hungry every day. This could get worse in the face of dwindling natural resources, like land, the gathering pace of climate change and increasing food price volatility. Find out how we can help prevent this from getting worse at www.oxfam.org/grow

Contact information: 

Tricia O'Rourke, tricia.orourke@oxfaminternational.org, +44 1865 339157 or +44 7876 397915

Space: 
Space only: 
Quotee: 
Christine

           Sudan says UN troops cut shows Darfur a 'closed chapter'    
The UN Security Council's decision to cut peacekeepers in Darfur shows the conflict in Sudan's war-torn region is a "closed chapter", the foreign ministry...
          Alkollü kafadarlar ortalığı bir birine kattı   
Bursa’nın İznik ilçesinde, sahilde alkol alan iki kafadar, daha sonra serinlemek için göle girdi. Gençlerin ikisi de aynı anda sudan çıktı. Fakat alkolün etkisiyle bir birlerini fark etmeyen gençler polisi ve jandarmayı ayağa kaldırdı.Akşam...
          U.S. Criticises Sudan Human Rights   
The U.S. said on Friday it was “very concerned” about Sudan’s human rights record, which was supposed to have improved by early July in order for Washington to lift sanctions against the country.
           African Champions League group A results and standings    
June 30 (Gracenote) - Results and standings from the African Champions League Group A matches on Friday Friday, June 30 Al Merreikh (Sudan) 2 Al...
          OFAC impone multa a aseguradora AIG por violar embargo a Cuba, Irán y Sudán   
OFAC impone multa a aseguradora AIG por violar embargo a Cuba, Irán y Sudán
junio 29, 2017

Un comunicado de OFAC expresa que las violaciones de AIG concernientes a
Cuba se refieren a coberturas de seguros para envíos de mercancías desde
o hacia la isla, en 29 ocasiones, con un costo total de $3,679 dólares.
La Oficina de Control de Activos Extranjeros (OFAC, por sus siglas en
inglés) impuso una multa de $148,698 dólares a la compañía
estadounidense de seguros American Internacional Group (AIG) por violar
las sanciones económicas a Irán, Sudán y Cuba.

Un comunicado de OFAC expresa que las violaciones de AIG concernientes a
Cuba se refieren a coberturas de seguros para envíos de mercancías desde
o hacia la isla, en 29 ocasiones, con un costo total de $3,679 dólares.

AIG con sede en New York, reconoció voluntariamente que había cometido
555 violaciones aparentes a las sanciones económicas en vigor a Irán,
Sudán y Cuba, impuestas por Estados Unidos, dijo el comunicado.

Desde el 20 de noviembre de 2007, hasta el 3 de septiembre de 2012, AIG
incurrió en esas violaciones, al proveer cobertura de seguros a varios
envíos de mercancías hacia o desde esos tres países.

Esta es la tercera multa que OFAC impone en lo que va de año a empresas
o entidades estadounidenses por violar las sanciones a Cuba.

El pasado 8 de junio, una subsidiaria en Canadá de la empresa American
Honda Finance Corporation pagó una multa de $87,255 dólares para
liquidar su posible responsabilidad civil por aparentes violaciones al
embargo estadounidense a Cuba.

OFAC impuso la multa a esa compañía por financiar 13 acuerdos de
arrendamiento de vehículos a la Embajada cubana en Ottawa entre el 2011
y el 2014.

El 12 de enero, la Alianza para una Política Responsable hacia Cuba, con
sede en Tampa, acordó con OFAC pagar $10,000 dólares por violar los
reglamentos del organismo durante múltiples viajes no autorizados a
Cuba, entre el 23 de agosto del 2010 y septiembre del 2011.

(Redactado por Pablo Alfonso, con información de OFAC)

Source: OFAC impone multa a aseguradora AIG por violar embargo a Cuba,
Irán y Sudán -
https://www.martinoticias.com/a/ofac-mpone-multa-a-aseguradora-aig-violar-embargo-cuba-iran-sudan-/147873.html
          Kony 2012 Campaign Catches Eyes Of Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga   

Campaign aims to bring African militia leader Joseph Kony to justice for war crimes and for enlisting children as soldiers.
By Gil Kaufman

<P>A campaign to stop the nearly 30-year, brutal rule of African militia leader Joseph Kony became a viral sensation this week. <a href="http://kony2012.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com" target="_blank">"Kony 2012,"</a> started by the group Invisible Children, aims to make Kony's face so famous that authorities will finally be able to arrest him and try him for his crimes. </P><P> </P><P>A 30-minute <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y4MnpzG5Sqc" target="_blank">documentary</a> released on Monday is one of the keys to the campaign, and as of Thursday it had gotten more than 26 million views. The video details the atrocities carried out by Kony and his Lord's Resistance Army. The campaign appears to be working, as at one point on Wednesday, Invisible Children and #stopkony were trending higher on Twitter than Peyton Manning or the new iPad. </P><P> </P><P>Since 1987, human rights officials say Kony has forcefully abducted more than 60,000 children to be soldiers in his army and reportedly raped, mutilated and killed civilians in Uganda, the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan and displaced more than 2 million people. The leader is wanted for committing atrocities by the International Criminal Court and is being hunted down by 100 U.S. Special Forces advisers and local troops in four Central African nations, according to the <a href="http://bit.ly/AyrDyz"><I>Associated Press.</I></a> </P><P> </P><P>Kony 2012 is an effort to capture Kony and disarm the LRA before a reported window of opportunity closes. One way it plans to do that is by encouraging users to directly message a variety of stars to make use of their Twitter ubiquity to get the word out. Among those listed on the site are: Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, Taylor Swift, Rihanna, Angelina Jolie, Oprah Winfrey, George Clooney, Jay-Z, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Ryan Seacrest and Ellen DeGeneres, along with a number of major policymakers. </P><P> </P><P>When users click on the celebs' photos, a tweet pops up that reads: Help us end #LRA violence. Visit kony2012.com to find out why and how. @timtebow Join us for #KONY2012. </P><P> </P><P><a href="http://act.mtv.com/posts/invisible-children-video-joseph-kony/">Get More on Invisible Children at ACT.MTV.com.</a></p>

Related Artists

Source:
http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1680708/kony-campaign-justin-bieber-lady-gaga.jhtml

Hilary Swank Isla Fisher Ivana Bozilovic Ivanka Trump


          FIFA issue ban deadline to Sudan over government intervention   

FIFA gave Sudan’s Football Federation (SFA) until June 30 to avoid an international ban from football by reinstating the FIFA-recognised SFA chairman and board of directors. The international governing body of football has warned Sudan that it’ll face suspension from world football in case it failed to overturn an order by the ministry of justice […]

The post FIFA issue ban deadline to Sudan over government intervention appeared first on KingFut.


          AIMS Rwanda Graduation 2017   
The African institute for mathematical Sciences Rwanda Centre graduated its first ever cohort of students at a graduation ceremony held at the AIMS center in Kigali, Rwanda on 22nd June  2017 Forty-four students from 10 African countries, namely; Cameroon, Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Sudan, Burundi, Nigeria, Zambia, Kenya and Tanzania received their Master’s of Science in Mathematical Sciences ...
Read More

          Travel ban takes effect but less chaos expected   
WASHINGTON – A scaled-back version of President Donald Trump's travel ban took effect Thursday evening, stripped of provisions that brought protests and chaos at airports worldwide in January yet still likely to generate a new round of court fights.

The new rules, the product of months of legal wrangling, aren't so much an outright ban as a tightening of already-tough visa policies affecting citizens from six Muslim-majority countries. Refugees are covered, too.

Administration officials promised that implementation this time, which started at 8 p.m. EDT (0000 GMT), would be orderly. Customs and Border Protection spokesman Dan Hetlage said his agency expected "business as usual at our ports of entry," with all valid visa holders still being able to travel.

Still, immigration and refugee advocates are vowing challenge the new requirements and the administration has struggled to explain how they will make the United States safer.

Under the temporary rules, citizens of Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya, Iran and Yemen who already have visas will be allowed into the United States. But people from those countries who want new visas will now have to prove a close family relationship or an existing relationship with an entity like a school or business in the U.S.

It's unclear how significantly the new rules will affect travel. In most of the countries singled out, few people have the means for leisure travel. Those that do already face intensive screenings before being issued visas.

Nevertheless, human rights groups on Thursday girded for new legal battles. The American Civil Liberties Union, one of the groups challenging the ban, called the new criteria "extremely restrictive," ''arbitrary" in their exclusions and designed to "disparage and condemn Muslims."

The state of Hawaii filed an emergency motion Thursday asking a federal judge to clarify that the administration cannot enforce the ban against relatives – such as grandparents, aunts or uncles – not included in the State Department's definition of "bona fide" personal relationships.

Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer met with customs officials and said he felt things would go smoothly.

"For tonight, I'm anticipating few issues because, I think, there's better preparation," he told reporters at Los Angeles International Airport on Thursday night. "The federal government here, I think, has taken steps to avoid the havoc that occurred the last time."

Much of the confusion in January, when Trump's first ban took effect, resulted from travelers with previously approved visas being kept off flights or barred entry on arrival in the United States. Immigration officials were instructed Thursday not to block anyone with valid travel documents and otherwise eligible to visit the United States.

Karen Tumlin, legal director of the National Immigration Law Center, said the rules "would slam the door shut on so many who have waited for months or years to be reunited with their families.

Trump, who made a tough approach to immigration a cornerstone of his election campaign, issued a ban on travelers from the six countries, plus Iraq, shortly after taking office in January. His order also blocked refugees from any country.

Trump said these were temporary measures needed to prevent terrorism until vetting procedures could be reviewed. Opponents noted that visa and refugee vetting were already strict and said there was no evidence that refugees or citizens of those six countries posed a threat. They saw the ban as part of Trump's campaign promise to bar Muslims from entering the United States.

Lower courts blocked the initial ban and a second, revised Trump order intended to overcome legal hurdles. The Supreme Court on Monday partially reinstated the revised ban but exempted travelers who could prove a "bona fide relationship" with a U.S. person or entity. The court offered only broad guidelines.

In guidance issued late Wednesday, the State Department said the personal relationships would include a parent, spouse, son, daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling already in the United States. It does not include other relationships such as grandparents, grandchildren, aunts and uncles. On Thursday, the State and Homeland Security departments had both expanded the range of bona fide relationships to include fiancés.

Business or professional links must be "formal, documented and formed in the ordinary course rather than for the purpose of evading" the ban. Journalists, students, workers or lecturers who have valid invitations or employment contracts in the U.S. would be exempt from the ban. The exemption does not apply to those who seek a relationship with an American business or educational institution purely for the purpose of avoiding the rules.

Refugees from any country will face similar requirements. But the U.S. has almost filled its quota of 50,000 refugees for the budget year ending in September and the new rules won't apply to the few remaining slots. With the Supreme Court set to consider the overall ban in October, the rules could change again.

The travel ban may have the largest impact on Iranians. In 2015, the most recently available data, nearly 26,000 Iranians were allowed into the United States on visitor or tourist visas. Iranians made up the lion's share of the roughly 65,000 foreigners from the six countries who visited with temporary, or non-immigrant visas that year.

American journalist Paul Gottinger, said he and his Iranian fiancee applied for a visa nearly a year ago but are still waiting on a decision. Gottinger says they were to wed at a Japanese garden in his parents' home state of Minnesota this month but postponed the ceremony until August because they had not yet received the visa.

Now, he expects they will have to delay again.

"Every twist and turn of the courts, we're holding our hearts and our stomachs are falling to the floor," he said by phone from Turkey.

The new regulations are also affecting the wedding plans of Rama Issa-Ibrahim, executive director of the Arab American Association of New York.

She is Syrian-American and had planned to get married this fall. While her father in Syria may be able to get a visa, her aunts and uncles may well be blocked.

"I would love for them to be at this wedding, and unfortunately, they aren't going to be able to be here," she said, adding that the ceremony would be postponed.

___

Associated Press writer Amy Taxin and Andrew Dalton in Los Angeles and Michael Noble in New York contributed to this report.


          「ガンプラEXPO in TSUDANUMA」スタート!津田沼に最新ガンプラ集まる!   
6月30日(金)から7月10日(月)まで、津田沼パルコにて「ガンプラEXPO in TSUDANUMA」が開催!現地の写真レポートをお届けします! #GUNPLA #GUNDAM #ガンプラ #ガンダム #g_bf #g_tekketsu
          As Trump's travel ban enforcement commences, Hawaii challenges exemption rule   
President Donald Trump's travel ban on six Muslim-majority nations has gone into limited effect, following the Supreme Court removing holds on enforcement. But already there are reported legal challenges to how certain travelers are exempted. The state of Hawaii is challenging the administration's definition of what constitutes a "bona fide" relationship for exempt travelers, according to the Associated Press. The Trump administration includes familial relationships such as a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, or sibling already in the US, as well as half and step-relationships, State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert told ABC News. Hawaii's emergency motion filed Thursday evening calls for US District Judge Derrick Watson to tell the administration that fiancés or other relatives not defined are also exempt. Travelers with valid visas as well as vetted refugees approved for entry through July 6 will also be exempt. The affected countries are Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. The State Department announced that the temporary travel ban would go into effect at 8:00pm EST earlier Thursday, while that start time had also been widely reported Wednesday.
          Trump’s Modified Muslim Ban – What You Need to Know   
President Donald J. Trump's modified version of the travel ban, aka the Muslim ban, is set to go into affect tonight. The Supreme Court ruling on Monday partially lifted the stay on the Muslim ban, putting into place certain stipulations while allowing travelers from the six mostly-Muslim countries listed in the ban (Yemen, Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya and Iran) to still enter the United States.
          Lawyers across Canada on stand-by to monitor Trump’s travel ban   

On Friday morning, hundreds of volunteer lawyers and advocates gathered in major airports across the country to assist travellers affected by a subset of U.S. President Donald Trump’s travel ban, which took effect on June 29.

The new travel restrictions tighten any entry to the United States of citizens from six Muslim-majority countries. Citizens of Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya, Iran and Yemen who already have visas will be allowed into the U.S.; but, people from those countries who want new visas will have to prove a close family relationship or an existing relationship with a school or business in the U.S.

According to Corey Shefman, coordinator of the Pearson Airport team of lawyers, there was a lot of confusion the last time the travel ban was ordered.

“No one knew how to implement it,” said Shefman. “Airlines were making decisions about visas, when, really, it’s not up to Air Canada but customs.”

Shefman and his team of 400 volunteer lawyers have been at Toronto Pearson since 4 a.m, working shifts, “ready to respond if something happens.” They were there to provide support to travellers, provide information and make everyone aware of their presence.

“Airports and agents are pleased to see us,” said Shefman. Together, they have created a much more organized response and come up with a plan to deal with any issues that may become apparent.

Ottawa-based lawyer, Ronalee Carey, spent close to three hours at the airport briefing security and airline agents from Air Canada and United. They even left literature on the travel ban near custom forms.

“We really didn’t know what to expect. There was a lot of inconsistent information being released the night before,” said Carey. This was echoed by the team of lawyers in Toronto and Vancouver as well.

Homeland security’s website did provide clarification later on, which specified what constituted as a close family relationship. (Grandparents, nieces and nephews, aunts and uncles don’t count.)

“What family means is different in different cultures,” said Shefman. “In the cultures where this ban is taking most effect, family is often more expansive than the government’s interpretation.”

Both Shefman and Carey clarified that even under the new restrictions no one travelling with a current visa and/or with a Canadian passport would be affected, regardless of their country of origin.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if it happened. Last time Canadians were affected even though they weren’t meant to be,” said Shefman.

Being at the airport, equipped with information packages and connected to lawyers in the U.S who are fighting the ban, is a way to be prepared.

“I’d rather get there and have nothing to do then not go and there be someone who is stuck and is having difficulty and needs help,” said Carey. “We’re ready to go back if and when necessary.”


          Trump-Einreisesperren werden umgesetzt   
In den USA ist der von Präsident Donald Trump verhängte Einreisebann gegen Bürger aus den sechs mehrheitlich muslimischen Ländern Iran, Syrien, Jemen, Libyen, Somalia und Sudan in Kraft getreten. Der Supreme Court verfügte, dass das Verbot in Teilen vorläufig in Kraft treten dürfe. Eine endgültige Entscheidung will das Gericht im Herbst fällen.
          World: General Assembly Approves Appropriation of $6.8 Billion for 14 Peacekeeping Operations in 2017/18   
Source: UN General Assembly
Country: Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Western Sahara, World

GENERAL ASSEMBLY PLENARY
SEVENTY-FIRST, 89TH MEETING (AM)
GA/11927 30 JUNE 2017

Approving the appropriation of $6.80 billion for 14 peacekeeping operations for the 2017/18 fiscal period, the General Assembly today adopted 21 resolutions and one decision contained in reports from its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary). (See Press Release GA/AB/4239.)

Appropriating funds for peacekeeping operations from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, the Assembly adopted resolutions on missions in Abyei, Central African Republic, Côte d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Darfur, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Golan, Haiti, Kosovo, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, South Sudan and Western Sahara.

All texts were adopted without a vote, with the exception of the resolution setting out budgetary arrangements for the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), which it adopted by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States) with no abstentions.

The Assembly also adopted related drafts on the support account for peacekeeping operations, and financing for the account; on the triennial review of the rates and standards for reimbursement to Member States for contingent-owned equipment; and on the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi, Italy, and Regional Service Centre in Entebbe, Uganda.

As well, it adopted a resolution on special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and abuse, by which it requested the Secretary-General to immediately inform Member States concerned of allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse, and called upon Member States — including those deploying non-United Nations forces authorized by a Security Council mandate — to investigate such cases, hold perpetrators accountable and repatriate units where there was credible evidence of widespread or systemic sexual exploitation and abuse.

Also adopted was a text on the United Nations financial reports and audited financial statements on peacekeeping missions, as well as the Board of Auditors’ reports on them.

Finally, the Assembly adopted a draft decision by which it deferred, until the second part of its resumed seventy-second session, consideration of reports from the Secretary-General, and related reports from the Advisory Committee, regarding closed peacekeeping missions.

Action on Draft Resolutions

The Assembly took action on the draft resolutions contained in reports from its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), which were introduced by Committee Rapporteur Diana Lee (Singapore).

First, it adopted a resolution contained in the budget Committee’s report on financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors (document A/71/702/Add.1), accepting the financial report and audited financial statements of United Nations peacekeeping operations for the period ending 30 June 2016. It endorsed the recommendations in the corresponding reports of the Board and the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), and asked the Secretary-General to ensure their full implementation. It went on to ask the Secretary-General to indicate an expected time frame for implementation, and to give, in his next report, a full explanation for delays in implementation of the Board’s outstanding recommendations, the root causes of recurring issues and measures to be taken.

It then turned to the report on administrative and budgetary aspects of financing peacekeeping operations (document A/71/708/Add.1), adopting five resolutions contained therein.

First, it adopted resolution I on the financing of the Regional Service Centre in Entebbe, Uganda, by which it approved the amount of $33 million for the maintenance of the Centre for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

Then it adopted resolution II on the financing of the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi, Italy, by which the Assembly would approve the cost estimates for the Base in the amount of $81 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

Next, it adopted resolution III on the support account for peacekeeping operations. By its terms, the Assembly decided to approve the support account requirements of $325.80 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $25.04 million for the enterprise resource planning project, $821,500 for information and systems security and $868,500 for the global service delivery model. It also approved the requirement of 1,357 continuing and 3 new temporary posts, as well as the abolishment, redeployment, reassignment and reclassification of posts, as set out in annex I of the text; and 77 continuing and 3 new general temporary assistance positions and 59 person-months, as set out in annex II, as well as related post and non-post requirements.

The Assembly went on to adopt resolution IV on the triennial review of the rates and standards for reimbursement to Member States for contingent-owned equipment. By doing so, it took note of the report of the 2017 Working Group on Contingent-Owned Equipment and the report of the Secretary-General. It also endorsed the conclusions and recommendations contained in the report of the ACABQ.

Finally, it adopted resolution V on special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse. By its terms, the Assembly welcomed the Secretary-General’s determination to fully implement the United Nations policy of zero tolerance for sexual exploitation and abuse, as well as his determination to fully enforce the newly promulgated policy of whistle-blower protection. It requested that he immediately inform Member States concerned of allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse, and called upon Member States — including those deploying non-United Nations forces authorized by a Security Council mandate — to investigate such cases, hold perpetrators accountable and repatriate units where there was credible evidence of widespread or systemic sexual exploitation and abuse.

Turning to reports on peacekeeping missions, the Assembly first adopted a text on financing of the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA) (document A/71/945), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNISFA the amount of $285.12 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $266.70 million for the maintenance of the Force, $13.49 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $3.38 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $1.56 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Turning to a report on financing of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) (document A/71/946), the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the Mission $943.77 million from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $882.80 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $44.65 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $11.16 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $5.16 million for the Regional Service Centre.

The Assembly then adopted a text on financing of the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI) (document A/71/715/Add.1). By its terms, the Assembly, recalling Security Council resolution 2284 (2016) extending the mission mandate for a final period until 30 June 2017, decided that, for Member States that had fulfilled their financial obligations to the Operation, shall be credited with their respective share of $65.22 million, comprising the unencumbered balance of $48.68 million and $16.54 million of other revenue in respect of the financial period ending 30 June 2016.

It then adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) (document A/71/947). By its terms, it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNFICYP $57.41 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, inclusive of $54.00 million for the maintenance of the Force, $2.73 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $682,900 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

Next, it adopted a report on financing of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) (document A/71/948), appropriating to the Special Account for MONUSCO $1.22 billion for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, inclusive of $1.14 billion for the maintenance of the Mission, $57.74 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $14.44 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $6.67 million for the Regional Service Centre.

The Assembly then adopted a resolution contained in the Committee’s report on financing of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) (document A/71/933) by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for that Mission $5.69 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 31 December 2017, including $4.55 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $1.14 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.

Next, the Assembly adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) (document A/71/950), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNMIK $40.29 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $37.90 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $1.92 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $479,200 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

It then adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) (document A/71/951). By its terms, it appropriated to the Special Account for UNMIL $116.95 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $110.00 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $5.56 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $1.91 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.

The Assembly also adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) (document A/71/952), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for MINUSMA $1.12 billion for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $1.05 billion for the maintenance of the Mission, $53.00 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $13.25 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $6.12 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Under its agenda item on financing of the United Nations peacekeeping forces in the Middle East, the Assembly took action on resolutions contained in two reports.

It first adopted a draft on the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) (document A/71/953), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the Force the amount of $61.30 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $57.65 million for the maintenance of UNDOF, $2.92 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $729,100 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

The representative of Syria said his delegation had joined consensus on the resolutions on United Nations peacekeeping forces in the Middle East. However, it believed that it was Israel’s responsibility to pay for those Missions.

The Assembly then turned to a resolution contained in the report on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) (document A/71/954).

By a recorded vote of 85 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States) with 53 abstentions, the Assembly adopted preambular paragraph 4 and operative paragraphs 4, 5 and 13.

Taking action on the draft resolution as a whole, the Assembly adopted it by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States) with no abstentions.

By its terms, the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNIFIL the amount of $513.53 million, for the period from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, inclusive of $483.00 million for the maintenance of the Force, $24.43 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $6.11 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.

Also by the draft, the Assembly expressed deep concern that Israel had not complied with previous resolutions on UNIFIL, and requested that the Secretary-General take the measures necessary to ensure the full implementation of their relevant paragraphs.

The Assembly then adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) (document A/71/955), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNMISS $1.14 billion for the period from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $1.07 billion for the maintenance of the Mission, $54.16 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $13.54 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $6.26 million for the Regional Service Centre.

The Assembly then adopted the resolution in the report on financing of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) (document A/71/956), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for MINURSO $55.59 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $52.00 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $2.63 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $657,600 for the United Nations Logistics Base and $303,800 for the Regional Service Centre.

It then adopted a resolution on financing of the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) (document A/71/957), by which it appropriated to the Special Account for UNAMID $33.56 million for the period of 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $24.58 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $6.15 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $2.84 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Taking up the report on financing of the activities arising from Security Council resolution 1863 (2009) (document A/71/958), the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the United Nations Support Office for the African Union Mission in Somalia (UNSOA) $622.19 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $582.00 million for the maintenance of the Office, $29.43 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $7.36 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $3.40 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Finally, acting on the Committee’s report on review of the efficiency of the administration and financial functioning of the United Nations (document A/71/717/Add.2), the Assembly deferred until the second part of its resumed seventy-second session consideration of the reports of the Secretary-General and the ACABQ on closed peacekeeping missions.


          Kenya: WFP Kenya — Refugee Resource Update June 2017   
Source: World Food Programme
Country: Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan

Highlights

Since April, WFP has been providing full food assistance to refugees in Dadaab, Kakuma and Kalobeyei. This return to 100 percent food assistance was gratefully received by refugees.

However, available funding will only allow WFP to continue to provide full food assistance until the end of August. From September, if new resources are not made available by donors, WFP will be compelled to stop its cash transfers to refugees. This will have a dramatic impact, particularly on refugees in Kalobeyei as their food assistance is provided in the form of cash transfers.

New funds are also required to continue to assist refugees in Kakuma and Dadaab with in-kind food from November onwards.

Overall, WFP requires US$9.4 million to ensure full food assistance to refugees, of which US$6.6 million is required for cash transfers.

New contributions for both food and cash transfers will need to be received during July for assistance to be continued beyond September.

WFP gratefully thanks European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) for the US$8.6 million donation to fund cash transfers.

Nutrition activities to prevent moderate acute malnutrition in refugees currently reach 48,000 children and pregnant and breastfeeding women monthly. Treatment of moderate acute malnutrition in refugees covers 9,000 women and children per month. These activities are fully funded until the end of October.


          World: Global Weather Hazards Summary, June 30 - July 6, 2017   
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Belize, Benin, Burkina Faso, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Togo, Uganda, World

Heavy rainfall continues over Central America

Africa Weather Hazards

  1. Below-average rainfall since mid-May has led to abnormal dryness across eastern Uganda and southwestern Kenya. Moisture deficits are likely to negatively impact cropping and Pastoral activities.

          As South Sudan's civil war rages, cholera takes deadly toll   

Clasping frail arms around his stomach, Machar Weituor doubles over in pain as he slowly positions himself over the hole in his bed. Too feeble to make it to the toilet, the 40-year-old groans faintly as he defecates into a bucket.


          World: Missing Out on Small is Beautiful: The EU’s failure to deliver on policy commitments to support smallholder agriculture in developing countries (Briefing paper)   
Source: Oxfam
Country: Burkina Faso, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, World, Yemen

With the world on the brink of an unprecedented four famines, donor countries must urgently step up efforts to tackle the structural causes of hunger and poverty. Food security and sustainable agriculture are among the European Union’s key priorities for development cooperation. The EU is committed to longterm solutions, including empowering smallholders, in particular women, and supporting environmentally sustainable approaches in agriculture. In practice, however, its development aid to the agricultural sector does not live up to its commitments. An Oxfam analysis of more than 7,500 EU-funded projects reveals a significant lack of transparency in reporting, casting doubt on the accountability of the EU’s aid. Based on the reported data, only a small portion of the EU’s agricultural development aid complies with the aim of targeting small-scale producers and women. Funding is also biased towards industrial and export crops and countries of strategic interest, at the expense of smallholders and countries most in need.

1 INTRODUCTION

In 2017, less than 10 years after the 2007–08 food price crisis, the world stands on the brink of an unprecedented four famines. Famine has already been declared in South Sudan, while Nigeria, Yemen and Somalia are also facing the risk of mass starvation.

These are just four of the dozens of countries confronting acute and widespread food insecurity.1 Globally, an estimated 795 million people – one in nine worldwide – are still going hungry.2 The reasons for this are many, including high food prices, low agricultural productivity, abnormal weather patterns and conflict. Yet the scale of food insecurity points to deeper problems in the global food system that have never been adequately tackled. Social and economic exclusion, structural poverty, lack of access to productive resources such as land, and imbalances in power are consigning millions of people to hunger.

There is significant agreement on the need for greater commitment to address the longterm structural causes of food insecurity – and solutions are known. Empowering smallholders and supporting their efficient and environmentally sustainable approaches to agriculture is a proven long-term solution to reducing hunger and poverty and tackling power imbalances and inequalities. At least 475 million small-scale farms worldwide support around two billion people, and investing in the sector is known to have immense potential for reducing poverty. Women play a potentially transformative role in agricultural development, but they continue to face social, cultural and economic constraints that limit their potential in the sector.

European Union policy makers are aware of both the challenges and the solutions. The role of agriculture was recognized as being crucial for poverty reduction in the 2005 European Consensus on Development. Responding to some of the most severe global food price crises from 2007 onwards, the EU launched the €1bn Food Facility, with a specific focus on small-scale producers, in 2009 and the Food Security Policy Framework (FSPF) in 2010. Through the FSPF, the EU committed to a rights-based approach to support small-scale food producers, gender mainstreaming and ecologically sustainable approaches. Since then, it has made further policy commitments to reinforce priorities established in 2010; an Implementation Plan has been produced, and the European Commission has compiled consolidated EU-wide biennial progress reports since 2014. The new European Consensus on Development, adopted in May 2017, reiterates the central importance of smallholder farmers.

However, Oxfam’s analysis of the EU’s official development assistance (ODA) for agriculture reveals that its investments do not match its policy priorities. On average, the EU’s financial support for the three priority areas of smallholders, gender equality in agriculture and ecological sustainability is strikingly low. An analysis of preimplementation project data shows that less than one-quarter of EU aid for agriculture explicitly targets small-scale producers. Only 2–3 percent of EU funding promotes gender equality in agriculture, while ecological sustainability is largely missed out in planning documents altogether. Furthermore, with the exception of just one year, EU ODA has consistently supported industrial and export crops with significantly higher budgets than food crops.

Finally, Oxfam’s analysis of EU development funding for agriculture suggests that ODA is being instrumentalized to support EU foreign policy goals instead of responding to the actual needs of the most marginalized people. There is a clear bias towards supporting potential candidates for EU membership and the European neighbourhood regions, to the detriment of poorer regions elsewhere. For instance, the EU spends 3.6 times as much agricultural development aid in Europe as in sub-Sahara Africa.


          Somalia: WFP VAM Food Security Analysis - East Africa: The 2017 Season - A Humanitarian Crisis Looms   
Source: World Food Programme
Country: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Horn of Africa region is again under drier than average conditions after experiencing a severe drought during the last growing season of Oct-Dec 2016.

  • Severe rainfall deficits are observed across Somalia, Kenya and SE Ethiopia, leading to delayed starts to the growing season, poor vegetation cover and low water resources. Significant impacts on crop production and pasture development are now very likely.

  • The situation looks increasingly similar to the record droughts of 2010-2011 and potentially worse in coastal Kenya. Somalia, currently at risk of famine, will continue to experience further deterioration.

  • Drier than average conditions in place since mid-2016 are continuing to affect large areas across East Africa including NE Uganda (Karamoja), SW Ethiopia and eastern South Sudan.

  • The region as a whole badly needs widespread above average rains throughout May and beyond to avoid significant negative impacts at an even greater scale.


          Somalia: WFP VAM Food Security Analysis - East Africa: The 2017 Season - Crisis Rather Than Disaster   
Source: World Food Programme
Country: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Despite improved rains since late April, the delayed start of the season and severe early dryness will result in poor crop production, degraded pasture and low water availability for human and livestock consumption.

  • The food security situation of the extremely vulnerable households is expected to further deteriorate. Pastoralists in central Somalia, SE Ethiopia and western Kenya are of particular concern.

  • Somalia, Kenya and SE Ethiopia have now endured three consecutive droughts, including one of the most severe on record in Oct-Dec 2016.

  • Central South Sudan, Sudan, NW Ethiopia and Eritrea have experienced abundant rainfall resulting in robust early vegetation growth and early start of the growing season.


          World: Challenges and opportunities across NATO's South: Migration, trafficking, extremism, and instability, Volume 1 I Number 3 I Spring 2017   
Source: OPEN Perspectives Exchange Network (OPEN)
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Lebanon, Mali, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

Executive Summary

NATO and its partners, as a part of discussions related to the Alliance’s efforts to promote peace and security in its broader neighbourhood, have increasingly focused on NATOs’ “Southern Flank.” In the following report, the authors argue that this primarily military term is likely to be off-putting to many current or would-be NATO partners, such as foreign ministries, international organisations, and civilian stakeholders, hindering the goals of “projecting stability” and risking a near-exclusive focus on threats and risks. Furthermore, this report demonstrates how the term “Southern Flank” does not fully capture NATO’s challenges. For example, issues like trafficking and migration originate in far-flung areas including West Africa, Latin America, and Central Asia, which may not be part of the Southern Flank as current conceived by NATO. In suggesting the use of a less heavily value-laden and military-centric term like the “Greater South”, the authors point out that challenges emanating from the Greater South also present opportunities to Alliance states that may bolster NATO’s strategic objectives.

The following observations and findings are based on a review of the pertinent literature from academics, research institutions, governments, and various international organisations (IOs) and international nongovernmental organisations (INGOs). They also emerge in part from the authors’ combined twenty years of research experience working on and researching issues ranging from civil-military interaction to post-crisis stabilisation and humanitarian action in contexts as diverse as Afghanistan, Bosnia - Herzegovina, Lebanon, Somalia Syria and Yemen for governments, UN agencies, the World Bank, INGOs, NATO’s former Civil-Military Fusion Centre and others.

Challenges and Opportunities in NATO’s Greater South

Some of the most immediately pressing challenges emanating from the Greater South include migration and trafficking in drugs, guns, persons as well as conflict and violent extremism. These inter-related issues thrive amidst corruption and low state capacity, prevent economic growth, and facilitate instability and extremism. This report explores these challenges and demonstrates (i) their intersecting nature; (ii) how typical approaches to addressing these issues, including increased border control and military responses, can displace the challenge and plant the seeds of future instability elsewhere; and (iii) that the various challenges facing NATO may be reconceptualised as opportunities rather than purely as threats.

With regard to migration, in 2015, 1.2 million people applied for asylum in Europe, 66.2% of whom were male according to the International Organization for Migration (IOM). This may pose social stability challenges not only in assimilation and cultural differences relating to gender relations but also in the fact that most young, male migrants, many of whom are single, will be jobless for a year or two following arrival. However, with approximately 84% of incoming migrants under 34 years old, the host economy may ultimately benefit economically from migration. The International Monetary Fund (IMF), for instance, estimates annual output to increase by 0.1% in the EU and 0.3% in Germany by the end of 2017.


          Türkiye, izlenecek 10 çatışma listesinde 2. sırada   

Myamar, Ukrayna, Güney Sudan, Sahra, Yemen, Kongo, Afganistan gibi sorunlu bölgeleri geride bırakmayı başarmışız.

Umarım listenin 1. sırasındaki Irak&Suriye'yi de geride bırakarak zirveye ulaşmayız.

Bu başarıyı ilmek ilmek ören, başta Hükümetimiz, Başbakanımız ve elbette sayın Cumhurbaşkanımız'a sonsuz teşekkürler. Elbette istikrar ve stratejik derinlik, bu başarıda büyük rol oynadı.

Şüphesiz ki bizi kıskanan hain batı, bu tablo karşısında çatır çatır çatlamıştır.


          Snarky tweets feature sweet pictures of grandparents to mock Trump's travel ban   
TwitterFacebook

The Trump administration's travel ban from earlier this year just won't go away. Now it's affecting grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, and other family members that don't make the cut as "bona fide" relations — at least, as the State Department sees it.

SEE ALSO: Hilarious photo series shows the alarmingly normal lives of immigrants

After winding its way through the Supreme Court, the watered-down temporary ban went into effect Thursday evening. It bans people coming from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen from getting visas, unless they have a business or academic connection to the U.S. or qualify as certain family relationships. Read more...

More about Twitter, State Department, Hashtags, Travel Ban, and Muslim Majority

          Video: Darfur Destroyed - Sudan's perpetrators break silence   
Read Aegis Trust's press release about this video,


          Alkollü kafadarlar ortalığı bir birine kattı   
Bursa’nın İznik ilçesinde, sahilde alkol alan iki kafadar, daha sonra serinlemek için göle girdi. Gençlerin ikisi de aynı anda sudan çıktı. Fakat alkolün etkisiyle bir birlerini fark etmeyen gençler polisi ve jandarmayı ayağa kaldırdı.Akşam...
          Watch on BBC World News: eight-part series based on UNESCO’s "General History of Africa" book collection   

in_focus_gha_zeinab_badawi.jpg

© BBC World News

Zeinab Badawi delves into the history of Africa for a brand new, eight-part series on BBC World News. The continent of Africa has a long, complex history, and its people built civilizations which rivalled those that existed anywhere else in the world. However, much of the continent’s history is not widely known, and what we are presented with often projects a distorted and partial picture. Sudan-born Zeinab travels to all four corners of Africa, interviewing African historians, archaeologists, and citizens whose accounts and stories paint a vivid picture of their continent's past and how it informs their present lives. It is a series that will inform, educate and entertain - Africa’s history told by Africans themselves.

 

Episodes

BBC World TV: Transmission dates (GMT)

   

1) Mother Africa

In the first episode Zeinab Badawi travels across the continent, examining the origins of humankind and how and why we evolved in Africa. During her journey Zeinab is granted rare access to the genuine bones of one of the most iconic discoveries in the field of palaeontology: Lucy in Ethiopia, or as she is known in Amharic ‘Dinkenesh' - which means 'you are marvellous’! Zeinab also spends time with a unique tribe in Tanzania, who provide insight into how we have lived, for most of our history, as hunter-gatherers. She also looks at what distinguishes us from the animal world and makes us human.

Sat 1st July: 02:10 (Except North and Latin America, 15:10)

Sun 2nd July 09:10, 21:10

 

   

2) Cattle, crops and Iron

Zeinab Badawi continues her journey through the history of human development, travelling to meet the Masai of East Africa where she explains how humans began to domesticate animals and become pastoralists; in Zimbabwe, Zeinab visits one lively farming family and examines how we became settled and began to live from farming. She also looks at how the Iron Age transformed life in Africa and paved the way for the development of rich urban civilisations.

Sat 8th July: 02:10 (Except North and Latin America, 15:10)

Sun 9th July 09:10, 21:10

 

   

3) Gift of the Nile

Zeinab Badawi’s quest to uncover the history of Africa takes her to Egypt, where she explores the most famous civilisation on the continent – the ancient Egyptians. Zeinab takes you beyond the usual coverage of the pharaohs and asks first who the ancient Egyptians actually were? What was their ethnicity? What made such a great civilisation possible? How did they order their society, and what were their values?

Sat 15th July: 02:10 (Except North and Latin America, 15:10)

Sun 16th July 09:10, 21:10

 

   

4) The Kingdom of Kush

In the fourth episode, Zeinab Badawi travels to the country of her birth and the very region of her forefathers: northern Sudan, where she sheds light on a little know aspect of ancient African history: the Kingdom of Kush. Its kings ruled for many hundreds of years and indeed in the eighth century BC, they conquered and governed Egypt for the best part of 100 years. Furthermore Kush was an African superpower, its influence extended to the modern day Middle East. Zeinab shows you some of the best preserved of Sudan’s s 1,000 pyramids and explains how some of the customs of Kush have endured to this day.

Sat 22nd July: 02:10 (Except North and Latin America, 15:10)

Sun 23rd July 09:10, 21:10

 

   

5) The Rise of Aksum

Zeinab Badawi travels to the little visited country of Eritrea and neighbouring Ethiopia, to chart the rise of the Kingdom of Aksum. Described as one of the four greatest civilisations of the ancient world, Zeinab examines archaeological remains in both countries dating from many hundreds of years before Christ. She explains how the Kings of Aksum grew rich and powerful from their control of the Red Sea trade and how they were one of the first civilisations that officially embraced Christianity in the 4th century. Also find out why the Queen of Sheba and the Sacred Ark of the Covenant are so critical to the story of Aksum.

Sat 29th July: 02:10 (Except North and Latin America, 15:10)

Sun 30th July 09:10, 21:10

 

   

6) Kings and Emirs

In the sixth episode, Zeinab Badawi focuses on the fall of the kingdom of Aksum, and how the Christian kings that followed in Aksum’s wake left powerful legacies, especially that of King Lalibela. He is credited with building a complex of rock-hewn churches, which represent amazing feats of engineering. She also charts the arrival of Islam in this part of Africa and how the Christian kings and Muslim emirs co-existed. In the most Muslim of Ethiopia’s cities Harar: she observes the bizarre, long standing tradition of the Hyena Men of Harar.

Sat 5th Aug: 02:10 (Except North and Latin America, 15:10)

Sun 6th Aug 09:10, 21:10

 

   

7) North Africa

In the penultimate episode, Zeinab Badawi’s exploration of Africa’s rich history focuses on North Africa. She goes to Morocco to find out about the original inhabitants of the region - in particular the Berbers or Amazigh - the best known of the people of North Africa. Zeinab visits Carthage in Tunisia and explains who the Carthaginians were. She looks at the great Berber kings and how they managed to retain their influence when North Africa came under Roman rule. Zeinab shows you some of the most extensive and least visited Roman sites in Algeria.

Sat 12th Aug: 02:10 (Except North and Latin America, 15:10)

Sun 13th Aug 09:10, 21:10

 

   

8) Pagans and God

In the final episode, Zeinab Badawi examines the role of religion in Africa. To this day tens of millions of Africans are pagans, who worship a pantheon of Gods and venerate their ancestors. And many more millions of Africans incorporate pagan customs into their monotheistic beliefs. Zeinab takes you through the stages of the arrival of monotheism in Africa: first Judaism , then early Christianity and then finally Islam. She charts the rise of the powerful Islamic dynasties of North Africa, that went on to conquer Spain.

Sat 19th Aug: 02:10 (Except North and Latin America, 15:10)

Sun 20th Aug 09:10, 21:10

 

 


          Blog Post: Expert: State Department Definition of 'Close Family' for Travel Ban is Too Narrow   

Carol Morello, Washington Post, June 29, 2017 - "Visitors from six predominantly Muslim nations will not be granted visas unless they have a very close family tie to someone already in the United States or an entity like a workplace or university, under new guidelines the State Department said become effective Thursday night. A cable sent to consular officials worldwide Wednesday provided a narrow definition of close family: a parent, spouse, child, an adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling, as well as stepfamily relationships. However, it explicitly excluded other family relationships: grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, fiances and other “extended” family relations. ... Cornell University Law School professor Stephen Yale-Loehr, who has written volumes of legal books on immigration law, said more than half of all refugees have no close family ties in the United States. Among past refugees who would be barred from entering today, he said, are the Lost Boys of Sudan and children orphaned by famine and war. “Similarly, why can a stepsister visit the United States but not a grandmother?” he said. “The State Department should vet visa applicants on a case-by-case basis for terrorism concerns, not impose overly broad categories that prevent innocent people from coming to this country.”

- Cornell Law Prof. Stephen W. Yale-Loehr


          Blog Post: June 28, 2017 DOS Cable on Travel Ban After Supreme Court Order   

From Reuters:

Date: June 28, 2017 at 7:57:39 PM EDT

Subject: (SBU) IMPLEMENTING EXECUTIVE ORDER 13780 FOLLOWING SUPREME COURT RULING -- GUIDANCE TO VISA-ADJUDICATING POSTS

From: SECSTATE WASHDC

Action: ALL DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR POSTS COLLECTIVE IMMEDIATE

1. (SBU) Summary: On June 26, 2017, the Supreme Court partially lifted preliminary injunctions that barred the Department from enforcing section 2 of Executive Order (E.O.) 13780, which suspends the entry to the United States of, and the issuance of visas to, nationals of six designated countries, as well as section 6, which relates to the Refugee Admissions Program. A June 14, 2017 Presidential Memorandum announced each enjoined provision would become effective the date and time at which the referenced injunctions are lifted or stayed, with implementation of each relevant provision within 72 hours after all applicable injunctions are lifted or stayed with respect to that provision. As a result, implementation of those sections for which injunctions have been lifted will begin June 29, 2017, as detailed below.

2. (SBU) This cable provides guidance for implementing provisions of
section 2(c) of the E.O. impacting visa adjudication and issuance
procedures. The E.O.’s 90-day suspension of entry will be implemented
worldwide at 8:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) June 29, 2017. All visa
adjudicating posts should carefully review and prepare to implement this
guidance at that time or at opening of the next business day if not open at 8:00 p.m. EDT June 29, 2017. Any
modifications to this guidance, due to litigation or other reasons, will be
sent in a subsequent cable. Public talking points and additional
operational resources will be updated and available on CA Webhttp://intranet.ca.state.sbu/content/caweb/visas/news/100011.html>.

End Summary.

3. (SBU) The Supreme Court’s partial lifting of the preliminary

injunctions allows the E.O.’s suspension to be enforced only against foreign
nationals who lack a “bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the
United States.” Therefore, applicants who are nationals of the affected
countries who are determined to be otherwise eligible for visas and to have a
credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the
United States are exempt from the suspension of entry in the United States as
described in section 2(c) of the E.O. Applicants who are nationals of the
affected countries and who are determined to be otherwise eligible for visas,
but who are determined not to have a qualifying relationship, must be eligible
for an exemption or waiver as described in section 3 of the E.O. in order to be
issued a visa. For adjudication purposes, the Supreme Court criteria have
been couched in this guidance as exemptions from the E.O.’s suspension of entry
in paragraph 10.

(SBU) Suspension of Entry into the United States for Aliens from Certain Countries

4. (SBU) The E.O. exercises the President’s authority under sections

212(f) and 215(a)(1) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) and suspends
for 90 days entry into the United States of, and issuance of visas to, certain
aliens from the following countries: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria,
and Yemen. Implementation of the suspension, for purposes of visa
issuance, will begin at 8:00 p.m. EDTJune
29, 2017, worldwide. The suspension of entry in the E.O.
does not apply to individuals who are inside the United States on June 29, 2017, who have a valid
visa on June 29, 2017,
or who had a valid visa at 8:00 p.m. EDT January 29, 2017, even after their
visas expire or they leave the United States. The suspension of entry
also does not apply to other categories of individuals, as detailed
below. No visas will be revoked based on the E.O., even if issued during
the period in which Section 2(c) was enjoined by court order or during the
72-hour implementation period. New applicants will be reviewed on a
case-by-case basis, with consular officers taking into account the scope and
exemption provisions in the E.O. and the applicant’s qualification for a
discretionary waiver. Direction and guidance to resume normal processing
of visas following the 90-day suspension will be sent septel.

(SBU) Nonimmigrant Visas

5. (SBU) GSS vendors and posts will continue scheduling NIV applicants of

the six indicated nationalities. The E.O. provides for a number of
exemptions from its scope and includes waiver provisions, and whether an
applicant is exempt or qualified for a waiver can only be determined on a
case-by-case basis during the course of a visa interview.

6. (SBU) Beginning 8:00 p.m. EDT June 29, 2017, NIV applicants

presenting passports from any of the six countries included in the E.O. should
be interviewed and adjudicated following these procedures:

a.) Officers should first determine whether the applicant is eligible for a

visa under the INA, without regard to the E.O. If the applicant is not
eligible, the appropriate refusal code should be entered into the Consular
Lookout and Support System (CLASS). See 9 FAM 303.3-4(A). Posts
must follow existing FAM guidance in 9 FAM 304.2 to determine whether an SAO
must be submitted. Applicants found ineligible for grounds unrelated to
the E.O. should be refused according to standard procedures.

b.) If an applicant is found otherwise eligible for the visa, the consular

officer will need to determine during the interview whether the applicant is
exempt from the E.O.’s suspension of entry provision (see paragraphs 10-13),
and if not, whether the individual qualifies for a waiver (see paragraphs 14
and 15).

c.) Applicants who are not exempt from the E.O.’s suspension of entry provision

and who do not qualify for a waiver should be refused by entering the code
“EO17” into the Consular Lookout and Support System (CLASS). As
coordinated with DHS, this code represents a Section 212(f) denial under the
E.O.

(SBU) Immigrant Visas

7. (SBU) The National Visa Center (NVC) will continue to schedule

immigrant visa (IV) appointments for all categories and all
nationalities. Posts should continue to interview all other IV applicants
presenting passports from any of the six countries included in the E.O.,
following these procedures:

a.) Officers should first determine whether the applicant is eligible for the

visa, without regard to the E.O. If the applicant is not eligible, the
application should be refused according to standard procedures.

b.) If an applicant is found otherwise eligible for the visa, the consular

officer will need to determine during the interview whether the applicant is
exempt from the E.O.’s suspension of entry provision (see paragraphs 10-13),
and if not, whether the applicant qualifies for a waiver (paragraphs 14 and
15).

c.) Immigrant visa applicants who are not exempt from the E.O.’s suspension of

entry provision and who do not qualify for a waiver should be refused 221(g)
and the consular officer should request an advisory opinion from VO/L/A.

(SBU) Diversity Visas

8. (SBU) For Diversity Visa (DV) applicants already scheduled for

interviews falling after the E.O. implementation date of 8:00 p.m. EDTJune
29, 2017, post should interview the applicants. Posts
should interview applicants following these procedures:

a.) Officers should first determine whether the applicant is eligible for the

DV, without regard to the E.O. If the applicant is not eligible, the
application should be refused according to standard procedures.

b.) If an applicant is found otherwise eligible, the consular officer will need

to determine during the interview whether the applicant is exempt from the
E.O.’s suspension of entry provision (see paragraphs 10-13), and if not,
whether the applicant qualifies for a waiver (paragraphs 14 and 15).

c.) DV applicants who are not exempt from the E.O.’s suspension of entry

provision and who do not qualify for a waiver should be refused 221(g) and the
consular officer should request an advisory opinion from VO/L/A following
current guidance in 9 FAM 304.3-1.

Based on the Department’s experience with the DV program, we anticipate that

very few DV applicants are likely to be exempt from the E.O.’s suspension of
entry or to qualify for a waiver. CA will notify DV applicants from the
affected nationalities with scheduled interviews of the additional criteria to
allow the potential applicants to determine whether they wish to pursue their
application.

9. (SBU) The Kentucky Consular Center (KCC) will continue to schedule

additional DV-2017 appointments for cases in which the principal applicant is
from one of these six nationalities. While the Department is mindful of
the requirement to issue Diversity Visas prior to the end of the Fiscal
Year on September 30, direction and
guidance to resume normal processing of visas following the 90-day suspension
will be sent septel.

(SBU) Individuals Who Are Exempt from the E.O.’s Suspension of Entry

10. (SBU) The E.O.’s suspension of entry does not apply to the following:

a.) Any applicant who has a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a

person or entity in the United States. Any such relationship with a
“person” must be a close familial relationship, as defined below. Any
relationship with an entity must be formal, documented, and formed in the ordinary
course, rather than for the purpose of evading the E.O. Note: If
you determine an applicant has established eligibility for a nonimmigrant visa
in a classification other than a B, C-1, D, I, or K visa, then the applicant is
exempt from the E.O., as their bona fide relationship to a person or entity is
inherent in the visa classification. Eligible derivatives of these
classifications are also exempt. Likewise, if you determine an applicant
has established eligibility for an immigrant visa in the following classifications
-- immediate relatives, family-based, and employment-based (other than certain
self-petitioning employment-based first preference applicants with no job offer
in the United States and SIV applicants under INA 101a(27)) -- then the
applicant and any eligible derivatives are exempt from the E.O.

b.) Any applicant who was in the United States on June 26, 2017;

c.) Any applicant who had a valid visa at 5:00 p.m. EST on January 27, 2017, the day
E.O. 13769 was signed;

d.) Any applicant who had a valid visa on June 29, 2017;

e.) Any lawful permanent resident of the United States;

f.) Any applicant who is admitted to or paroled into the United States on or
after June 26, 2017;

g.) Any applicant who has a document other than a visa, valid on June 29, 2017, or issued
on any date thereafter, that permits him or her to travel to the United States
and seek entry or admission, such as advance parole;

h.) Any dual national of a country designated under the order when traveling on
a passport issued by a non-designated country;

i.) Any applicant travelling on an A-1, A-2, NATO-1 through NATO-6 visa, C-2
for travel to the United Nations, C-3, G-1, G-2, G-3, or G-4 visa, or a
diplomatic-type visa of any classification;

j.) Any applicant who has been granted asylum; any refugee who has already been
admitted to the United States; or any individual who has been granted
withholding of removal, advance parole, or protection under the Convention
Against Torture; and

k.) Any V92 or V93 applicant.

11. (SBU) “Close family” is defined as a parent (including
parent-in-law), spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law,
daughter-in-law, sibling, whether whole or half. This includes step
relationships. “Close family” does not include grandparents,
grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-laws and
sisters-in-law, fiancés, and any other “extended” family members.

12. (SBU) A relationship with a “U.S. entity” must be formal, documented,

and formed in the ordinary course rather than for the purpose of evading the
E.O. A consular officer should not issue a visa unless the officer is
satisfied that the applicant’s relationship complies with these requirements
and was not formed for the purpose of evading the E.O. For example, an
eligible I visa applicant employed by foreign media that has a news office
based in the United States would be covered by this exemption. Students
from designated countries who have been admitted to U.S. educational
institutions have a required relationship with an entity in the United
States. Similarly, a worker who accepted an offer of employment from a
company in the United States or a lecturer invited to address an audience in
the United States would be exempt. In contrast, the exemption would not
apply to an applicant who enters into a relationship simply to avoid the
E.O.: for example, a nonprofit group devoted to immigration issues may
not contact foreign nationals from the designated countries, add them to client
lists, and then secure their entry by claiming injury from their inclusion in
the E.O. Also, a hotel reservation, whether or not paid, would not
constitute a bona fide relationship with an entity in the United States.

13. (SBU) When issuing an IV or an NIV to an individual who falls into

one of the categories listed in paragraph 10, the visa should be annotated to
state, “Exempt or Waived from E.O. 13780.” Interviewing officers must
also enter a clear case note stating the specific reason why the applicant is
exempt from the E.O.’s suspension of entry. If consular officers are
unclear if an applicant qualifies for an exemption, the cases should be refused
under INA 221(g) and the consular officer should request an advisory opinion
from VO/L/A following current guidance in 9 FAM 304.3-1.

(SBU) Qualification for a Waiver and Process

14. (SBU) The E.O. permits consular officers to grant waivers and

authorize the issuance of a visa on a case-by-case basis when the applicant
demonstrates to the officer’s satisfaction that the following three criteria
are all met:

a.) Denying entry during the 90-day suspension would cause undue hardship;

b.) His or her entry would not pose a threat to national security; and

c.) His or her entry would be in the national interest.

15. (SBU) The E.O. lists the following examples of circumstances in which

an applicant may be considered for a waiver, subject to meeting the three
requirements above. Note that some of the waiver examples listed in the
E.O. are now considered exemptions in light of the Supreme Court’s
ruling. Consular officers should determine whether individuals are exempt
from the E.O. under standards described above, before considering the
availability of a waiver under the standards described in this paragraph.
Unless the adjudicating consular officer has particular concerns about a case
that causes the officer to believe that that issuance may not be in the
national interest, a determination that a case falls under any circumstance
listed in this paragraph is a sufficient basis for concluding a waiver is in
the national interest. Determining that a case falls under some of these
circumstances may also be a sufficient basis for concluding that denying entry
during the 90-day suspension would cause undue hardship:

a.) The applicant has previously established significant contacts with the

United States but is outside the United States on the effective date of the
E.O. for work, study, or other lawful activity;

b.) The applicant seeks to enter the United States for significant business or

professional obligations and the denial of entry during the suspension period
would impair those obligations;

c.) The applicant is an infant, a young child, or adoptee, an individual

needing urgent medical care, or someone whose entry is otherwise justified by
the special circumstances of the case;

d.) The applicant is traveling for purposes related to an international

organization designated under the International Organizations Immunities Act,
traveling for purposes of conducting meetings or business with the United
States government, or traveling to conduct business on behalf of an
international organization not designated under the IOIA; or

e.) The applicant is a permanent resident of Canada who applies for a visa at a

location within Canada.

16. (SBU) Listed in this paragraph are other circumstances in which an

applicant may be considered for a waiver, subject to meeting the three
requirements in paragraph 14. Consular officers should determine whether
individuals are exempt from the E.O. under standards described above, before
considering the availability of a waiver under the standards in paragraph

15. Unless the adjudicating consular officer has particular concerns
about a case that suggest issuance may not be in the national interest, determining
that a case falls under any circumstance listed in this paragraph is a
sufficient basis for concluding a waiver is in the national interest.
Determining that a case falls under some of these circumstances may also be a
sufficient basis for concluding that denying entry during the 90-day suspension
would cause undue hardship:

a.) The applicant is a high-level government official traveling on official

business who is not eligible for the diplomatic visa normally accorded to
foreign officials of national governments (A or G visa). Examples include
governors and other appropriate members of sub-national (state/local/regional)
governments; and members of sub-national and regional security forces; and

b.) Cases where all three criteria in paragraph 14 are met and the Chief

of Mission or Assistant Secretary of a Bureau supports the waiver.

17. (SBU) If the applicant qualifies for a waiver based on criteria in

paragraphs 14 or 15, the consular officer may issue the visa with the
concurrence of the Visa Chief (IV or NIV) or the Consular Section Chief.
The visa should be annotated to read, “Exempt or Waived from E.O. 13780.”
Case notes must reflect the basis for the waiver; the undue hardship that would
be caused by denying entry during the suspension; the national interest; and
the position title of the manager concurring with the waiver. To document
national interest in case notes in circumstances falling under paragraph 14 or
paragraph 15(a), (b), or (c), the consular officer may write, “National
interest was established by the applicant demonstrating satisfaction of the
requirements for the waiver based on [insert brief description of category of
waiver].”

18. (SBU) If the applicant does not qualify under one of the listed

waiver categories in paragraphs 14 or 15, but the interviewing officer and
consular manager believe that the applicant meets the requirements in paragraph
14 above and therefore should qualify for a waiver, then the case should be
submitted to the Visa Office for consideration. These cases should be
submitted via email to countries-of-concern-inquiries@state.gov.
The Visa Office will review these requests and reply to posts within two
business days. Consular officers should be able to approve the majority
of waiver cases without review by the Visa Office due to the broad authority
granted in the E.O.

(SBU) Refugees

19. (SBU) The U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) is suspended for

120 days, except for those cases where the Supreme Court has kept the temporary
injunction in place for any applicant who has a credible claim of a bona fide
relationship with a person or entity in the United States. Any such
relationship with a “person” must be a close familial relationship, as defined
above in paragraph 11. Any relationship with an entity must be formal,
documented, and formed in the ordinary course, rather than for the purpose of
evading the E.O as described in paragraph 12. We believe that by their
nature, almost all V93 cases will have a clear and credible close familial
relationship with the Form I-730 petitioner in the United States and qualify
for issuance under this exemption.

20. (SBU) Posts should not cancel any V93 appointments, and NVC will

continue to schedule new V93 appointment as normal. Beginning 8:00 p.m. EDT Thursday June 29, 2017, V93
applicants presenting passports from any of the six countries included in the
E.O. should be interviewed and adjudicated following these procedures:

a.) Officers should first determine whether the applicant is eligible for a V93

under the current policy, without regard to the E.O. If the applicant is
not eligible, the appropriate refusal code should be entered into the Consular
Lookout and Support System (CLASS). Applicants found ineligible for
grounds unrelated to the E.O. should be refused according to standard
procedures. See 9 FAM 203.6.

b.) If an applicant is found otherwise eligible for the V93 foil, the consular

officer will need to determine during the interview whether the applicant is
exempt from the E.O.’s suspension of entry provision based on a credible claim
of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States per
paragraph 19.

c.) Applicants who are not exempt from the E.O.’s suspension of entry provision

should be refused by entering the code “EO17” into the Consular Lookout and
Support System (CLASS). Please contact your VO/F liaison with any
questions about V93 processing or adjudication under the E.O.

(SBU) V92 Cases

21. (SBU) The E.O. does not affect V92 applicants, and post should

adjudicate these cases per standard guidance.

22. (SBU) Posts with questions regarding this guidance should contact

their post liaison officer in CA/VO/F."


          Chad   
Chad is a landlocked country in the Northern part of Africa. It is bordered by Sudan, Libya, Niger and Cameroon and the Central African Republic. The northern part of Chad is in the Sahara, the southern part is in the Sahel. Most of Chad is dry and arid. [...]
          Offer - Hibiscus Extract - CHINA   
Xi’AN LESEN BIO-TECHNOLOGY CO.,LTD. specializes in the ten years of plant extracts and export trade, to provide customers with high-quality, organic, natural, good price of various plant extracts, fruit and vegetable powder, as well as cosmetics, chemical raw materials.Hibiscus has been used to ease indigestion, relieve colds and respiratory trouble, and as an aid to circulation. Hibiscus is commonly made as a tea to ease stomach trouble. Hibiscus is also a natural source of Vitamin C. b). Hibiscus, also known as Red Tea, China Rose, Red Sorrell, Roselle, Jamaica Tea, and Sudanese Tea, is not just another pretty flower. Hibiscus grows in tropical areas throughout the world, and has been used not just as an ornament, but also medicinally for centuries. The part of this plant used medicinally is the flower.Prodcut name: Hibiscus ExtractLatin Name: Hibiscus sabdariffa Specification: Proanthocyanidin 5%-10%Appearance: Red to Violet-red fine powderMesh size: 80 MeshUsed Part: FlowerGrade: Food & PharmaceuticalBrand Name: LS-HerbTest Method: UVFunction:1. It was used by the Chinese to treat dandruff and stimulate hair growth. 2. Hibiscus has also been used to treat hemorrhoids and wounds. 3. The Hibiscus flower is made into a tea in numerous cultures throughout the world. 4. Hibiscus has a mild flavor and has many culinary uses. 5. Recent research has shown that Hibiscus may have antibacterial properties. 6. It is a mild laxative and it contains Vitamin C and malic acid. 7. Hibiscus has also been shown to relax the uterus and reduce blood pressure. 8. Hibiscus has also been used for indigestion and loss of appetite, as well as for colds, respiratory problems, and circulation disorders Application:1. Applied in food field, can be used as food additives to make tea and produce beverages, which rich in vitamin C;2. Applied in pharmaceutical field, contain anthocyanins can eliminate free radicals, alleviate aging;3. Applied in cosmetic field, can be made into a variety of preparation, such as antibacterial agents, digestive, laxative, stomachic4. Food colourings: food or beverage.
          GÜNEŞ YANIĞINA NE İYİ GELİR?   
Yaz gelmesiyle birlikte hepimiz akın akın denize koşturuyoruz. Deniz güzel güneş harika ama işte denizde geçirilen bu güzel günün ardından bazen istemeden de olsa güneş yanıklarıyla karşı karşıya kalırız. İşte bu sorunu yaşayanlar için çözüm olabilecek pratik çözümleri sizlerle paylaşmak istedim.
GÜNEŞ YANIĞINA NE İYİ GELİR?
Güneş yanığına evdeki malzemelerden pratik çözümler,

YOĞURT: Aslında bu yöntemi belki de uygulamayan yoktur. Hatta bazılarınız koca karı yöntemi diye düşünüp gülüyor bile olabilirsiniz. Ama emin olun yoğurt cildin yatışmasını ve soğumasını sağlar. Bu sayede rahatlamaya neden olur. En etkili uygulama için yağsız yoğurdu sürdükten sonra üç-dört dakika bekledikten sonra ılık suyla durulamanız yeterli olacaktır.

ZEYTİNYAĞI: Neredeyse her derde deva zeytinyağının iyileştirici gücü burada da karşımıza çıkıyor. Güneş yanığından dolayı kuruyan ve gerilen cildimize zeytinyağını sürüp üzerine sıcak su ile ıslattığınız havluyu koyup tamamen soğuyuncaya kadar bekletiyoruz. Havlu soğuduktan sonra cildinizi hafifçe silebilirsiniz.

ALOE VERA JELİ: Sadece güneş yanığında değil diğer yanık tedavisinde de oldukça etkili olan aloe vera jeli yanan bölgeye sürüldüğünde cildi yumuşatıp temizlenmesini sağlamaktadır. Aloe vera jelini güneşten etkilenen bölgenize avuç içinizle iyice yedirin ve emmesini bekledikten sonra soğuk suyla durulayın.

YULAF EZMESİ: Güneşten yanan cildinize iyi gelen diğer bir seçenekte yulaf ezmesidir. Bunun için yarım bardak yulaf ezmesini bir bardak kaynar suyla karıştırıp soğumaya bırakıyoruz. Soğuyan karışımı güneşten yanan cildinizin üzerine yavaş yavaş dairesel hareketlerle sürüyoruz. Sürdükten sonra üç dört dakika kadar bekletip soğuk suyla güzelce duruluyoruz.

Bunların dışında güneş yanığına karşı yapılabilecekler,

    Sık sık kendinizi serinletmenize yardımcı olacak duşlar alın. Fakat bu esnada özellikle vücudunuz su toplamışsa tazyikli sudan kaçının bu yanık olan bölgenin patlayıp daha çok tahriş olmasına neden olabilmektedir. Ayrıca sabun, duş jelleri gibi maddelerden de kaçının. Bunlar sizi daha çok rahatsız edebilir.

    Duş dışında serin bezlerle kompres de yapabilirsiniz.

    Bol, rahat ve pamuksu kıyafetler giyin.

    Güneş yanıklarının sebep olduğu diğer bir durumda baş ağrısıdır. Bunun için serin ve sesiz bir odada uyumak size iyi gelecektir. Baş ağrısının diğer bir nedeni de vücudunuzun susuz kalmasından kaynaklanabilmektedir. Bu yüzden daha fazla sıvı tüketmeye özen gösterin.

          Trump, Twitter si scaglia contro il Muslim Ban: "Questa è mia nonna. Non una terrorista"   

Il Muslim Ban sospende gli ingressi per i cittadini di sei paesi a maggioranza islamica (Iran Libia Siria Somalia Sudan Yemen). Entrato in vigore il 29 giugno,...


          Arkadaşını boğuldu sanınca...   
Bursa’nın İznik ilçesinde, sahilde alkol alan iki kafadar, daha sonra serinlemek için göle girdi. Gençlerin ikisi de aynı anda sudan çıktı. Fakat alkolün etkisiyle bir birlerini fark etmeyen gençler polisi ve jandarmayı ayağa kaldırdı.
          Alkollü kafadarlar ortalığı bir birine kattı   
Bursa’nın İznik ilçesinde, sahilde alkol alan iki kafadar, daha sonra serinlemek için göle girdi. Gençlerin ikisi de aynı anda sudan çıktı. Fakat alkolün etkisiyle bir birlerini fark etmeyen gençler polisi ve jandarmayı ayağa kaldırdı.Akşam...
          Talha Görgülü, Oha Camel   

Evet. Kapkalabalık bir azınlığız. Kimler geldi kimler göçtü. Pink Floyd’lar, B.B. King’ler, Jethro Tull’lar.. kimler kimler?  70’ler 80’ler. Bizden diyebileceğimiz bir grup daha var. Camel. Dumanıyla, çilesiyle, sıcağıyla, soğuğuyla, ümidiyle, zaferiyle, mağlubiyetiyle Camel. Peki neden Camel? Diğerlerinden farkı ne? Saf progressive rock yapmıyor mu? Evet yapmıyor. Alıyor batının saf-yalan hüznünü, çölün kasvetli sıcaklarına taşıyor. İsmi ile müsemma. Camel işte.     Bir şarkısıyla hemen yolculuğa başlayalım, Rajaz: https://youtu.be/2hAsURnKrv0   İşte yıldızların bize rehberlik ettiği bir yolculuk.. Bir devenin üstünde, doruklarımıza kadar hissediyoruz çölün zorluklarını. Termos misali keçi tulumuna depoladığımız sudan kana kana içtik. Şimdi gece oldu. Hava soğudu.  Çadırımızı serdik,

Talha Görgülü, Oha Camel yazısı ilk önce İzdiham üzerinde ortaya çıktı.


          Trump’s Travel Ban at the Supreme Court: What now?   

On Monday, June 26 the Supreme Court stayed lower court injunctions to President Trump’s travel ban Executive Order (EO)—meaning the EO can now be enforced by the Government, though narrowed from the Administration’s original blanket ban. The decision was delivered per curiam: unsigned and written on behalf of the full Court. Importantly, the Court did not decide on whether EO itself is constitutional, though it agreed to hear arguments for that case during the first session of the October 2017 term.

The EO implements, in part, a 90-day ban to ensure, as the Court describes, “that dangerous individuals do not enter the United States while the Executive is working to establish “adequate standards… to prevent infiltration by foreign terrorists”…” The EO singles out Iran and five Arab countries (Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) as subject to the travel ban. This characterization may show how the Court will view the Government’s intent behind the EO when they review the case on the merits in the fall. 

While the original 90-day period expired on June 14, 2017, the Administration stated that the EO would go into effect for a full 90 day-period within 72 hours of a potential stay granted by the Court. In the decision, the Court states that it “fully expects” that the executive will be able to conclude its desired investigations and reports within that period of time. 

As such, the EO is allowed to take force for a full 90 days, only to those who “lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.” The Court provides some guidance on this caveat. For individual connections, a “close familial relationship” is required. For organizational ties, the relationship must be formal and documented. The Court warns against fraud, stating that immigration nonprofits cannot contact foreign nationals to add as clients simply to avoid application of the EO. 

These requirements apply equally to refugees: bona fide connections to US persons or organizations allow for exception from the EO. The Court does not provide a test or basis for determining whether organizational connections are created pursuant to bona fide relationships or fraudulently. This ambiguity may prove to be the source of further litigation during the coming months. 

The Court’s reasoning in arriving at this decision is risk averse, attempting to find a middle road between allowing either party complete victory. Citing case law, the Court wrote that it is necessary “to explore the relative harms” to the parties and “the public at large”. Those with bona fide connections have legitimate interests which outweigh the Government’s claims; the Court agreed with previous decisions with respect to their specific cases litigated—students returning to their education in the US and a man seeking the entry of family members all are excepted for the EO.

However, the Court felt that the injunctions of the lower courts were overly broad. The Court states that there are no individual burdens on Americans if those with no connections to the country are barred entry, and thus will not out-weigh the interests of the Government. In short, the interests of those with bona fide connections to the US out-weigh the Government’s claims, but the Government’s claims out-weigh the interests of those with no bona fide connections to the US. 

Because the Court granted stay without ruling on the merits of the case—that is, whether the EO itself is constitutional—there is no discussion of the validity of the Government’s national security claims in this decision, nor a discussion as to whether the EO unconstitutionally targeted Muslim-majority countries. Regrettably, the Court does not consider the interests, safety, or historically bleak state of immigrants and refugees who may wish to enter the US, either, nor does the decision mention international legal obligations toward asylum seekers.

The implementation of the EO, now with the blessing of the US Supreme Court, will signal to Iranians and citizens of the five Arab countries, all predominantly Muslim, that they are specifically subject to increased scrutiny without a legal investigation into the justification for such discrimination. The chilling effect of requiring greater burdens for citizens of these six countries than other foreign nationals endangers both the lives of hopeful refugees and our moral stature in the Arab world and the international community more broadly. America should remain a country which welcomes tourists, refugees, asylum seekers, and immigrants of all religions and nationalities who seek to find a better life on her shores.

What this means:

  • Nationals from Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Yemen, and Iran will not be admitted into the US through the end of September 2017 unless they can show a “bona fide relationship” with a US person or organization.
  • The Trump Administration will review internal and country-specific security and vetting processes regarding the above six countries.
  • The US Supreme Court will hear arguments as to whether the Executive Order is constitutional in early October 2017.

          The Counties: South Sudan boy kills Kenyan bishop over loud prayers   
Bishop Mwendwa leaves behind a widow and two children.
          Rare Pieces, Reinvigorated Classics, New Works and More Set for Arcola Theatre's 2017 Grimeborn Opera Festival   

See opera differently at Grimeborn. 'East London's ... irreverent and influential festival of new opera' (Time Out) is back for its 11th year with 14 exciting productions at the Arcola Theatre.

Rarely-performed pieces. Reinvigorated classics. Brand new works from some of the UK's most exciting up-and-coming artists and companies.

Tickets range from £7 to £22. Whether it's your first or your latest opera experience, you'll be right at home at Grimeborn 2017.

Artistic Director Mehmet Ergen said: "I'm thrilled to announce Arcola's new season, which features the eleventh edition of our Grimeborn Opera Festival.

"Later in the year, Olivier Award-winning OperaUpClose comes to Arcola for the first time with a major new English version of Tchaikovsky's EUGENE ONEGIN."

"This is an exciting time at Arcola. Having just retained our place in Arts Council England's National Portfolio, we are able to produce more new works from raw talent, reimagined classics and ambitious plays from thrilling contemporary voices. I look forward to welcoming you to Arcola again soon."


FULL LISTINGS:

Studio 1

25 July - 29 July 2017
Leoe&Hyde present
The Marriage of Kim K

Music: Stephen Hyde
Words: Leo Mercer
Direction: Stephen Hyde

The Kim Kardashian musical
The Mozart opera
At the same time

In 2011, Kim Kardashian televised her fairytale wedding to NBA basketball star Kris Humphries. 72 days later she filed for divorce.

In this brisk, clever and ambitious take on Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro, the iconic Kardashian flop takes centre stage with another marriage on the brink: Mozart's explosive Count and Countess.

Three squabbling couples. Three styles of music. One big problem. Combining pop, electronic and classical music, this bitingly satirical romp is a heartfelt reminder of the power of love in tense times.

Cast: Yasemin Gulumser, James Edge, Nathan Bellis, Emily Burnett, Stephen Hyde, Amelia Gabriel
Lighting Design: Alexander Newton

Tuesday-Saturday at 7.30pm
Tickets £12-£22
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com
@marriageofkimk

31 July - 4 August 2017
The Opera Company and The Asyla Ensemble present
The Cunning Little Vixen

Music & Words: Leos Janacek
Direction: Guido Martin-Brandis

Once upon a time, deep in the woods, a man caught a vixen...

When a forester brings home a baby fox, he doesn't quite realise what he's let himself in for. Discover The Cunning Little Vixen, the story of a young Vixen growing up in the parallel worlds of the animals and the humans.

One of the twentieth century's most beautiful operas, Janá?ek's masterpiece is a humorous, profound, and life-affirming meditation on the wonder of nature, and a celebration of its eternal renewal.

This innovative production brings the animal world to life with dance, masks and puppetry. Sung in English with a brand new chamber arrangement, the superb cast features some of the UK's most talented young artists.

Cast: Alison Rose, Beth Margaret-Taylor, Camilla Farrant, Tim Langston, Oliver Gibbs, Ashley Mercer
Design: Alexander McPherson

Monday - Friday at 7.30pm
Tickets £12-£22
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com

2 August 2017
Pop Up Opera presents
Une Education Manquée

Music: Emmanuel Chabrier
Words: Eugène Leterrier and Albert Vanloo
Direction: Isabelle Kettle
Musical Direction: William Cole

After a sold-out performance at Wilderness Festival 2016, Pop Up Opera present Emmanuel Chabrier's rarely-performed Une Éducation Manquée for one night only.

Set in the time of Louis XVI, Une Éducation Manquée is a deliciously madcap and witty 45-minute French operetta. It is the tale of two teenaged newly-wed aristocrats, flummoxed by the expectations of their wedding night and by what it means to be husband and wife. Follow the would-be "lovers" through useless adult advice and discover the only combination that can truly bring them together: thunder, hormones, and a loose nightgown.

Cast: Susanna Fairbairn, Christine Buras, Oskar McCarthy

Wednesday 2 August at 7.30pm
Tickets £14-£17
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com
@PopupOperaUK

5 August - 6 August 2017
Basement Orchestra presents
Porgy & Bess

Music: George Gershwin
Words: DuBose Heyward and Ira Gershwin
Arrangements: Knut Olv Ryngestad, Guy Jones and Tom Mawby
Musical Director: Guy Jones

Singers: Talia Cohen, Masimba Ushe

'Summertime / And the livin' is easy.....'

Porgy and Bess contains some of the most iconic music of the twentieth century, but there is much more to this work than easy livin' and cotton growing high.

The composer George Gershwin sought to do justice to African American music in this maverick creation, but over the years, controversy and accusations of racial stereotyping have dogged his 'folk opera'.

For their latest outing to Grimeborn, Basement Orchestra contront Gershwin's masterpiece, telling the story with key details and extracts, performed with live singers and dazzling musicianship.

Saturday - Sunday at 7.30pm
Tickets £12-£17
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com
@Basement_London

8 August - 12 August 2017
Ensemble OrQuesta presents
Armide

Music: Jean-Baptiste Lully
Words: Philippe Quinault
Direction: Marcio da Silva

All's unfair in love and war

Armide is the original warrior princess: a powerful sorceress who can have her pick of any man. But when she falls for her nemesis, the throes of battle become the throes of passion. Will she pick love, or vengeance?

Armide is a thrilling tale of desire, betrayal and magic. Ensemble OrQuesta brings this 1686 classic from the crusades into the present, with artistic director Márcio da Silva and an ensemble of talented young soloists.

Tuesday - Saturday 7.30pm
Tickets £12-£22
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com

13 August 2017
Arcola Theatre Creative Engagement presents
V

Music: Jen Waghorn
Words: Bec Martin-Williams and Jen Waghorn
Direction: Bec Martin-Williams

Performed by young people aged 14-25

'I am all the daughters of my father's house, and all the brothers too.'

V wants to escape. Their past, their grief, their life. Everyone else wants to label them. If you don't belong in a box, where do you belong?

Inspired by Shakespeare's Twelfth Night , V is a devised musical by young people aged 14-25 from Arcola's award-winning Creative Engagement department.

Sunday 13 August at 4pm & 8pm
Tickets £9 (£7 concessions)
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com

16 - 26 August 2017
Arcola Theatre presents
Samson and Delilah

Music: Camille Saint-Saëns
Words: Ferdinand Lemaire
Direction: Aylin Bozok

Samson, leader of the Israelites, is a man of superhuman strength. Against the Philistines he seems invincible. With Delilah, his Philistine lover, he is openly infatuated.

The source of Samson's power is a secret - but when Delilah decides to root it out, her discovery threatens to change the course of history forever.

Director Aylin Bozok won the WhatsOnStage Award for Most Promising Newcomer for her production of Pelléas et Mélisande at Grimeborn 2013. Now, following hit shows at Bury Court and Opera Holland Park, she returns to Arcola with a bold new take on Camille Saint-Saëns' extraordinary biblical epic.

Tuesday - Saturday 7.30pm
Tickets £12-£22
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com

29 August - 2 September 2017
Richard Williamson and CliMar Productions present
Thrill Me: The Leopold & Loeb Story

Music & Words: Stephen Dolginoff
Direction: Guy Retallack
Design: James Turner
Lighting Design: Richard Williamson
Sound Design: Peter Russell

Cast: Harry Downes , Alex Spinney

The Lindbergh Kidnapping. O.J. Simpson. The Great Train Robbery. Many events have been dubbed the crime of the twentieth century, but few surpass the menace of the 'Thrill Killers', Leopold and Loeb.

In Chicago, 1924, two college kids sign a contract in blood. Nietzsche-obsessed Loeb has a serious superiority complex - he's a 'Superman', above the constraints of good and evil. Leopold is a loner and a willing accomplice, craving his partner's time, attention and conditional love. Can they perpetrate the perfect crime?

This multi-award-winning, five-star production returns to London for five performances at Grimeborn, complete with the original UK creative team.

Tuesday - Saturday 7.30pm
Tickets £12-£22
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com

Studio 2

1 August - 3 August 2017
Opera Alegria presents
The Silken Ladder & The Husband at the Door

Music: Offenbach and Rossini
Words: Lindsay Bramley
Direction: Benjamin Newhouse-Smith

Cast (The Silken Ladder): Jodie Kearns, Alicia Gurney, Robert Jenkins, Alistair Sutherland
Cast (The Husband at the Door): Naomi Kilby, Jodie Kearns, Christopher Killerby, Ian Massa-Harris, Alistair Sutherland, Christopher Faulkner

Mistaken identities, mismatched lovers, narrow escapes and unexpected undergarments.... Opera Alegria bring them all to Grimeborn for their new double bill of Rossini's The Silken Ladder and Offenbach's A Husband at the Door.

Director Benjamin Newhouse-Smith sets both works in the same room, but eighty years apart, with new contemporary translations from Lindsay Bramley.

Tuesday - Thursday 8pm
Tickets £14-£17
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com
@OperaAlegria

4 August - 5 August 2017
Shadwell Opera present
Diary Of One Who Disappeared

Music: Leos Janacek
Words: Ozef Kalda
Direction: Jack Furness
Design: Jack Furness

Cast: Angharad Lyddon, Sam Furness
Pianist: Matthew Fletcher

Herald Angel award-winners Shadwell Opera come to Grimeborn for the first time with a staging of Janacek's dramatic song-cycle, Diary of One Who Disappeared.

Internationally-recognised rising star Sam Furness stars in this tale of a young farmer who falls in love with a 'gypsy girl', and faces an ensuing crisis of identity and indecision.

Updated in Jack Furness' staging as the video-diary of an asylum centre worker, this enigmatic tale of cross-cultural love is rendered more fascinating and pertinent than ever.

Shadwell Opera have a growing reputation as one of the country's leading opera voices, offering performances of dramatic intensity and musical excellence at venues expected and unexpected across the capital. This production marks Sam and Jack Furness's first collaboration in six years, alongside pianist Matthew Fletcher and mezzo-soprano Angharad Lyddon.

Friday - Saturday 8pm
Tickets £12-£15
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com
@shadwellopera

6 August 2017
Melanie Gall Presents, in association with Arcola Creative Engagement present
Opera Mouse

Music: Mozart, Bizet, Puccini
Words: Melanie Gall
Direction: Erik deWaal

Tilly Mouse lives under an opera house, and she just loves to sing! But whenever anyone sees her, they scream and run away. With determination, imagination and help from her friends, Tilly proves that even a mouse can be a star.

Opera Mouse has been performed in venues all around the world, ranging from a theatre in Canada, an orphanage in Morocco, a school in Sudan and a shopping mall in Algeria.

Now it comes to Grimeborn for one day only. Don't miss this Sunday morning spectacular for children and adults alike.

Sunday 11 am
Tickets £8.50
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com
@Melaniegallpresents

17 August - 19 August 2017
Spectra Ensemble presents
Collision

Music: Lewis Coenen-Rowe
Words: Kurt Schwitters
Direction: Cecilia Stinton
Design: Holly Muir
Lighting Design: John Pham

Cast: Barnaby Beer, Olivia Sjöberg, Henry George Page, Juliet Wallace, Bathany Horak-Hallett

A strange Green Globe is on course to collide with Earth, and panic is rife on the streets of Berlin. Citizens flee from the TV station to the church - until finally, at the airport, they await the final curtain...

Part absurdist science-fiction, part sultry cabaret, Collision is the first and only opera work from avant-garde artist Kurt Schwitters. Conceived in 1928 as a Dada-esque piece combining hyperactive farce and nihilistic satire, it was never produced in his lifetime.

Now, 90 years on, Spectra Ensemble recreates Collision as a fully-staged comic opera, set to new cabaret and jazz influenced music by Lewis Coenen-Rowe, and with a design inspired by Schwitters' own brand of collage art.

Thursday - Saturday 8pm
Tickets £14-£17
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com
@SpectraEns

21 - 22 August 2017
Helios Collective presents
Il Letto (The Bed)

Music: Giacomo Puccini
Words: Christopher Hogg
Direction: Ella Marchment
Design: Jefferson Miranda

Cast: Emma Walsh, Raphaela Papadakis, Noah Mosley

For Puccini, the creation of an opera was a love affair. Many of his heroines had strong links to the women in his life: from Corinna, the young prostitute whom he loved while writing Madama Butterfly, to Doria, the maid who committed suicide in his house while he was developing La Fanciulla del West.

In this revealing new 'plaria' (play with music), Helios Collective explore Puccini's real and imagined worlds, his extraordinary music and his tumultuous infidelities.

Told by Puccini's wife Elvira Bonturi, it is a tale about the destructive tensions between real life and opera, heroines and muses.

Monday - Tuesday 8pm
Tickets £17 (£14 concessions)
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com

24 August - 26 August 2017
irrational theatre presents
Fun at the Festival
A fusion of comic opera and fresh new writing

Music: Arthur Sullivan, Gian-Carlo Menotti
Words: F C Burnand, G.C Menotti, J Norland
Direction: Paula Chitty

Following Leoncavallo's Pagliacci at last year's Grimeborn, irrational theatre return with an innovative and quirky fusion of comic opera and new writing.

A wedding proposal seems to be getting hindered by the constant interruption of phonecalls in The Telephone (L'amour a Trois) by Gian Carlo Menotti. In Sullivan's Cox and Box, two men unknowingly share the same room until they discover their landlord's trick. The two operas are matched with a new comic play, Cycle, about a neighbourly dispute over a bicycle.

A real treat for opera and new writing lovers, these three little gems make for a playful and fun-filled evening at the festival.

The Telephone
Music & Libretto by Gian Carlo Menotti
Arrangement with Chester Music trading as G. Schirmer on behalf of G. Schirmer Inc
Cast: Samantha Green, Ben Sebastian Charlesworth, Katy Bingham Best

Cox and Box
Libretto by F. C Burnand
Music by Arthur Sullivan
Cast: Sebastian Charlesworth, Joseph O'Gorman, Roger Mullis

Cycle
By Joanna Norland
Cast: Joseph O'Gorman, Samantha Green, Katy Bingham Best, Kieran Cummins

Thursday - Saturday 8pm
Tickets £17-£20
Public booking opens Thursday 6 July, 12.30pm at www.arcolatheatre.com
@irrationalandme


Arcola Theatre is one of London's leading off-West End theatres. Locally engaged and internationally minded, Arcola stages a diverse programme of plays, operas and musicals. World-class productions from major artists appear alongside cutting-edge work from the most exciting emerging companies. Arcola delivers one of London's most extensive community engagement programmes, creating over 5000 opportunities every year. By providing research and development space to diverse artists, Arcola champions theatre that's more engaging and representative. Its pioneering environmental initiatives are internationally renowned, and aim to make Arcola the world's first carbon-neutral theatre.

Tickets go on sale to the public on Thursday 6 July. Priority Booking is now open to all Arcola Theatre Supporters. Memberships start from £50. For more information about memberships or to join at any level, call the Individual Giving & Development Team on 0207 503 1645 or email supportus@arcolatheatre.com. Contact the Box Office at 0207 503 1646 (12.30pm - 6pm) or go online at www.arcolatheatre.com.


          Mausi Segun Appointed Africa Division Executive Director   

(New York) – Human Rights Watch announced today the appointment of Mausi Segun as executive director of the Africa division, effective July 1, 2017.

Segun has worked at Human Rights Watch since 2013 as the senior researcher for Nigeria. During that time, she conducted many field investigations and wrote numerous reports and articles. The topics include violence in north-central Nigeria, killings by state security forces, muzzling of the news media, Boko Haram's abduction of girls and women, and abuses by both sides in the Boko Haram conflict.

Segun has also been a global representative for Human Rights Watch, presenting, analyzing, and advocating for compliance with international human rights and humanitarian law. She has written opinion articles for the New York Times, CNN, Al Jazeera, and other media outlets on conflict-related abuses, religious freedom, women’s and children’s rights, and freedom of expression, among other topics. Prior to Human Rights Watch, Segun worked with the Nigerian government in several capacities, most recently as assistant director and zonal coordinator at the National Human Rights Commission.

“Mausi Segun brings a rich and varied background to the position of Africa division executive director,” said Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch. “Mausi’s expertise and understanding of the complexity of human rights issues in Africa comes at a time of considerable turmoil on the continent.”

The Africa division at Human Rights Watch works to advance human rights throughout the African sub-region and carries out work that includes investigations, reporting, advocacy, and media outreach. The division’s 18 staff members cover over 30 countries on a wide range of human rights abuses, most recently conflict related-abuses in the Sahel, the recruitment and use of child soldiers in South Sudan, police killings and enforced disappearances in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the impact of climate change on the livelihoods of indigenous people in Ethiopia and Kenya.

Human Rights Watch is a nongovernmental organization, established in 1978, that monitors, reports, and advocates on human rights issues in more than 90 countries around the world.


          More court challenges on travel ban   
A scaled-back version of President Donald Trump’s travel is now in force, stripped of provisions that brought protests and chaos at airports worldwide in January yet still likely to generate a new round of court fights. The new rules, the product of months of legal wrangling, aren’t so much an outright ban as a tightening of already-tough visa policies affecting citizens from six Muslim-majority countries. Refugees are covered, too. Administration officials promised that implementation this time, which started at 8 p.m. EDT (0000 GMT), would be orderly. Customs and Border Protection spokesman Dan Hetlage said his agency expected “business as usual at our ports of entry,” with all valid visa holders still being able to travel. Still, immigration and refugee advocates are vowing to challenge the new requirements and the administration has struggled to explain how the rules will make the United States safer. Under the temporary rules, citizens of Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya, Iran and Yemen who already have visas will be allowed into the United States. But people from those countries who want new visas will now have to prove a close family relationship or an existing relationship with an entity like a school or business in the U.S. It’s unclear how significantly the new rules will affect travel. In most of the countries singled out, few people have the means for leisure travel. Those that do already face intensive screenings before being issued visas. Nevertheless, human rights groups girded for new legal battles. The American Civil Liberties Union, one of the groups challenging the ban, called the new criteria “extremely restrictive,” ”arbitrary” in their exclusions and designed to “disparage and condemn Muslims.” The state of Hawaii filed an emergency motion Thursday asking a federal judge to clarify that the administration cannot enforce the ban against relatives — such as grandparents, aunts or uncles — not included in the State Department’s definition of “bona fide” personal relationships. Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer met with customs officials and said he felt things would go smoothly. “For tonight, I’m anticipating few issues because, I think, there’s better preparation,” he told reporters at Los Angeles International Airport on Thursday night. “The federal government here, I think, has taken steps to avoid the havoc that occurred the last time.” Much of the confusion in January, when Trump’s first ban took effect, resulted from travelers with previously approved visas being kept off flights or barred entry on arrival in the United States. Immigration officials were instructed Thursday not to block anyone with valid travel documents and otherwise eligible to visit the United States. Karen Tumlin, legal director of the National Immigration Law Center, said the rules “would slam the door shut on so many who have waited for months or years to be reunited with their families.” Trump, who made a tough approach to immigration a cornerstone of his election campaign, issued a ban on travelers from the six countries, plus Iraq, shortly after taking office in January. His order also blocked refugees from any country. Trump said these were temporary measures needed to prevent terrorism until vetting procedures could be reviewed. Opponents noted that visa and refugee vetting were already strict and said there was no evidence that refugees or citizens of those six countries posed a threat. They saw the ban as part of Trump’s campaign promise to bar Muslims from entering the United States. Lower courts blocked the initial ban and a second, revised Trump order intended to overcome legal hurdles. The Supreme Court on Monday partially reinstated the revised ban but exempted travelers who could prove a “bona fide relationship” with a U.S. person or entity. The court offered only broad guidelines. In guidance issued late Wednesday, the State Department said the personal relationships would include a parent, spouse, son, daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling already in the United States. It does not include other relationships such as grandparents, grandchildren, aunts and uncles. On Thursday, the State and Homeland Security departments had both expanded the range of bona fide relationships to include fiancés. Business or professional links must be “formal, documented and formed in the ordinary course rather than for the purpose of evading” the ban. Journalists, students, workers or lecturers who have valid invitations or employment contracts in the U.S. would be exempt from the ban. The exemption does not apply to those who seek a relationship with an American business or educational institution purely for the purpose of avoiding the rules. Refugees from any country will face similar requirements. But the U.S. has almost filled its quota of 50,000 refugees for the budget year ending in September and the new rules won’t apply to the few remaining slots. With the Supreme Court set to consider the overall ban in October, the rules could change again. The travel ban may have the largest impact on Iranians. In 2015, the most recently available data, nearly 26,000 Iranians were allowed into the United States on visitor or tourist visas. Iranians made up the lion’s share of the roughly 65,000 foreigners from the six countries who visited with temporary, or non-immigrant visas that year. American journalist Paul Gottinger said he and his Iranian fiancee applied for a visa nearly a year ago but are still waiting on a decision. Gottinger says they were to wed at a Japanese garden in his parents’ home state of Minnesota this month but postponed the ceremony until August because they had not yet received the visa. Now, he expects they will have to delay again. “Every twist and turn of the courts, we’re holding our hearts and our stomachs are falling to the floor,” he said by phone from Turkey. The new regulations are also affecting the wedding plans of Rama Issa-Ibrahim, executive director of the Arab American Association of New York. She is Syrian-American and had planned to get married this fall. While her father in Syria may be able to get a visa, her aunts and uncles may well be blocked. “I
          Limited travel ban kicks in   
The Trump administration has set new criteria for visa applicants from six mainly Muslim nations and all refugees that require a “close” family or business tie to the United States. The move came after the Supreme Court partially restored President Donald Trump’s executive order that was widely criticized as a ban on Muslims. Visas that have already been approved will not be revoked, but instructions issued by the State Department Wednesday said that new applicants from Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya, Iran and Yemen must prove a relationship with a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling already in the United States to be eligible. The same requirement, with some exceptions, holds for would-be refugees from all nations that are still awaiting approval for admission to the U.S. Grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, fiancees or other extended family members are not considered to be close relationships, according to the guidelines that were issued in a cable sent to all U.S. embassies and consulates late on Wednesday. The new rules take effect at 8 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on Thursday (0000GMT on Friday), according to the cable, which was obtained by The Associated Press. As far as business or professional links are concerned, the State Department said a legitimate relationship must be “formal, documented and formed in the ordinary course rather than for the purpose of evading” the ban. Journalists, students, workers or lecturers who have valid invitations or employment contracts in the U.S. would be exempt from the ban. The exemption does not apply to those who seek a relationship with an American business or educational institution purely for the purpose of avoiding the rules, the cable said. A hotel reservation or car rental contract, even if it was pre-paid, would also not count, it said. Consular officers may grant other exemptions to applicants from the six nations if they have “previously established significant contacts with the United States;” ”significant business or professional obligations” in the U.S.; if they are an infant, adopted child or in need of urgent medical care; if they are traveling for business with a recognized international organization or the U.S. government or if they are a legal resident of Canada who applies for a visa in Canada, according to the cable. Meanwhile, the Middle East’s biggest airline says its flights to the United States are operating as normal as new travel guidelines come into effect for travelers for six mainly Muslim nations. Dubai-based Emirates said in response to questions on the travel ban Thursday that it “remains guided by the US Customs and Border Protection on this matter.” The carrier reminded passengers that they “must possess the appropriate travel documents, including a valid US entry visa, in order to travel.” On Monday, the Supreme Court partially lifted lower court injunctions against Trump’s executive order that had temporarily banned visas for citizens of the six countries. The justices’ ruling exempted applicants from the ban if they could prove a “bona fide relationship” with a U.S. person or entity, but the court offered only broad guidelines — suggesting they would include a relative, job offer or invitation to lecture in the U.S. — as to how that should be defined. Senior officials from the departments of State, Justice and Homeland Security had labored since the decision to clarify the ruling and Wednesday’s instructions were the result. The new guidance will remain in place until the Supreme Court issues a final ruling on the matter. Arguments before the justices will not be held until at least October, so the interim rules will remain in place at least until the fall. Shortly after taking office, Trump ordered the refugee ban and a travel ban affecting the six countries, plus Iraq. He said it was needed to protect the U.S. from terrorists, but opponents said it was unfairly harsh and was intended to meet his campaign promise to keep Muslims out of the United States. After a federal judge struck down the bans, Trump signed a revised order intended to overcome legal hurdles. That was also struck down by lower courts, but the Supreme Court’s action Monday partially reinstated it. The initial travel ban led to chaos at airports around the world, but because the guidelines exempt previously issued visas, similar problems are not expected. After a judge blocked the original ban, Trump issued a scaled-down order and the court’s action Monday further reduced the number of people who would be covered by it. Also, while the initial order took effect immediately, adding to the confusion, this one was delayed 72 hours after the court’s ruling. Under the new rules, would-be immigrants from the six countries who won a coveted visa in the government’s diversity lottery — a program that randomly awards 50,000 green cards annually to people from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States — will also have to prove they have a “bona fide relationship” with in the U.S. or are eligible for another waiver or face being banned for at least 90 days. That hurdle may be a difficult one for those immigrants to overcome, as many visa lottery winners don’t have relatives in the U.S. or jobs in advance of arriving in the country. Generally, winners in the diversity lottery only need prove they were born in an eligible county and have completed high school or have at least two years of work experience in an occupation that requires at least two other years of training or experience. ___ Alicia A. Caldwell contributed to this report. _______________________________________________________ Copyright © 2017 Capitol Hill Blue Copyright © 2017 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved  
          The Canadian who helped conquer 150,000 sq. km for King Léopold II   
Sub-Title: 
Reflections on Canada’s 150th anniversary are incomplete without this dark chapter of their history

Canada’s 150th anniversary offers a unique opportunity to shed light on some darker corners of the country’s history. One of the dustier chapters is our contribution to one of the most barbarous regimes of the last century and half.

In a bid to extract rubber and other commodities from his personal colony, Belgian King Léopold II instituted a brutal system of forced labour in the late 1800s. Individuals and communities were given rubber collection quotas that were both hard to fulfill and punishable by death. To prove they killed someone who failed to fulfill a quota soldiers from the Force Publique, the colonial police, were required to provide a severed hand. With Force Publique officers paid partly based on the number collected, severed hands became a sort of currency in the colony and baskets of hands the symbol of the Congo Free State.

Between 1891 and 1908 millions died from direct violence, as well as the starvation and disease, caused by Leopold II’s terror. A quarter of the population may have died during Leopold’s reign, which sparked a significant international solidarity movement that forced the Belgian government to intervene and buy the colony.

Halifax’s William Grant Stairs played an important part in two expeditions that expanded Leopold II’s immensely profitable Congolese venture. The Royal Military College of Canada trained soldier was one of 10 white officers in the first-ever European expedition to cross the interior of the continent and subsequently Stairs led an expedition that added 150,000 square kilometres to Leopold’s colony.

In 1887 Stairs joined the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition, which was ostensibly designed to “rescue” the British-backed governor of Equatoria, the southern part of today’s South Sudan. Scottish merchant William MacKinnon asked famed American ‘explorer’ Henry Morton Stanley to lead a relief effort. At the time of the expedition Léopold II employed Stanley, who had been helping the king carve out the ‘Congo Free State’. Seeing an opportunity to add to his colony, Leopold wanted Stanley to take a circuitous route all the way around South Africa, up the Congo River and across the interior of the continent.

One of ten whites, Stairs quickly became second-in-command of the three-year expedition. Read from a humanistic or internationalist perspective, the RMC graduate’s diary of the disastrous expedition is incredibly damning. Or, as Canadian Parliamentary Poet Laureate George Elliott Clarke put it, “Stairs’ account of his atrocities establishes that even Canadians, blinded by racism, can become swashbuckling mass murderers.”

Stairs’ extensive diary, which he asked to be published upon his and Stanley’s death, makes it clear that locals regularly opposed the mission. One passage notes, “the natives made a tremendous noise all night and canoes came close to us, the natives yelling frantically for us to go away” while another entry explains, “the natives destroyed their food rather than let it fall into the hands of the invaders.”

Stairs repeatedly admits to “ransacking the place”. A December 11, 1887 diary entry notes: “Out again at the natives, burned more houses and cut down more bananas; this time we went further up the valley and devastated the country there. In the afternoon [white officer, A. J. Mounteney] Jephson and I went up to some high hills at the back of the camp and burnt all we could see, driving off a lot of natives like so much game. I managed to capture some six goats and yesterday I also got six, which we gave to the men. The natives now must be pretty sick of having their property destroyed in the way we are doing, but it serves them right as they were the aggressors and after taking our cloth, fired on us.”

On a number of occasions the expedition displayed mutilated bodies or severed heads as a “warning” to the locals. Stairs notes, “I often wonder what English people would say if they knew of the way in which we go for these natives; friendship we don’t want as then we should get very little meat and probably have to pay for the bananas. Every male native capable of using the bow is shot. This, of course, we must do. All the children and women are taken as slaves by our men to do work in the camps.”

Stairs led numerous raiding parties to gather “carriers”, which were slaves in all but name. According to The Last Expedition, “[the mission] routinely captured natives, either to be ransomed for food, to get information, or simply to be used as guides for a few days.”

To cross the continent the expedition relied on its superior firepower, which included the newly created 600-bullet-per-minute Maxim gun. Stairs describes one battle, stating that his men were “ready to land and my Maxim ready to murder them if they should dare to attack us.” On another day the firearm aficionado explained, “I cleaned the Maxim gun up thoroughly and fired some 20 or 30 rounds at some howling natives on the opposite bank.” Twenty months into the mission Stairs coyly admits “by what means have we traveled over 730 miles of country from the Congo to the lake? Why by rifle alone, by shooting and pillaging.”

Beyond the immediate death and destruction, the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition opened new areas of the African interior to Arab slave traders and it is thought to be the source of a sleeping sickness epidemic that ravaged the region. The expedition was also devastating for its participants. With little food and much abuse from the white officers, only 253 of the 695 African porters and soldiers who started the mission survived. Additionally, hundreds of other Africans who became part of the expedition at later stages died as well.

There are disturbing claims that some white officers took sex slaves and in one alarming instance even paid to have an 11-year-old girl cooked and eaten. This story scandalized the British public.

For his part, Stairs became almost pathologically inhumane. His September 28, 1887 diary entry notes: “It was most interesting, lying in the bush and watching the natives quietly at their days work; some women were pounding the bark of trees preparatory to making the coarse native cloth used all along this part of the river, others were making banana flower by pounding up dried bananas, men we could see building huts and engaged at other such work, boys and girls running about, singing, crying, others playing on a small instrument common all over Africa, a series of wooden strips, bent over a bridge and twanged with the thumb and forefinger. All was as it was every day until our discharge of bullets, when the usual uproar of screaming of women took place.”

Even with some criticizing the expedition in Britain, Stairs’ efforts were celebrated in Canada. An honouring committee established by the mayor of Halifax decided to give him a sword made in London of Nova Scotia steel and the city organized a reception attended by the Lieutenant-Governor with a military band playing “Here the Conquering Hero Comes.”

Within two years of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition Stairs helped King Leopold II conquer the resource-rich Katanga region of the Congo. Suggested to Leopold by British investors and having already impressed Stanley with his brutality, Stairs headed up a heavily armed mission that swelled to 2,000.

The goal of the expedition was to extend Leopold’s authority over the Katanga region and to get a piece of the copper, ivory and gold trade. Stairs’ specific objective was to get Msiri, the ruler of the region, “to submit to the authorities of the Congo Free State, either by persuasion or by force.” In his diary Stairs says more or less as much, writing that his goals were “above all, to be successful with regard to Msiri ... to discover mines in Katanga that can be exploited ... to make some useful geographic discoveries.” Investigating the area’s suitability for European settlement and for raising domestic animals were other aims of the mission.

As leader of the mission Stairs prepared a daily journal for the Compagnie du Katanga. It details the terrain, resources and inhabitants along the way as well as other information that could assist in exploiting the region. It also explains his personal motivations for taking on the task despite spotty health. “I wasn’t happy [garrisoned with the Royal Engineers in England] in the real sense of the word. I felt my life passing without my doing anything worthwhile. Now I am freely making my way over the coastal plain with more than 300 men under my orders. My least word is law and I am truly the master.” Later, he describes his growing force and power. “I have thus, under my orders, 1350 men — quite a little army.”

Stairs admitted to using slaves even though Leopold’s mission to the Congo was justified as a humanistic endeavour to stop the Arab slave trade. He wrote about how “the anti-slavery society will try and jump upon me for employing slaves as they seem to think I am doing… however, I don’t fancy these will disturb me to a great extent.” The RMC graduate also regularly severed hands and reportedly collected the head of an enemy.

The expedition accomplished its principal objective. Stairs had Msiri killed and threatened Msiri’s brothers with the same fate unless they accepted Leopold as sovereign. After securing their submission Stairs divided the kingdom between Msiri’s adopted son and brothers.

Stairs used a series of racist rationalizations to justify conquering Katanga. He describes the population as “unfortunate blacks who, very often, are incapable of managing their own affairs” and asked in the introduction of his diary: “Have we the right to take possession of this vast country, take it out of the hands of its local chiefs and to make it serve the realization of our goals? … To this question, I shall reply positively, yes. What value would it have [the land he was trying to conquer] in the hands of blacks, who, in their natural state, are far more cruel to one another than the worst Arabs or the wickedest whites.”

At another point Stairs cites another standard colonial justification: “Only rarely do the natives think of improving their lot — that’s the great weakness among the Africans. Their fathers’ ways are theirs and their own customs will be those of their sons and grandsons.”

While Stairs died in the Congo his exploits were lauded in Ottawa when Senator W.J. Macdonald sought to move “a parliamentary resolution expressing satisfaction for Stairs’ manly conduct.” There’s a Stairs Street in Halifax and two brass plaques honour him at the RMC (one for Stairs alone and another dedicated to him and two others). The main plaque reads: “William Grant Stairs, Captain the Welsh Regiment. Born at Halifax Nova Scotia 1 July 1863. Lieutenant Royal Engineers 1885-91. Served on the staff of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition 1887 under the leadership of H.M. Stanley and exhibited great courage and devotion to duty. Died of fever on the 9 June 1892 at Chinde on the Zambesi whilst in command of the Katanga Expedition sent out by the King of the Belgians.” Another plaque was erected for Stairs (and two others) at St. George Cathedral in Kingston, Ontario. And a few hundred kilometers to the southwest “Stair’s Island” was named in his honour in Parry Sound.

Stairs was one of hundreds of Canadians who helped conquer different parts of Africa in the late 1800s. Accounts of Canada’s first 150 years are incomplete without this chapter in our history.

* YVES ENGLER author of, Canada in Africa: 300 years of aid and exploitation.

* THE VIEWS OF THE ABOVE ARTICLE ARE THOSE OF THE AUTHOR AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF THE PAMBAZUKA NEWS EDITORIAL TEAM

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          Sudan Archives - Paid   

Sounds like: Washed Out, Empress Of, Baths

Song: Sudan Archives - Paid

What's so good?

Legendary LA label Stones Throw Records has many big names to boast, but some of their greatest gems are still small – like Sudan Archives. One of their newer and younger signees, she has just released the experimental and hypnotic “Paid,” the second single from her forthcoming debut EP (out July 14). A self-taught violinist and vocalist from Ohio, Sudan Archives has already been making waves with her unique sound. The 23-year-old writes, plays, and produces all of her work, citing “Sudanese fiddlers, R&amp;B, West African rhythms, and experimental electronic music” as some of her inspirations. Her skill is in her ability to draw on a wide variety of influences without all of these elements being too overbearing altogether. The carefully minimalist sound is a breath of fresh air in a world of Sound Cloud noise.

1. Original post: Sudan Archives - Paid

2. Find more music on Indie Shuffle's Indie Music Blog.


          Africa: AU Summit 29 - Why Are Some Crises Not On the Agenda?   
[ISS] While the situations in South Sudan, Somalia and the Lake Chad Basin dominate the agenda of the African Union (AU), other crises seem to have been forgotten by the AU. In fact, no one seems willing to label them as such.
          By 2100, Refugees Would Be the Most Populous Country on Earth   
Poverty and deadly wars are the major drivers of displacement.

The UN Refugee Agency has announced the new figures for the world’s displaced: 65.9 million. That means that 65.9 million human beings live as refugees, asylum seekers or as internally displaced people. If the refugees formed a country, it would be the 21st largest state in the world, just after Thailand (68.2 million) and just ahead of the United Kingdom (65.5 million). But unlike these other states, refugees have few political rights and no real representation in the institutions of the world.

The head of the UN Refugee Agency, Filippo Grandi, recently said that most of the displacement comes as a result of war. "The world seems to have become unable to make peace," Grandi said. "So you see old conflicts that continue to linger, and new conflicts erupting, and both produce displacement. Forced displacement is a symbol of wars that never end."

Few continents are immune from the harsh reality of war. But the epicenter of war and displacement is along the axis of the Western-driven global war on terror and resource wars. The line of displacement runs from Afghanistan to South Sudan with Syria in between. Eyes are on Syria, where the war remains hot and the tensions over escalation intensify daily. But there is as deadly a civil war in South Sudan, driven in large part by a ferocious desire to control the country’s oil. Last year, 340,000 people fled South Sudan for refugee camps in neighboring Uganda. This is a larger displacement than from Syria.

Poverty is a major driver of displacement. It is what moves hundreds of thousands of people to try and cross the Sahara Desert and then the Mediterranean Sea for European pastures. But most who try this journey meet a deadly fate. Both the Sahara and the Mediterranean are dangerous. This week, the UN’s International Organisation for Migration (IOM) in Niger rescued 600 migrants from the Sahara, although 52 did not survive.

A 22-year-old woman from Nigeria was among those rescued. She was on a pick-up truck with 50 people. They left Agadez for Libya. ‘We were in the desert for ten days,’ she says. "After five days, the driver abandoned us. He left us with all of our belongings, saying he was going to pick us up in a couple of hours. But he never did." Forty-four of the migrants died. The six who remained struggled to safety. ‘We had to drink our own pee to survive,’ she said.

Getting to Libya is hard enough. But being in Libya is perilous. Violence against vulnerable migrants inside Libya continues to occur. The IOM reports the presence in Libya of ‘slave markets.’ Migrants who make it across the Sahara into Libya have told investigators that they find themselves in these slave markets where they are bought to be taken to private prisons and put to work or else sold back to their families if they can raise the high ransom payments. UNICEF reports incidents of rape and violence against women and children in these private prisons. One 15-year-old boy said of his time in a private prison, "Here they treat us like chickens. They beat us, they do not give us good water and good food. They harass us. So many people are dying here, dying from disease, freezing to death."

Danger lurks on the sea as well. This year already IOM reports least 2,108 deaths in the sea between Libya and Italy. This is the fourth year in a row that IOM has counted over 2,000 deaths by mid-year. Over the past five years, this averages out to about 10 deaths a day. Libya, broken by NATO’s war in 2011, remains a gateway for the vulnerable from various parts of Africa, countries damaged by IMF policies and by warfare. There is no expectation that the numbers of those on the march will decrease.

In a recent paper in The Lancet (June 2017), Paul Spiegel, formerly of the UN Refugee Agency suggests that the "humanitarian system was not designed to address the types of conflicts that are happening at present." With over 65 million people displaced, the various institutions of the UN and of the NGO world are simply not capable of managing the crisis.

"It is not simply overstretched," Spiegel wrote of the humanitarian system, "it is no longer fit for purpose."

These are shattering words. One problem Spiegel identifies is the assumption that refugee flows are temporary, since wars will end at some point. What happens when wars and occupations are permanent? People either have to live for generations in refugee camps or they will seek, through dangerous passages, flight to the West. He gives the example of Iran, which absorbed over a million Afghan refugees without using the camp strategy. They simply allowed the Afghans into Iranian society and absorbed them by putting money into their various social schemes (such as education and health). Spiegel also points out that refugees must be part of the designing the process for humanitarian aid. These are good suggestions, but they are not going to be possible with the limited funds available for refugees and with the crisis level of activity that detains the humanitarian agencies.

Spiegel does not deal with one of the great problems for humanitarianism: the persistence of war and the theory that more war—or the current euphemism, security—is the answer to humanitarian crises. This January, over 1,000 people tried to scale the large barrier that divides Morocco from the Spanish enclave of Ceuta. Looking at that barrier, one is reminded of the idea that walls will somehow prevent migration, a view driven by President Donald Trump. Violence met the migrants, a mirror of the violence that was visited among migrants along the spinal cord of Eastern Europe last year. Walls, police forces and military interventions are all seductive to an imagination that forgets why people migrate and that they are human beings on the run with few other options. There is a view that security barriers and security forces will raise the price of migrant and deter future migrants. This is a silly illusion. Migration is dangerous already. That has not stopped anyone. More humane thinking is necessary.

It is important therefore that the UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed told a meeting on the Sahel on June 28 that the world leaders need to "avoid a disproportionate emphasis on security" when dealing with the multiple crises in the Sahara region and north of it. "No purely military solution" can work against transnational organized crime, violent extremism and terrorism, nor against poverty and hopelessness. Underlying causes are not being addressed, and indeed the surface reactions—to bomb more—only create more problems, not less.

In the July issue of Land Use Policy, professors Charles Geisler and Ben Currens estimate that by 2100 there will be 2 billion refugees as a result of climate change. These numbers are staggering. They are an inevitable future. By then, refugees will be the largest country on earth—nomads, seeking shelter from destruction of climate and capitalism, from rising seas and wars of greed.

 

Related Stories


          Alkollü kafadarlar ortalığı bir birine kattı   
Bursa’nın İznik ilçesinde, sahilde alkol alan iki kafadar, daha sonra serinlemek için göle girdi. Gençlerin ikisi de aynı anda sudan çıktı. Fakat alkolün etkisiyle bir birlerini fark etmeyen gençler polisi ve jandarmayı ayağa kaldırdı.Akşam...
          Sudan: Ministry of Water Resources Allocates 136 Million Pounds for Removal of Silts and Grass From Irrigation Channels in Gezira Scheme   
[SNA] The Ministry of Water Resources, Irrigation and Electricity (MWRI) has allocated 136 million pounds to meet the needs of clearing the muds from the irrigation networks, removal of grasses and provision of machines and removal of high bridges.
          Does the aid industry have a sexual violence problem?   

In July, Megan Nobert publicly told her story of being drugged and raped by a fellow aid worker on a UN base in South Sudan.

Her case ignited discussion about the extent of sexual violence experienced by aid workers in the field, prompting conferences within the sector, online support platforms for those affected, and new research on the subject. 


          Una madre detenida por abandonar a su hija de 2 años en el interior del coche bajo los efectos de las altas temperaturas   
Viernes, 30 de Junio, 2017

Detenida la madre de una menor de 2 años, una mujer de 37 años de edad, acusada de abandono de menores. Fue la Policía Local de Almería quien detuvo a la mujer y quien auxilió a la criatura que se encontraba en el interior de un vehículo soportando altas temperaturas. Tuvieron que romper el cristal ante los sollozos de la pequeña.

A la llegada a la Comisaría, la madre aseguró que el tiempo que se ausentó de su vehículo fueron 5 minutos, pero los agentes gracias al ticket del aparcamiento constataron que no era cierta la versión de la madre.

La menor fue atendida en el Complejo Hospitalario Torrecárdenas de Almería, para superar el proceso de hidratación.

  • encontraron a una menor de 2 años que se encontraba "llorando, sudando y con dificultad respiratoria, sujeta a una sillita".
  • la niña presentaba una "temperatura corporal bastante alta".
  • le echaron "agua en las manos y en la nuca" para hidratarla hasta que los médicos del 061 pudieron atenderla.
  • Los agentes detuvieron a la madre por un presunto delito de abandono de familia y dieron cuenta al Servicio de Atención a la Familia (SAF) de la Policía Nacional.


artículo completo
Fuente:
Detenida por dejar a su hija de tan sólo 2 años una hora en el coche al sol
http://www.clm24.es/articulo/sucesos/detenida-dejar-hija-tan-solo-2-anos-hora-coche-sol/20170623101314163509.html
          Deutliche Kürzungen im UN-Budget für Blauhelm-Einsätze   

Unter dem Druck vor allem der USA werden die Vereinten Nationen ihre Finanzmittel für Blauhelm-Mission voraussichtlich deutlich kürzen. das trifft besonders die sudanesische Region Darfur und die Demokratische Republik Kongo.

The post Deutliche Kürzungen im UN-Budget für Blauhelm-Einsätze appeared first on EURACTIV.de.


          Aktuelle Vita 2012 Jazz Pianist Uli Lenz   
Vita Jazz Pianist Uli Lenz

In Frankfurt am Main geboren, begann er mit dem Klavierspiel im Alter von vier Jahren.
In den 1970ern studierte er klassisches Klavier, Komposition und Cello zunächst an Dr. Hoch's Konservatorium, anschliessend an der Staatlichen Hochschule für Musik und
Darstellende Kunst in Frankfurt am Main. Nachts spielte er Jazz in Clubs und Striptease Bars.

In den '80ern tourte Lenz als Begleiter bekannter Saxophonisten durch Frankreich, Spanien, Italien und Israel. Er spielte in der Berliner Clubscene und konzertierte als Solo Pianist auf dem
Berliner JazzFest und bei Jazz Ost West Nürnberg. Er nahm das Piano Solo Album Midnight Candy auf. Solo bereiste er Israel, die Mittelmeerregion und Osteuropa.
1887 war er in der New Yorker Clubscene tätig.

Im Rahmen des New Yorker Hennessy Village Jazz Festivals nahm Lenz 1988 das Trioalbum Live at Sweet Basil mit dem Bassisten Cecil McBee und dem Schlagzeuger Joe Chambers auf.

1989 konzertierte er im Trio mit dem Bassisten Günter Lenz und dem Schlagzeuger Allen
Blairman auf dem Montreux Jazz Festival.

In den '90ern arbeitete Lenz u. a. mit Steve Grossman und Abbey Lincoln.In dieser Dekade gastierte er als Solist weltweit auf internationalen Festivals, unternahm ausgedehnte Konzertreisen. Er bespielte Alben sowohl mit verschiedenen Co-Akteuren, mit dem Saxophonisten Johannes Barthelmes (Konzert der Verlorenen Söhne 1992 und Trane's Tree 1993), mit der Sängerin Patricia Nomakosazana Dhlamini (Trouble in Paradise 1993), mit dem Bassisten Ed Schuller und dem Schlagzeuger Victor Jones (Echoes of Mandela 1997), als auch Piano Solo (Love Channel 1995). 1997 formte Lenz ein Trio mit dem Bassisten Pepe Berns und dem Schlagzeuger Thomas Alkier.
1999 unterschrieb Lenz einen Exclusivvertrag mit dem New Yorker Label Arkadia. Während seiner vielen Afrikagastspiele erwarb sich Lenz den Beinamen "Der auf den Tasten tanzt".

2001 nahm Lenz mit dem Bassisten Ira Coleman, dem Schlagzeuger Horacio "El Negro" Hernandez und dem Gastsolisten TK Blue am Saxophon das Album Rainmaker's Dance für Arkadia auf.
Die Kritiker zählen Rainmaker's Dance zu den besten Jazz CD's der Dekade ab 2000. 2002 konzertierte er im Duo mit Horacio "El Negro" Hernandez in Jungle Dance, einem Exclusivkonzert für DeutschlandRadio Berlin.

In der Folge nahm Lenz weitere Duette mit Nomakosazana und Triojazz mit Ed Schuller und dem Schlagzeuger John Betsch auf. 2005 begann eine langjährige Zusammenarbeit mit dem französischen Saxophonisten François Jeanneau. Mit Jeanneau nahm Lenz Duette auf und bereiste
Russland, Brasilien, Indien, Pakistan und Teile Afrikas.

2007 gründete Lenz das Trio 105 Jazz mit dem Bassisten Gerhard Kubach
und dem Schlagzeuger Zam Johnson. Das Trio unternahm Tourneen durch Russland, den Sudan und Ägypten.

Gegenwärtig setzt Lenz seine Tourneetätigkeit mit François Jeanneau, Ed Schuller, 105 Jazz und als Solo Pianist fort. Er unternimmt auch Tourneen für das Auswärtige Amt, das Goethe-Institut und die
Alliance Française.

Aktuelle Vita Jazzpianzst Uli Lenz
http://UliLenz.com
Uli on Facebook
Berlin den 15. Februar 2012

          105Lenz – Kubuach – Johnson   


open Air Konzert im Blue-Nile-Sailing-Club Khartum/Sudan
105 lenz kubach johnson

von : http://picasaweb.google.com/lando.doublebass/EminenceAndChristopherBassPlayers#5419530939583545794

Thank you
Lando



          South Sudan in Focus - June 30, 2017   
Fighting breaks out in Morobo County despite the signing of a controversial peace agreement between Yei River State authorities and a breakaway faction of the SPLA-IO; South Sudan’s government may withhold permission for aid workers to deliver assistance to areas controlled by rebels; and the European Union donates twenty million euros to encourage South Sudanese teachers to continue their work during the country’s economic crisis.
          American College of Education to Feature Wendi Dwyer as Keynote Speaker at Summer Commencement   

American College of Education’s summer commencement will be Saturday, July 19 in Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois, featuring Wendi Dwyer, executive director of Lost Boys Rebuilding Southern Sudan, as keynote speaker.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11927149.htm


          Books: Sudanese Colloquial Arabic for Beginners, Fourth Edition   
This book was designed to enable someone with no previous knowledge of Arabic to learn to speak Sudanese Colloquial Arabic, also known as Khartoum Arabic. The approach used is eclectic, using a combination of dialogues, drills, grammatical explanation, role plays and ideas for conversation, to help the various kinds of learner, since not everyone acquires a language in the same way. There are also vocabulary lists for each lesson, and a glossary of all words used. People who have previously u
          Refugee Resettlement Agencies: Now What?    

The revised travel restrictions now going into effect for six majority-Muslim nations means new questions and confusion for local resettlement agencies who were ready to welcome refugees in the coming months. 

"The banning of grandmothers, of unaccompanied children, is a disgrace," said Alison Millan, the New Jersey resettlement director for the International Rescue Committee. "And we're really just waiting on additional guidance on what the Supreme Court's decision means."

Millan and her colleagues in Elizabeth, NJ, spent the last few days sifting through paperwork involving more than 100 refugees from around the world whom they expected to resettle into homes in North Jersey. The agency was trying to figure out who exactly was banned from entering the country, given the Supreme Court's ruling this week that those coming from six majority-Muslim nations must have close United States ties, like immediate family, to enter the country.

It is unclear how the Trump Administration will implement the policy, given that it is a temporary fix until the justices make a final decision on the entirety of the travel issue in the fall. But nationally, the International Rescue Committee estimates that about 1,900 of the 2,500 refugees it expected to resettle will not meet the new requirements.

So far this year, the International Rescue Committee in New Jersey has resettled 86 Syrians and three Sudanese. Both Syria and Sudan are on the list of countries with travel restrictions.

Another Sudanese is booked to arrive in New Jersey next week. "We hope all goes well with his arrival," Millan said. 


          BREAKING: As Nwankwo bows out, FG appoints Oniha as DMO chief   

Acting President Yemi Osinbajo on Friday approved the appointment of Mrs. Patience Oniha as the new Director-General of Debt Management Office (DMO). The Minister of Finance, Mrs Kemi Adeosun announced the appointment in Abuja.

Oniha, from Edo State, takes over from the former Director General, Dr. Abraham Nwankwo who retired after serving for two terms of five years each. The handover formalities took place in a brief ceremony at the DMO office in Abuja.

Oniha retired as a director in the agency, served in the Efficiency Unit of the Ministry of Finance before her recent appointment as DMO Chief Executive.

The new DG contributed greatly to the success DMO achieved in the last 10 years.

During that period, DMO scored a number of firsts in its operational efforts to manage the country’s debt profile. These include the establishment of 37 sub-national Debt Management Departments for the 36 states and the FCT, culminating in the construction of the first-ever comprehensive and areliable Domestic Debt Database for all the states and the FCT in 2012; putting in place Primary Dealing-Market Making (PDMM) system for the FGN Bonds, enabling two-way quotes in the trading of FGN Bonds and, therefore, the introduction of a vibrant and liquid Secondary Market for FGN Bonds; listing of FGN Bonds on the Nigerian Stock Exchange; inclusion of Nigeria's Sovereign Bond in Global Market Indices, the JP Morgan Index and the Barclays Capital Index; issuing of Nigeria's Eurobond in the International Capital Market and its listing and trading on the London Stock Exchange; issuing of Nigeria's Sovereign Retail Bonds, the FGN Savings Bond and its listing on the Nigerian Stock Exchange and on the FMDQ OTC Exchange.

Others are issuing of Nigeria's Diaspora Bond and the first-ever registration of Nigeria to access the Unites States financial market under the stringent U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rules and regulations; designing and implementing Nigeria's National Debt Management Framework; Introducing the soon to be launched first-ever Nigeria's Sovereign Non-Interest Bearing Bond: the Sukuk as well as exporting of Public Debt Management services through capacity-building support to other African countries, including the Sudan, Zimbabwe, South Sudan, Kenya and Uganda.

Mrs Oniha is expected to consolidate on these achievements.

The post BREAKING: As Nwankwo bows out, FG appoints Oniha as DMO chief appeared first on TheIcon.


          Significado de sudanita por FEDE   
SUDANITA: Fiebre del África Tropical que termina a veces por manía homicida....
          Joy and pain in Africa   
Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda and Sudan are among the teams through to the final round of CAF qualifying, but Senegal and Congo DR are out.
          Who's Allowed Into The US Under The Revised Travel Ban   
Earlier this week, the US Supreme Court ruled that parts of Donald Trump's travel ban were acceptable, leading the State Department to create a set of new guidelines on the ban, which applies to nationals from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, with a few exceptions. To travel to the US from those six Muslim-majority countries, travellers must prove they have a "bona fide relationship" with "a person or entity in the United States" that was "formed in the ordinary course, rather than for the purpose of evading" the ban. The guidelines are now being enforced as of this morning. More »
   
 
 

          Travel Ban Update: U.S. State Department Issues New Guidelines Involving Close, Existing Relationships Within U.S.   
by Raj Rathour, Esq. and Jennifer Grady, Esq. On June 29, 2017, the U.S. State Department began implementing President Trump’s new visa criteria based in Executive Order 13780. The revised criteria bars U.S. entry for 90 days, for citizens without prior connections to the United States from six Muslim-majority countries: Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, … Continue reading
          Everything You Need to Know About the Travel Ban   

U.S. President Donald Trump's administration reversed a decision late on Thursday and said fiancés would be considered close family members and therefore allowed to travel to the United States as its revised travel ban took effect.

The U.S. State Department concluded "upon further review, fiancés would now be included as close family members," said a State Department official who requested anonymity.

The Trump administration had previously decided, on the basis of its interpretation of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling, that grandparents, grandchildren and fiancés traveling from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen would be barred from obtaining visas while the ban was in place.

The 90-day ban took effect at 8 p.m. EDT (0000 GMT Friday), along with a 120-day ban on all refugees.

On Monday, the Supreme Court revived parts of Trump's travel ban on people from the six Muslim-majority countries, narrowing the scope of lower court rulings that had blocked parts of a March 6 executive order and allowing his temporary ban to go into effect for people with no strong ties to the United States.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security, who also requested anonymity, said it would be updating its guidance to state that fiancés would not be barred from obtaining visas while the ban was in place.

The Supreme Court exempted from the ban travelers and refugees with a "bona fide relationship" with a person or entity in the United States. As an example, the court said those with a "close familial relationship" with someone in the United States would be covered.

The state of Hawaii asked a federal judge in Honolulu on Thursday evening to determine whether the Trump administration had interpreted the court's decision too narrowly.

Hawaii said in a court filing that the U.S. government intended to violate the Supreme Court's instructions by improperly excluding from the United States people who actually have a close family relationship to U.S. persons, echoing criticism from immigrant and refugee groups.

Hawaii called the refusal to recognize grandparents and other relatives as an acceptable family relationship "a plain violation of the Supreme Court's command."

Hawaii's Attorney General Doug Chin asked U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson in Honolulu, who blocked Trump's travel ban in March, to issue an order "as soon as possible" clarifying how the Supreme Court's ruling should be interpreted.

Watson ordered the Justice Department to respond to Hawaii's request by Monday, and said he would allow Hawaii to reply by July 6.

'Keep Fighting'

A senior U.S. official did not answer directly when asked how barring grandparents or grandchildren would make the United States safer, but instead pointed to Trump's guidance to pause "certain travel while we review our security posture."

The U.S. government expected "things to run smoothly" and "business as usual" at U.S. ports of entry, another senior U.S. official told reporters.

A handful of immigration lawyers gathered at Dulles International Airport outside Washington on Thursday in case of any problems.

"We're going to keep fighting this ban, even if it applies very narrowly," said Sirine Shebaya, a senior staff attorney at Muslim Advocates. "It's still a Muslim ban, and it's still trying to send a message to a whole community that they're not welcome here."

The administration said refugees who have agreements with resettlement agencies but not close family in the United States would not be exempted from the ban, likely sharply limiting the number of refugees allowed entry in coming months.

Hawaii said in its court filing it was "preposterous" not to consider a formal link with a resettlement agency a qualifying relationship. Refugee resettlement agencies had expected that their formal links with would-be refugees would qualify as "bona fide."

The administration's decision likely means that few refugees beyond a 50,000-cap set by Trump would be allowed into the country this year. A U.S. official said that, as of Wednesday evening, 49,009 refugees had been allowed into the country this fiscal year. The State Department said refugees scheduled to arrive through July 6 could still enter.

Trump first announced a temporary travel ban on Jan. 27, calling it a counterterrorism measure to allow time to develop better security vetting. The order caused chaos at airports, as officials scrambled to enforce it before it was blocked by courts. Opponents argued that the measure discriminated against Muslims and that there was no security rationale for it.

A revised version of the ban was also halted by courts.

The State Department guidance, distributed to all U.S. diplomatic posts on Wednesday evening and seen by Reuters, fleshed out the Supreme Court's ruling about people who have a "bona fide" relationship with an individual or entity in the United States.

It defined a close familial relationship as being a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling, including step-siblings and other step-family relations.

A department cable said grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, fiancés, "and any other 'extended' family members" were not considered close family.

The guidelines also said workers with offers of employment from a company in the United States or a lecturer addressing U.S. audiences would be exempt from the ban, but that arrangements such as a hotel reservation would not be considered bona fide relationships. {eoa}

© 2017 Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.


          TİKA'dan Sudan'da eğitim merkezine yardım   
Türk İşbirliği ve Koordinasyon Ajansı Başkanlığı (TİKA), Sudan'da Hayrat İnsani Yardım Derneği tarafından tadilatı tamamlanan Yetim Eğitim Merkezine donanım desteğinde bulundu.
          Financial Advisor at Britam   
Britam is a leading diversified financial services group, listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange. The group has interests across the Eastern and Southern Africa region, with operations in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, South Sudan, Mozambique and Malawi. The group offers a wide range of financial products and services in Insurance, Asset management, Banking and Property. Our Mission is to provide outstanding financial services to our customers. Our Vision is to be the most trusted financial service partner. We aim to provide our clients, with an unmatched offering, ensuring first class solutions that help secure the future.
          Improved Neonatal Mortality at a District Hospital in Aweil, South Sudan   
Abstract
Neonatal deaths comprise a growing proportion of global under-five mortality. However, data from the highest-burden areas is sparse. This descriptive retrospective study analyses the outcomes of all infants exiting the Médecins sans Frontières-managed neonatal unit in Aweil Hospital, rural South Sudan from 2011 to 2014. A total of 4268 patients were treated over 4 years, with annual admissions increasing from 687 to 1494. Overall mortality was 13.5% (n = 576), declining from 18.7% to 11.1% (p for trend <0.001). Newborns weighing <2500 g were at significantly increased mortality risk compared with babies ≥2500 g (odds ratio = 2.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.9–2.71, p < 0.001). Leading causes of death included sepsis (49.7%), tetanus (15.8%), respiratory distress (12.8%) and asphyxia (9.2%). Tetanus had the highest case fatality rate (49.7%), followed by perinatal asphyxia (26.5%), respiratory distress (20.4%) and neonatal sepsis (10.5%). Despite increasing admissions, overall mortality declined, indicating that survival of these especially vulnerable infants can be improved even in a basic-level district hospital programme.

          IDF REOPENS RESITIVE BORDER AREA IN GOLAN HEIGHTS TO CIVILIANS.   
JEWISH KING JESUS IS COMING AT THE RAPTURE FOR US IN THE CLOUDS-DON'T MISS IT FOR THE WORLD.THE BIBLE TAKEN LITERALLY- WHEN THE PLAIN SENSE MAKES GOOD SENSE-SEEK NO OTHER SENSE-LEST YOU END UP IN NONSENSE.GET SAVED NOW- CALL ON JESUS TODAY.THE ONLY SAVIOR OF THE WHOLE EARTH - NO OTHER. 1 COR 15:23-JESUS THE FIRST FRUITS-CHRISTIANS RAPTURED TO JESUS-FIRST FRUITS OF THE SPIRIT-23 But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ’s at his coming.ROMANS 8:23 And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body.(THE PRE-TRIB RAPTURE)

LUKE 21:28-29
28 And when these things begin to come to pass,(ALL THE PROPHECY SIGNS FROM THE BIBLE) then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption (RAPTURE) draweth nigh.
29 And he spake to them a parable; Behold the fig tree,(ISRAEL) and all the trees;(ALL INDEPENDENT COUNTRIES)
30 When they now shoot forth, ye see and know of your own selves that summer is now nigh at hand.(ISRAEL LITERALLY BECAME AND INDEPENDENT COUNTRY JUST BEFORE SUMMER IN MAY 14,1948.)

JOEL 2:3,30
3 A fire devoureth (ATOMIC BOMB) before them;(RUSSIAN-ARAB-MUSLIM ARMIES AGAINST ISRAEL) and behind them a flame burneth: the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness; yea, and nothing shall escape them.
30 And I will shew wonders in the heavens and in the earth, blood, and fire, and pillars of smoke.(ATOMIC BOMB AFFECT)

ZECHARIAH 14:12-13
12 And this shall be the plague wherewith the LORD will smite all the people that have fought against Jerusalem; Their flesh shall consume away while they stand upon their feet,(DISOLVED FROM ATOMIC BOMB) and their eyes shall consume away in their holes,(DISOLVED FROM ATOMIC BOMB) and their tongue shall consume away in their mouth.(DISOLVED FROM ATOMIC BOMB)(BECAUSE NUKES HAVE BEEN USED ON ISRAELS ENEMIES)(GOD PROTECTS ISRAEL AND ALWAYS WILL)
13 And it shall come to pass in that day, that a great tumult from the LORD shall be among them; and they shall lay hold every one on the hand of his neighbour, and his hand shall rise up against the hand of his neighbour.(1/2-3 BILLION DIE IN WW3)(THIS IS AN ATOMIC BOMB EFFECT)

EZEKIEL 20:47
47 And say to the forest of the south, Hear the word of the LORD; Thus saith the Lord GOD; Behold, I will kindle a fire in thee, and it shall devour every green tree in thee, and every dry tree: the flaming flame shall not be quenched, and all faces from the south to the north shall be burned therein.

ZEPHANIAH 1:18
18 Neither their silver nor their gold shall be able to deliver them in the day of the LORD'S wrath; but the whole land shall be devoured by the fire of his jealousy: for he shall make even a speedy riddance of all them that dwell in the land.

MALACHI 4:1
1 For, behold, the day cometh, that shall burn as an oven;(FROM ATOMIC BOMBS) and all the proud, yea, and all that do wickedly, shall be stubble: and the day that cometh shall burn them up, saith the LORD of hosts, that it shall leave them neither root nor branch.

And here are the bounderies of the land that Israel will inherit either through war or peace or God in the future. God says its Israels land and only Israels land. They will have every inch God promised them of this land in the future.
Egypt east of the Nile River, Saudi Arabia, Israel, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, The southern part of Turkey and the Western Half of Iraq west of the Euphrates. Gen 13:14-15, Psm 105:9,11, Gen 15:18, Exe 23:31, Num 34:1-12, Josh 1:4.ALL THIS LAND ISRAEL WILL DEFINATELY OWN IN THE FUTURE, ITS ISRAELS NOT ISHMAELS LAND.12 TRIBES INHERIT LAND IN THE FUTURE

IDF reopens restive border area on Golan Heights to civilians-Region around Quneitra had been declared off-limits as stray fire incidents stoked tensions with Syria-By Times of Israel staff June 28, 2017, 9:06 am

The Israeli military on Wednesday reopened a border-adjacent area in the Golan Heights to civilian access, two days after it was declared off-limits amid a series of incidents of errant Syrian fire hitting Israeli territory.The IDF had declared several “crowd gathering points” in the area of Quneitra as closed military zones on Monday. Farmers were allowed in to work in their fields, though they were barred from coming near the border fence itself.In the three days prior to the ban there were three incidents of errant fire hitting Israel. The IDF responded with force, targeting Syrian army installations, which Israel holds responsible for all incidents originating from the civil-war-torn country.Defense Minister Avidgor Liberman said Monday that Israel has “no intention of launching a military operation” against Syria or rebel groups operating within it even as tensions spiraled.Speaking at the Knesset Defense and Foreign Affairs committee, Liberman rejected predictions made by some in Israel’s political echelon that the next conflict with either Hezbollah in the north or Hamas in the south is just around the corner.Around 10 mortar shells from Syria struck the Golan Heights on Saturday, prompting an Israeli response that reportedly killed two Syrian soldiers.On Sunday, several more projectiles hit Israel in what the army said was spillover fire from fighting between regime forces and rebels. The IDF again responded, confirming it targeted a Syrian military vehicle. Arabic media reports said five people were injured in the Israeli raid.Earlier Monday the IDF said that stray fire from Syria reportedly hit a United Nations peacekeeping position in the Golan Heights. No injuries were reported. The army launched searches following reports that two mortars had landed on the Israeli side of the frontier, but no signs of shelling were found. Instead, “heavy machine gun bullet holes were identified in a UNDOF post near Zivanit, adjacent to the border,” the army said.The United Nations Disengagement Observer Force monitors a 1974 ceasefire between Israel and Syria on the Golan Heights.Syria responded Sunday to Israel’s strikes with its own warnings-“The General Command warned against the risks posed by such hostile acts and holds the Israeli enemy responsible for the serious repercussions if such acts reoccur under any pretext, affirming determination to crush terrorist groups which are the Israeli enemy’s proxy in the area,” Syria’s military said in a statement.

Assad said to visit Iranian-run chemical weapons center-Syrian opposition reports US administration learned Assad planning another sarin attack-By Sue Surkes June 28, 2017, 12:05 pm-THE TIMES OF ISRAEL

A Syrian opposition news site reported Wednesday that the country’s embattled president, Bashar Assad, recently visited a missile and chemical weapons research station run by Iran on Syrian soil.The report followed an announcement by the Pentagon on Tuesday that it had detected “active preparations” by Syria for a chemical weapons attack, and a White House statement that the Syrian government would “pay a heavy price” if it carried out such an assault.Quoting a non-government source with close ties to the White House, Zaman al-Wasl reported that the US administration had been tipped off that Syrian authorities were planning a possible sarin gas attack in either the east or south of Syria, where Assad’s forces and its backers have suffered recent setbacks against rebels in the sixth year of the civil war.Assad is believed to have used sarin gas in an weapons attack that killed dozens of people in Idlib province on April 4, as well as in early attacks on civilians since the war began.The station, to be inaugurated by the end of this year, works on developing long-range missiles and is located in a valley between the Hama and Tartus provinces, close to the Syrian border with Lebanon, the report said.The report said Assad’s visit to the station followed a rare stop in the historically anti-Assad city of Hama, some 213 kilometers (132 miles) north of Damascus, where he delivered prayers for Eid al-Fitr, marking the end of the Ramadan fast.The visit to Hama indicated that the Syrian leader was feeling more confident about his position.Responding to the Pentagon’s assessment, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Tuesday that “such threats to Syria’s legitimate leaders are unacceptable.”Russia is Assad’s key backer and sided with him when he denied responsibility for the April chemical attack in Idlib province.That attack was followed by a US cruise missile strike on a Syrian government air base.

Iran says US travel ban is ‘racist’ and ‘unfair’-Foreign Ministry spokesman complains Washington is ‘closing its eyes to main perpetrators of terrorist acts’-By AP June 28, 2017, 12:05 pm-THE TIMES OF ISRAEL

TEHRAN, Iran — Iran said the US Supreme Court’s decision to reinstate parts of a travel ban applied to six Muslim-majority countries is “racist” and “unfair.”Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Ghasemi was quoted by state TV Wednesday as saying it is “regrettable” that Washington “closes its eyes to the main perpetrators of terrorist acts in the US,” without elaborating.The Supreme Court on Monday allowed US President Donald Trump to forge ahead with a limited version of his ban on travelers from Iran, Syria, Sudan, Yemen, Libya and Somalia. The justices will hear full arguments in October in the case.Critics say the ban is intended to meet Trump’s campaign promise of keeping Muslims out of the country. The administration says the restrictions are needed to keep out terrorists while it tightens vetting procedures.

Palestinian with knife arrested at West Bank checkpoint-Russia said negotiating Golan safe zones with Israel, US and Jordan; 6 suspected Islamic State jihadists arrested in Europe-By Tamar Pileggi June 28, 2017, 2:17 pm-THE TIMES OF ISRAEL

14:55-AIPAC delegation coming to Israel to discuss Western Wall reversal with PM-A delegation of senior members from the American pro-Israel lobby AIPAC are reportedly traveling to Israel to discuss with Netanyahu his government’s decision to freeze the implementation of a hard-won agreement to create an official pluralistic worship area at the Western Wall.According to the Walla news site, the delegation includes AIPAC President Lillian Pinkus and Vice CEO Richard Fishman. They are expected to meet with the prime minister tomorrow.The government’s decision to suspend the pluralistic pavilion, along with advancing a bill granting the ultra-Orthodox a de facto monopoly over conversions to Judaism in Israel, was met with outrage by many US Jews.14:46-Hamas to create buffer zone with Egypt to improve ties-Hamas says bulldozers in Gaza are creating a 100-meter-wide (330-foot) buffer zone along the Egyptian border as part of the Palestinian terrorist group’s efforts to combat extremists and improve ties with Cairo.The Hamas-run Interior Ministry says the creation of a 12-kilometer-long (7.5-mile) corridor was agreed upon in recent face-to-face negotiations with Egyptian officials. It expressed hope that Egypt would reopen the Rafah border crossing with Gaza on a regular basis once the buffer zone is complete.Egypt has long accused Gaza’s Hamas rulers of aiding an insurgency in the northern Sinai Peninsula, allegations denied by Hamas. Egypt and Israel have imposed a blockade on Gaza since Hamas seized power in 2007.— with AP-14:27-6 suspected IS jihadists arrested across Europe-Six suspected members of the Islamic State group are arrested in Spain, Britain and Germany in an operation led by Spanish authorities investigating a jihadist recruiting network, the Spanish interior ministry says.The raids are targeting a group based on the island of Majorca and led by an Islamist imam, who was arrested in Britain, the ministry says in a statement.The imam, 44, was the target of a European arrest warrant and seized by the West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit on behalf of the Spanish authorities.“The investigation focuses on terrorism material created for use online,” the West Midlands police says, adding that prosecutors would seek his extradition to Spain later today.— AFP-14:26-Russia said negotiating Golan safe zones with Israel, US and Jordan-Russia is negotiating safe zones in southern Syria with Israel, Jordan and the US, Army Radio reports.The talks are focused on establishing areas of operations for the respective militaries in the Syrian side of the Golan Heights near Israel’s northern border.Citing Russian media reports, the negotiations were called following four recent US-led coalition airstrikes on regime targets in the area.14:17-Palestinian with knife arrested at West Bank checkpoint-A Palestinian woman is caught with a knife at a checkpoint near the West Bank city of Bethlehem.According to reports, the 36-year-old tells security forces that she planned to carry out a stabbing attack in Jerusalem.The suspect is taken in for questioning.

REBUILT 3RD TEMPLE

REVELATION 11:1-2
1 And there was given me a(MEASURING) reed like unto a rod: and the angel stood, saying, Rise, and measure the temple of God, and the altar, and them that worship therein.
2 But the court which is without the temple leave out,(TO THE WORLD NATIONS) and measure it not; for it is given unto the Gentiles: and the holy city shall they tread under foot forty and two months.(JERUSALEM DIVIDED BUT THE 3RD TEMPLE ALLOWED TO BE REBUILT)

DANIEL 9:27
27 And he( THE ROMAN,EU PRESIDENT) shall confirm the covenant with many for one week:(1X7=7 YEARS) and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease,(3 1/2 yrs in TEMPLE SACRIFICES STOPPED) and for the overspreading of abominations he shall make it desolate, even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate.

MICAH 4:1-5
1 But in the last days it shall come to pass, that the mountain of the house of the LORD shall be established in the top of the mountains, and it shall be exalted above the hills; and people shall flow unto it.
2  And many nations shall come, and say, Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, and to the house of the God of Jacob; and he will teach us of his ways, and we will walk in his paths: for the law shall go forth of Zion, and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.
3  And he shall judge among many people, and rebuke strong nations afar off; and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruninghooks: nation shall not lift up a sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.
4  But they shall sit every man under his vine and under his fig tree; and none shall make them afraid: for the mouth of the LORD of hosts hath spoken it.
5  For all people will walk every one in the name of his god, and we will walk in the name of the LORD our God for ever and ever.

DANIEL 11:31
31 And arms shall stand on his part, and they shall pollute the sanctuary of strength, and shall take away the daily sacrifice, and they shall place the abomination that maketh desolate.(3RD TEMPLE REBUILT)

DANIEL 12:11
11 And from the time that the daily sacrifice shall be taken away,(AT THE MIDPOINT OF THE TRIBULATION PERIOD)(3RD TEMPLE SACRIFICES STOPPED BY DICTATOR) and the abomination that maketh desolate set up,(TO WORSHIP THE DICTATOR OR DIE) there shall be a thousand two hundred and ninety days.(1,290 DAYS)(AN EXTRA 30 DAYS AT THE END OF THE 7 YEAR TRIBULATION PERIOD FOR JESUS TO DESTROY THE ARMIES AGAINST JERUSALEM.AND TO JUDGE THE SHEEP AND GOAT NATIONS OF MATTHEW 25:31-46-HOW THEY TREATED ISRAEL DURING THE 7 YEAR TRIBULATION PERIOD.AND THEN I BELIEVE JESUS WILL REBUILD THE 4TH TEMPLE 25 MILES FROM THE CURRENT TEMPLE MOUNT.AND THEN JESUS RULES FOR THE 1,000 YEARS-THEN FOREVER FROM THAT 4TH TEMPLE.)

MATTHEW 24:15-16
15 When ye therefore shall see the abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet, stand in the holy place, (whoso readeth, let him understand:)(THE DICTATOR SITS IN THE REBUILT 3RD TEMPLE CALLING HIMSELF GOD AT THE MIDPOINT OR 3 1/2 YEAR PERIOD OF THE 7 YEAR TRIBULATION PERIOD.OR 7 YEAR PEACE TREATY BETWEEN ISRAEL-ARABS AND MANY OF DANIEL 9:27)
16 Then let them which be in Judaea flee into the mountains:

Israel’s consulates in the US gird for protests over Western Wall-Memo lays out strategy for explaining decision to suspend deal on prayer pavilion; some federations said to reevaluate contributions to Israel-By Sue Surkes June 28, 2017, 10:04 am-THE TIMES OF ISRAEL

The Foreign Ministry has reportedly instructed staff at its nine US consulates to prepare for mass Jewish protests following government decisions to suspend plans for a pluralistic prayer pavilion at Jerusalem’s Western Wall and to advance a bill granting the ultra-Orthodox a de facto monopoly over conversions to Judaism in Israel.A memo sent to the consulates on Monday, published by the Haaretz daily, called on staff to clarify what it said was “a great deal of misinformation” by stressing that a previous government decision to create the prayer pavilion “was not nullified but suspended,” that the suspension gave the government “the time and space needed to find a genuinely workable solution,” and that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — “compelled” to reach a decision because of an approaching High Court deadline — had actually refused the demand of ultra-Orthodox ministers to cancel rather than suspend the construction of the pavilion.The memo also laid part of the blame for the crisis on non-Orthodox Jews, saying that “for reasons, related to both sides, the current plan has proven unfeasible.” It also asserted that the prime minister remained committed to the principle that “all Jews should feel at home in Israel and at the Western Wall in particular.”The Foreign Ministry has been receiving reports of protests against the Western Wall decision from Jewish communities across America. One report from Chicago’s Israel consulate described “harsh messages of disappointment and pain,” according to Haaretz.Some people were implying that the decision could impact donations and political campaigns, the Haaretz report said.Another report, from the New York consulate, said that Gordon Hecker, CEO of the Columbus, Ohio, Jewish Federation, told Israel’s consul general in New York, Dani Dayan, that he planned to stop all donations to Israel from his federation.The same report said the CEO of the Northern New Jersey Jewish Federation, Jason Shames, said that the decision was likely to impact his federation’s relationships with the State of Israel.In an interview with The Times of Israel, Jewish Agency chairman Natan Sharansky said there was no difference between “freezing” and scrapping the agreement, and that the prime minister was “just playing with words.” He said Netanyahu had broken a painstakingly constructed relationship of trust with US Jewish leaders, and had put narrow coalition interests above the wider needs of the Jewish people.

There's 'unbelievable ignorance' in Israel, including in the government, about non-Orthodox Judaism-Sharansky: We may solve Western Wall and conversion crises. I’m not sure we can rebuild trust-Jewish Agency chairman, at forefront of incendiary dispute between Israel and Diaspora, decries PM’s actions, laments collapse of a painstakingly constructed relationship with Reform and Conservative leaders By David Horovitz June 28, 2017, 7:34 am-THE TIMES OF ISRAEL

Natan Sharansky, the chairman of the Jewish Agency, said he believes the two profound crises that have erupted in ties between Israel and much of the US Jewish community — over prayer at the Western Wall and conversion — can and will be resolved.In an interview with The Times of Israel, he said the legislation on conversion approved by ministers on Sunday — which would cement an ultra-Orthodox monopoly over conversions to Judaism in Israel — would likely not go through in its current format. From his contacts with ministers and Knesset members, he said, he does not believe Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu can muster a majority to pass the legislation in its current form.As for Netanyahu’s shock decision to freeze implementation of a painstakingly negotiated agreement to give non-Orthodox streams of Judaism a recognized, formal role in the oversight of a permanent, pluralistic prayer area slightly to the south of the main Western Wall prayer area, Sharansky said he believed a “formula” would be found to enable the agreement to go ahead.“You don’t have to call it ‘recognition,'” he posited. “But you do have to allow representatives of the Reform and Conservative to run the place where they pray. That’s the minimum condition from which all the negotiations started.” Sharansky said he couldn’t say what precise “formula” would be found, but “I believe that very quickly” it can be resolved.At the same time, he expressed deep disappointment in Netanyahu’s handling of the affair — saying the prime minister had put narrow coalition interests above the wider needs of the Jewish people. He noted, incidentally, that he did not believe the government would have fallen if Netanyahu had resisted ultra-Orthodox pressure on the issues.And he said that the precious trust that had been established between Israeli and Diaspora leaders, as the Western Wall compromise took shape in recent years, may have been damaged irrevocably.He also highlighted staggering ignorance among Israeli government ministers about Reform and Conservative Judaism — streams of Judaism with which the majority of American Jews are affiliated. “When I said to the government a year or two ago, Do you know that 85% of AIPAC supporters are Reform and Conservative Jews, half of the government were shocked. They really thought they were supporters of boycotts of Israel, all these crazies from J Street, Breaking the Silence. That’s all.”-I’m sure his coalition wouldn’t have fallen-Lots of Israelis are similarly ignorant, he added. “There are many Israelis, good Israelis, good Zionists, loving Jews, who believe that Reform is a kind of sect which destroyed Judaism from the inside in America and now they are looking for more places to destroy, because that is how they live, by destroying. That now they are trying to come here.Added Sharansky: “I say to them, You know, that’s exactly what anti-Semites were saying about Jews in Russia.”The Times of Israel spoke to Sharansky at his Jewish Agency office late on Tuesday afternoon. The following is an edited transcript:The Times of Israel: Do you think this crisis can be solved? And if so, how? Natan Sharansky: Look, this crisis has to be solved, because it’s too important for the future of our unity.On the one hand, it was very upsetting, it seemed awful, that just when our (Jewish Agency) Board of Governors started their meetings here, and were coming for a short visit with the government, these two decisions were taken, one after another — maybe the most painful decisions you could imagine for the American Jewish community.On the other hand, the timing could not be better, when you think about it: Imagine if it had happened two weeks later, or five weeks later. You wouldn’t have had angry representatives here of all the main communities, who immediately mobilized to work.We have a lot of big challenges — budget challenges, organizational challenges. These were all put aside. Everybody was mobilized. And we delivered a message.All of these (US Jewish leaders) were receiving a lot of emails from people in their communities who are angry, and were saying, Enough is enough. They had to make those messages heard. They were speaking to the ministers and members of Knesset, and explaining.What’s the solution — on the conversion law, and on the Western Wall? As regards the law, it has to be stopped. And yesterday, we had meetings with (Ministers) Naftali Bennett and Ayelet Shaked. I was speaking to all of them 15 minutes before the vote on the bill (in the cabinet on Sunday), and they didn’t understand (what the implications were). Now they understand and they’ve started looking for ways to change something (in the planned legislation).They say it is important to stop foreign workers coming here (and converting). But there are much simpler ways to deal with that.So it will be amended? We were in the Knesset today. Half of the people who were speaking to us about this were from the coalition. I don’t really understand how the prime minister is going to have a majority for this law. So I think it can be stopped.As to the Kotel, it’s more difficult, because it’s not Knesset legislation.But Tzachi Hanegbi (the minister charged by Netanyahu with resolving the crisis) who came today to speak to us, he changed tone. He said, the physical part (of the pavilion for pluralistic prayer) we will start implementing immediately. He said the other part (regarding its formal oversight), which is the problematic part, we’ll have to negotiate on how to implement it.That’s already different from ‘We’ll freeze it, we’ll stop it, we cannot do it.’(The difficult part) is the question of recognition (for non-Orthodox Judaism in the oversight of the pluralistic prayer area). The prime minister says, I recognize (the non-Orthodox streams of Judaism), but as a government, I cannot do it.He said, ‘My government can’t’? Bibi was very frank. He didn’t try to… (Sharansky wiggles his hands.) He said: I do believe that all the Jews are pulling for us, and I recognize all of them. But what to do? We have a coalition. Some of our (coalition) partners can’t recognize them. And they demand from us to cancel all the agreements (about the Western Wall). I’m not ready to cancel. I’m ready to freeze.Well, cancel or freeze, that’s just playing with words. I can’t explain that to a Reform rabbi in St Louis.So how do you solve it? I’ve already heard from the ministers, never mind members of Knesset, that we have to go back and talk about it. You don’t have to call it “recognition.” But you do have to allow representatives of the Reform and Conservatives to run the place where they pray. That’s the minimum condition from which all the negotiations started.I believe that with public opinion understanding this better and better, the pressure will grow, and it can be implemented.Whether it will be this or that (precise) formula, the thing is that it will be a respected place of prayer, where they don’t have to hide from anybody, and where they will be able to run their own prayer, and not have to depend on this government minister or that bureaucrat who today changes his opinions. That’s the minimum which is demanded.At this moment, the government decided not to implement it. I believe that very quickly, it can be changed.What is clear is that, despite the fact that this topic was so widely discussed in recent years, the majority of Israelis don’t understand it, and some people in the West don’t understand what we are talking about. We have now to accelerate our campaign of explaining.In the last couple of years, I was speaking a lot in Israel. I discovered unbelievable ignorance (when it comes to non-Orthodox Judaism). The prejudices…What do Israelis not know about non-Orthodox Judaism? There are many Israelis, good Israelis, good Zionists, loving Jews, who believe that Reform is a kind of sect which destroyed Judaism from the inside in America and now they are looking for more places to destroy, because that is how they live, by destroying. That now they are trying to come here.I say to them, You know, that’s exactly what anti-Semites were saying about Jews in Russia.When I said to the government a year or two ago, Do you know that 85% of AIPAC supporters are Reform and Conservative Jews, half of the government were shocked. They really thought they were supporters of boycotts of Israel, all these crazies from J Street, Breaking the Silence. That’s all.And what do you say? The truth is…The truth is that in the conditions of the Diaspora, to survive and not be assimilated is a big challenge. From the beginning, 200 years ago, when Jews started living among gentiles, and those of them who wanted to continue living actively among gentiles but to feel themselves Jewish at home, some of them went for different forms of Judaism.It’s not the place where I pray, the place where I talk to God. But it is the place where a lot of Jews, who want to stay being Jewish, are gathering.So the State of Israel, if it continues to say that it is home for all the Jews, definitely has to say to them: We want you. But we also want your communities, we want your rabbis, your grandchildren.So many Jews in the Diaspora say (to Israel), Be democratic like us. But they don’t understand that we’re doing something much (more challenging) than them: We are trying to be democratic in the Middle East.Equally, many Jews in Israel say (to the Diaspora), Be not assimilated like us. We’re religious or secular. But they don’t understand that (Diaspora Jews) are doing something much more difficult. How to not be assimilated in America is not the same as how to not be assimilated in Israel.They are using these tools (of different streams of Judaism). If we could invent tools now, at a time of the existence of the State of Israel, maybe we would invent different tools. But these are the tools that exist.Our prime minister, however, does understand the Diaspora. He does understand the non-Orthodox streams of Judaism. He does understand how much of a commitment there is to Israel. He must have known how this would play out. And I’m not sure his coalition would have fallen over this. He could have told the ultra-Orthodox parties: This is the deal.I’m sure his coalition wouldn’t have fallen.His advisers really failed, by not even telling him the timing was so bad. Which (paradoxically) is good. God forbid they had told him, and he’d done it two weeks later.But still…Still. I told him at this government meeting (on Sunday), which is what I say all over the world: Mr. Prime Minister, you know better than any other prime minister in Israel what is American Jewry. And that’s why you worked harder than any other (on this). Don’t undermine your own work.And he answered: I believe it. I feel it. I want it. But at this moment part of my coalition demands to do this. I’m doing something to save my coalition.That’s not exactly what he said, but that was his message. Very open.So he behaved like a politician who has to respond to the immediate need of the coalition.That contradicts with him as a Jewish leader who really knows, who understands the historical process and the importance of keeping the deep contact (with the Diaspora).I’m particularly sorry, because he had succeeded — and we did our best to help him — to build relations with the leaders of the Reform and Conservative movements during these negotiations which never before existed. There was a lot of trust. Direct telephone calls. Meetings. Cooperation. Coordination. And I felt great pride in this.I do believe that we can overcome these (current) crises. I’m not sure we will be able to restore this type of relationship and trust. And that’s a big loss.

          O CANADA AVOIDS GENDER NEUTRAL LIBERAL POLITICALLY CORRECT REDICULAS NONESENSE UNTILL NEXT YEAR AT LEAST.   
JEWISH KING JESUS IS COMING AT THE RAPTURE FOR US IN THE CLOUDS-DON'T MISS IT FOR THE WORLD.THE BIBLE TAKEN LITERALLY- WHEN THE PLAIN SENSE MAKES GOOD SENSE-SEEK NO OTHER SENSE-LEST YOU END UP IN NONSENSE.GET SAVED NOW- CALL ON JESUS TODAY.THE ONLY SAVIOR OF THE WHOLE EARTH - NO OTHER. 1 COR 15:23-JESUS THE FIRST FRUITS-CHRISTIANS RAPTURED TO JESUS-FIRST FRUITS OF THE SPIRIT-23 But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ’s at his coming.ROMANS 8:23 And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body.(THE PRE-TRIB RAPTURE)

Dreams of a gender-neutral O Canada are over — for now-[CBC]-YAHOONEWS-June 28, 2017

Canadians will not be singing a gender-neutral national anthem on Canada Day after a bill before Parliament to officially change the lyrics has stalled.The House of Commons overwhelmingly passed a private member's bill last summer that would alter the national anthem by replacing "in all thy sons command" with "in all of us command" as part of a push to strike gendered language from O Canada.Although the bill sailed through the House with government approval, Conservative senators opposed to the changes have scored a victory in the Red Chamber. A yearlong campaign successfully punted a vote on the bill until the fall, at the earliest, and even then the legislation faces an uncertain future."I'm trying to protect the tradition rather than, you know, water it down with a politically correct version that is historically inaccurate," Conservative Senator David Wells said in an interview with CBC News on Tuesday."I don't misrepresent why I'm [using parliamentary stall tactics] … I don't like this bill, and I will do what I can to ensure it doesn't pass."Wells and a number of other senators have said they oppose efforts to tinker with the lyrics written by a man long dead.(The lyrics have been changed since they were first penned by Robert Stanley Weir in 1908, but not since O Canada officially became the country's national anthem in 1980.) The late Liberal MP Mauril Bélanger introduced the bill, and many MPs backed the legislation as a salute to a colleague on his death bed."The bill was passed in the House compassionately and out of sadness for a dying colleague. While that is touching, it is not the way we make public policy in this country and it is not the way we do our legislation," Ontario Conservative Senator Lynn Beyak said.A flurry of amendments were introduced to the bill in the last few weeks of the parliamentary sitting — all failed to pass in the face of opposition from most Liberal and Independent senators — which dragged out debate considerably. Parliament rose for summer break before a final vote at third reading could be held.Ramona Lumpkin, the chancellor of Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax, and a strong proponent of the bill, said she was deeply disappointed by the developments."We're so close and I really regret that there are a few senators who seem to have dug in and decided to delay. I hope it's not a permanent block," said Lumpkin, in an interview with CBC News."It's not as if the words were brought down from Mount Sinai on stone tablets like the Ten Commandments, they are words created by humans and subject to change as our social and cultural conditions change, and thank goodness they do," she said.Wells said national symbols cannot be altered to simply adhere to the "flavour of the day." He said Canadians were not consulted by the government and that there hasn't been an adequate conversation about a fairly significant change."I'll be working my hardest to delay this bill until there's a full debate," he said. "I get a lot of emails, and many comments to me personally, from people who don't want to see the anthem change, who see it as a part of our tradition and who see this attempt to change it as political correctness run amok. It is a slippery slope. Calls for inclusion will always be there, but my belief is all Canadians are already included in the national anthem."He said pictures adorning the walls of the Senate depict men in combat during the First World War. "Would we now airbrush females into those pictures to accurately reflect what it might be today with those pieces of Canadians' history? My answer is no, that would be an abomination, and I think that's what it is with the anthem as well."If the bill is amended in the Senate it would be sent back to the House for another vote. As per parliamentary rules, because Bélanger is dead, MPs will have to unanimously agree to replace him as sponsor or the bill drops from the order paper; that is unlikely given entrenched opposition from some corners of the chamber."That worries me," Lumpkin said. "I know language matters and I talk to students and young women regularly who still feel their voice doesn't carry as strong as the voice of their male friends. I think the gesture, even though it's symbolic, would say a lot to those young women."The Liberal government could also choose to introduce legislation of its own — with the same wording — to avoid some of the problems that often befall private member's bills; namely, the government could invoke time allocation to prevent procedural time delays.

DANIEL 7:23-24
23 Thus he said, The fourth beast (EU,REVIVED ROME) shall be the fourth kingdom upon earth,(7TH WORLD EMPIRE) which shall be diverse from all kingdoms, and shall devour the whole earth, and shall tread it down, and break it in pieces.(TRADING BLOCKS-10 WORLD REGIONS/TRADE BLOCS)
24 And the ten horns out of this kingdom are ten kings(10 NATIONS-10 WORLD DIVISION WORLD GOVERNMENT) that shall arise: and another shall rise after them; and he shall be diverse from the first, and he shall subdue three kings.(EITHER THE EUROPEAN UNION DICTATOR BOOTS 3 COUNTRIES FROM THE EU OR THE DICTATOR TAKES OVER THE WORLD ECONOMY BY CONTROLLING 3 WORLD TRADE BLOCS)

REVELATION 17:9-13
9 And here is the mind which hath wisdom. The seven heads are seven mountains, on which the woman sitteth.(THE VATICAN IS BUILT ON 7 HILLS OR MOUNTAINS)
10 And there are seven kings: five are fallen,(1-ASSYRIA,2-EGYPT,3-BABYLON,4-MEDO-PERSIA,5-GREECE) and one is,(IN POWER IN JOHNS AND JESUS DAY-6-ROME) and the other is not yet come; and when he cometh, he must continue a short space.(7TH-REVIVED ROMAN EMPIRE OR THE EUROPEAN UNION TODAY AND THE SHORT SPACE IS-7 YEARS.THE EUROPEAN UNION WILL HAVE WORLD CONTROL FOR THE LAST 3 1/2 YEARS.BUT WILL HAVE ITS MIGHTY WORLD POWER FOR THE FULL 7 YEARS OF THE 7 YEAR TRIBULATION PERIOD.AND THE WORLD DICTATOR WILL BE THE BEAST FROM THE EU.AND THE VATICAN POPE WILL BE THE WHORE THAT RIDES THE EUROPEAN UNION TO POWER.AND THE 2 EUROPEAN UNION POWER FREAKS WILL CONTROL AND DECIEVE THE WHOLE EARTH INTO THEIR DESTRUCTION.IF YOU ARE NOT SAVED BY THE BLOOD OF JESUS.YOU WILL BE DECIEVED BY THESE TWO.THE WORLD POLITICIAN-THE EUROPEAN UNION DICTATOR.AND THE FALSE PROPHET THAT DEFECTS CHRISTIANITY-THE FALSE VATICAN POPE.
11 And the beast that was, and is not, even he is the eighth, and is of the seven, and goeth into perdition.
12 And the ten horns which thou sawest are ten kings, which have received no kingdom as yet; but receive power as kings one hour with the beast.
13 These have one mind, and shall give their power and strength unto the beast.

Heres the scripture 1 week = 7 yrs Genesis 29:27-29
27 Fulfil her week, and we will give thee this also for the service which thou shalt serve with me yet seven other years.
28 And Jacob did so, and fulfilled her week:(7 YEARS) and he gave him Rachel his daughter to wife also.
29 And Laban gave to Rachel his daughter Bilhah his handmaid to be her maid.

DANIEL 9:26-27
26 And after threescore and two weeks(62X7=434 YEARS+7X7=49 YEARS=TOTAL OF 69 WEEKS OR 483 YRS) shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself: and the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary;(ROMAN LEADERS DESTROYED THE 2ND TEMPLE) and the end thereof shall be with a flood, and unto the end of the war desolations are determined.(THERE HAS TO BE 70 WEEKS OR 490 YRS TO FUFILL THE VISION AND PROPHECY OF DAN 9:24).(THE NEXT VERSE IS THAT 7 YR WEEK OR (70TH FINAL WEEK).
27 And he ( THE ROMAN,EU PRESIDENT) shall confirm the covenant (PEACE TREATY) with many for one week:(1X7=7 YEARS) and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease,(3 1/2 yrs in TEMPLE ANIMAL SACRIFICES STOPPED) and for the overspreading of abominations he shall make it desolate, even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate.

Opinion-G20 is 'test run' for Trump-era climate governance By Simon Schunz-euobserver

BRUSSELS, 27. Jun, 09:06-Weeks after US president Donald Trump announced the US' withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement, the debate is still raging on in regard to the possible implications of his decision.Some fear a global domino effect, with more countries renouncing climate protection pledges and ceasing domestic emission reduction efforts.Others argue that the Paris accord's architecture is sufficiently resilient, and that efforts to keep global temperature increases to "well below 2°C" – as stipulated by the agreement – will endure.Activities at the sub-national level in the US also seem to support the argument that the agreement will prevail and domestic opponents of Trump’s decision have mobilised remarkably quickly.Cities and states with progressive climate policies joined forces across the US, committing themselves to honouring the Paris agreement.For instance, support came via the bipartisan "US Climate Alliance" of states – including heavyweights such as California and New York – and the "We Are Still In" initiative, which involves hundreds of businesses, investors, and institutes of higher education.Moreover, these sub-national players are linking up with leading nations to create innovative climate diplomacy networks: California and China have held talks to collaborate on emission reduction efforts, while several US states have intensified climate cooperation with Canada.Though these developments enhance the Paris agreement’s chances of survival, they will not be enough.Fight for survival-The resilience of the agreement hinges on how other major emitters will react to Trump’s break.To pursue effective global climate governance, these countries must repeat the steps taken in the run-up to the 2015 Paris climate meeting, where a strategy of "multiple bilateralism" between US-China, China-India and China-EU (among others) served to build trust and resolve crunch issues.The emerging consensus among key emitters was translated into cooperation in the world’s club governance fora (G7, G20) and fed into the multilateral negotiations, leading to the Paris agreement’s ultimate entry into force.True to this spirit, six members (plus the EU) were already pressuring the US to remain committed to the Paris agreement at the recent G7 summit in Sicily. Not that it seemed to do much good, as Trump withdrew from the climate pact a few days later.The next litmus test for effective global climate governance comes in July, when leaders from countries accounting for 80% of global emissions meet for the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, on 7-8 July.With the US thrusting itself into isolation, the German G20 presidency will seek to gather the broadest possible support for the Paris agreement.But a question remains: is a G20 entente possible? It might be, if others show the way.Climate leaders-From the G7, the EU and Canada display the clearest leadership ambitions.EU heavyweights have signalled their "strongest commitment" to uphold their pledges to combat climate change.In his reaction to Trump’s Paris exit, Canada's prime minister, Justin Trudeau, confirmed his country's "unwavering commitment to fight climate change".The Canadian government has also vehemently denied recent reports that Trudeau wished to scrap references to climate from the draft G20 declaration, in order to appease the US government.But leaders need followers. And whether followers can be mobilised depends on how G20 members define their interests – economically and politically.Economically, many G20 countries appear to believe the energy transition – accelerated by the Paris Agreement – must continue.Investing in low-carbon development is no longer seen as a burden on growth prospects. If anything, there is a growing consensus that Trump’s decision will put the US at risk of lagging behind technologically.Politically, the relationship between G20 countries and the US (particularly the Trump administration) is tricky.Are countries like Australia, Japan, Turkey and the UK willing to risk relations with the president of a key ally by adopting a confrontational attitude over climate change? The answer depends heavily on whether the German G20 presidency can dispel their concerns by convincingly demonstrating that the world is changing – because it is.-Changing world-At an EU-China summit the day after Trump’s announcement, a draft joint declaration on climate change characterised the Paris Agreement as “an historic achievement further accelerating the irreversible global low greenhouse gas emission and climate resilient development” and outlined numerous joint actions.Although it was ultimately withheld due to trade-related differences, this declaration contains the blueprint for a shifting centre of gravity in global climate governance to Eurasia.If supported by India's prime minister, Narendra Modi, who has reiterated support for the Paris Agreement, a solid pro-climate coalition including three of the world’s top four emitters would emerge.Cooperation with Canada, and with the sub-national forces in the US, could then provide additional momentum to convince other G20 members.As a major guiding forum, the G20 represents a test run for the future of global climate governance during the Trump era.The direction this governance will take, depends heavily on the strength of emerging partnerships, and their ability to convince others to join them regardless of US policies.If the will is robust enough, this "multiple bilateralism" could bring about the dawn of a new era, and the successful implementation of the Paris Agreement.If it fails, however, global climate politics faces a complicated, daunting future.Dr Simon Schunz is a Research Fellow at the United Nations University Institute on Comparative Regional Integration Studies (UNU-CRIS), and a professor of EU International Relations and Diplomacy Studies at the College of Europe in Bruges. He is also a visiting professor at the University of Leuven.

Opinion-EU parliament should befriend transparency By Sylvie GUILLAUME and Danuta HUEBNER-euobserver

BRUSSELS, 27. Jun, 17:24-A few days ago, an NGO representative expressed her concerns about the way the European Parliament was dealing with the European Commission’s proposal for a revised inter-institutional agreement on a “mandatory transparency register”.The proposal was submitted by the EU commission on 28 September 2016 and aimed at including the Council of the EU, where representatives of member states sit, as a new partner within the framework.Following the commission's proposal, the EU parliament’s Conference of Presidents entrusted us, as the responsible lead negotiators - supported by a contact group composed of one MEP from each political group - with developing a draft negotiating mandate.We organised five contact group meetings, where detailed discussions provided the opportunity for all political groups to give their input and ideas. It led to the endorsement of a balanced text on 11 April this year.We enriched our deliberations by means of a half-day meeting between the contact group and the involved NGO representatives - including Nina Katzemich from the website LobbyControl, and others from organisations such as Transparency International, Civil Society Europe and Corporate Europe Observatory.We listened carefully to their concerns, many of which we had already incorporated into our work, such as the necessity to enlarge the definition of lobbying and to include an independent observer in the management structure of the transparency register.We also discussed how we to pursue the negotiations with the EU commission and the council in order to get those concerns taken on board.Instead of the expected swift adoption of the mandate, which would signal the parliament’s readiness to enter into negotiations, we were deeply troubled to find that the item had been taken off the agenda of the Conference of Presidents on successive occasions.-Horse-trading-It appeared that some MEPs used procedural manoeuvres and political horse-trading to achieve repeated postponements of the adoption of the mandate, even though a large majority in parliament supported its content.It seems that it is sometimes those who believe themselves to be on the path of righteousness, who are most willing to misuse our system of procedures to score cheap political points.We found it disturbing that some wilfully ignored parliament’s power to determine its own internal organisation.It has also saddened us to see that some of those who claim to be at the forefront of stemming the tide of populism, do not seem to mind riding on that very same tide when it serves their own political ends.However, we were glad to see that the Conference of Presidents finally adopted the mandate two weeks ago on 15 June, in the very same form that had been proposed by the contact group.Following its adoption, the mandate was immediately published on the EU parliament’s website.Regarding the free and independent mandate of MEPs - enshrined in EU primary law - it is noteworthy that the independence of elected representatives is a cornerstone of a representative democracy and a principle this is not easily dismissed.Therefore, any limitation on MEPs in the exercise of their free mandate must be proportionate and cannot, for example, unduly restrict his or her right to seek information.Moreover, a principle enshrined in primary law cannot be altered by secondary law, let alone by an inter-institutional agreement.The mandate adopted on 15 June is based on a long line of parliament’s decisions regarding its relations with interest representatives.It reflects the position of a broad majority of MEPs and it constitutes a solid base for negotiations on a significant improvement to the current transparency register and a widening of its scope.-Negotiating framework-The mandate should be understood as a framework for the negotiations.Parliament’s position will continue to be adapted as the negotiations progress. Once the negotiations are concluded, parliament will adopt follow-up decisions with respect to its internal organisation, in order to implement the new inter‑institutional agreement.But the European Parliament still remains committed to pushing for a transparency regulation that would go beyond an inter-institutional agreement and lay down the relevant provisions on transparency and the register in secondary law.One should not forget the progress that parliament has achieved so far in this field. It initiated the Transparency Register as early as 1996, as well as a Code of Conduct with a commitment for registered lobbyists to act in accordance with high ethical standards.Parliament is, and remains, the most open EU institution, which can be seen with the web-streaming of its meetings and the ability for citizens to visit all of its buildings.Furthermore, parliament decided that registration on the transparency register was to be made a requirement to be invited as a speaker at committee hearings and to receive a long-term access badge for its premises.It also put in place a voluntary legislative footprint last year, and it encourages its MEPs to meet only with registered organisations.Katzemich considers the EU commission to have made a big step in 2015 by publishing meetings of commissioners, heads of cabinets and directors‑general.Certainly, this is true. However, this measure was decided by the commission with a view to its own internal organisation and cannot be easily translated to other institutions such as EU parliament or the council, both of which have a different set-up.Furthermore, the commission’s system is not without its flaws and has room for improvement, as Transparency International and other organisations regularly report.As the EU parliament's lead negotiators, we are particularly committed to getting the council on board and to adding significant value compared to the current framework.Three principles-A new register should encompass the following three principles.First, the widest possible scope of application for EU institutions and other bodies, including meaningful participation of the council.Next, a comprehensive and clear framework, without weakening the current system, for the regulation of interest representation activities.Finally, structures and resources that guarantee effective implementation.One of the main issues is that the new inter-institutional agreement provides a framework for coordination among the EU institutions, while at the same time fully respecting their different competences and prerogatives.-The mandate-The approach we have developed in our mandate would allow for:- The full respect of MEPs' independent mandate.- An inclusive transparency policy for all types of interest representative, as with the current register that features over 11200 registered interest groups from all over the world.- The possibility to maintain the wider definition of lobbying, covering both direct and indirect interest representation (as with the current system).- The full respect for each institutions’ needs, e.g. in the case of parliament as an open house but also with the need to know, for security reasons, who is coming in and why.- More flexibility in respect to the EU institutions’ roles and structures (parliament cannot simply duplicate rules that were designed for the commission).- Better quality information on the database – making the register more reliable as a source of information for the institutions themselves and for the general public.The quality of the new system will depend on how far the council can be convinced to match the parliament’s and commission’s commitment to transparency.We would therefore advise to look at the whole picture and analyse the situation comprehensively, especially with a view to scrutinising the council’s approach.It takes time to change long-standing practices, but we are fully committed to forge ahead, knowing that a pragmatic and constructive approach will yield the best results.Transparency certainly is one important aspect of ensuring citizens’ trust in the EU institutions. But it is not the only one. Keeping true to the facts is another.Sylvie Guillaume is a vice-president of the European Parliament, and Danuta Huebner is the chair of the constitutional affairs committee-Correction: The article's footnote originally said that Danuta Huebner is the chair of the foreign affairs committee, when in fact, she is the chair of the constitutional affairs committee

EU Commission could get say on Russia gas pipeline By Andrew Rettman-euobserver

BRUSSELS, 27. Jun, 09:29-EU states have given initial backing for the European Commission to negotiate the legal model of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline with Russia.Pablo Micallef, a spokesman for the Maltese EU presidency, told EUobserver that “some 13” member states spoke out on the plan when EU energy ministers met for informal talks in Brussels on Monday.The incoming Estonian EU presidency is now expected to convene a working group to take things forward.The Danish energy minister, Lars Christian Lilleholt, who was among the 13 EU backers, said: “I’m very satisfied. It was the best thing that could have come out of the meeting”.The mandate will have to be formally approved later down the line in a “reinforced qualified majority” vote by member states, a higher than usual threshold of 72 percent of EU countries representing 65 percent of its population.Maros Sefcovic, the EU energy commissioner who drafted the proposal, told the Reuters news agency: “I’m definitely optimistic about getting the [formal] mandate, but I know this is just the beginning of the debate."Nord Stream 2 is to concentrate 70 percent of Russian gas supplies to Europe in one route to Germany under the Baltic Sea.But its critics, which include the Nordic states, the Baltic countries, Poland, and the US, say it would harm EU energy security and undermine Ukraine, a Western ally, by making Ukraine’s transit pipes obsolete.-EU laws-Anna-Kaisa Itkonen, the Commission’s energy spokeswoman, told EUobserver on Tuesday that the Commission wanted to talk to Russia on whether the offshore part of Nord Stream 2 should be covered by the EU’s so-called third energy package.That EU law would oblige Russian state firm Gazprom to open up its Nord Stream 2 monopoly to EU competitors - a demand which led Russia to stop a previous project, the South Stream pipeline under the Black Sea to Bulgaria.But Itkonen said the talks would “not [be] about a [Commission] veto, it is not about the future of the pipeline, not about the Commission approving it or not”.She said the Commission-Russia talks would be designed to give “legal certainty” on Nord Stream 2 and that they would be “nothing spectacular or extraordinary” because EU officials had held similar discussions with “third countries” on other projects.The Nord Stream 2 regulatory framework is currently being negotiated between Germany and Russia.German, Austrian, French, and Anglo-Dutch firms - Uniper, Wintershall, OMV, Engie, and Shell - are to take part in the project, with Germany and Austria keen to press ahead.Neither the German nor the Austrian minister spoke out on Monday, EU sources told Reuters, but Germany and Austria recently attacked the US over its threat to impose sanctions on Nord Stream 2 investors.“We decide who supplies us with energy and how they do it”, the German and Austrian foreign ministers said in a joint statement on 15 June.-Ukraine unhappy-Pavlo Klimkin, the Ukrainian foreign minister, told Reuters in Paris on Monday that Nord Stream 2 "would have disastrous consequences for the energy security of the European Union and would make the EU dependent on one source.""Maybe some companies will benefit for the time being, but in the long-run it will lead nowhere”, he said.He added that there was no progress on Russia ending hostilities in east Ukraine."How can you trust Russia in setting up a unique source of gas supply?”, he said, referring to broader EU and US concerns over Russia’s aggressive behaviour toward neighbouring states.

Focus-Nordics consider alternative to EU emissions trading system By Lisbeth Kirk-june 28,17-euobserver

Copenhagen, Today, 07:44-If the European emissions trading system is not reformed to work efficiently, a Nordic carbon price floor could be introduced to secure future green investments in the region, according to a new strategic review of energy co-operation by the Nordic Council.The plan, which has been in preparation for over a year, is penned by Finnish businessman Jorma Ollila, who had formerly chaired Royal Dutch Shell for almost ten years and was the chairman and CEO of Nokia.It comes at a crucial time, just as the final talks on reforming the EU's carbon trading scheme are due to take place in Brussels.On Tuesday (27 June), representatives of the EU member states, the European Parliament and the European Commission met for one of the final meetings on how the EU’s flagship climate instrument – the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) – should look in the 2021-2030 period.But before the real talks have even started, hopes of reforming the EU system to work efficiently are fading.”I think everyone realises that this is not enough. The [EU] proposal will not deliver a carbon price that we need to decarbonise the industry sectors,” said Femke de Jong, EU policy director for Carbon Market Watch.Her organisation brings together more than 800 NGOs and academics from 70 different countries, working to make the carbon market “an effective climate mitigation tool.””I think it is only logical to have a debate on how we can complement the system. A carbon floor price – at least at the regional level – seems a realistic option,” de Jong said.-Nordic energy union-Norway and Sweden are strong on hydropower, Norway produces oil and gas, Denmark has wind, while Finland and Sweden have built nuclear plants and are pushing for more bio-fuels as a future energy resource.Some 20 years ago, these countries decided to connect their national electricity grids with water reservoirs, allowing hydropower to serve as a kind of Nordic battery to compensate for periods without wind, for example.”There were significant benefits, welfare benefits, lower electricity prices and easier management of the generation of electricity in tough times or during high peak demand in winter times,” Ollila pointed out.This Nordic solution, Ollila said, has been "managed historically very well". He added that since the EU is looking into different prospects for the energy union, there is an opportunity to learn from "what has been done in Nordic countries over the past 20 years."In addition to Nordic carbon trade, Ollila also suggested a Nordic export strategy for green energy solutions, alignment of research and using the whole Nordic area as a testbed.Nuuk in Greenland has been suggested to become a testbed for the full deployment of electric vehicles, and Reykjavik in Iceland may become a testing ground for infrastructure and systems that can support electrification of visiting cruise and fishing ships.The Faroe Islands may become the place for the development of battery technology and energy storage.-Green transition and growth-Put together, the Nordic region today is one of the 12 largest economies in the world and it is already living proof that the green transition is not incompatible with economic growth.However, the Nordics must become even greener to complete their transition into renewable energy, the Nordic Council report said."The energy transition is already underway – but if the Nordic countries do not participate to the fullest, the jobs will be created elsewhere," warned Jorma Ollila."The renewables will take off faster than what was thought only five years ago. So, the role of the renewables will grow quite significantly," he added."The focus should be on securing the most efficient green transition. If the ETS does not provide this, it may be relevant and timely to discuss a joint Nordic approach to support the schemes for renewable energy," Ollila's report concluded.”Another approach could be to discuss the introduction of a Nordic carbon price, based on the United Kingdom’s carbon price floor, in order to secure stronger incentives for the green transition,” it said.-UK leads the way-The prospect of a regionalised European carbon trading system in the future is not limited to the Nordic area. For instance, the UK already introduced a carbon price floor in 2013.”So far, the only country in Europe that has a carbon floor price is the UK. There it was very effective. They introduced a carbon floor price in 2013 and it has resulted in UK coal emissions falling by almost 60% last year," Femke de Jong said, adding: "So it is really significant."She goes on to say that: "It can be a very effective instrument to – at least in the intermediate time – to make sure that the carbon price reflects the damage cost of the pollution to the society.”Under the UK carbon floor price system, carbon emission prices rise automatically – currently at 18 pounds sterling (€20) from 2016 to 2020.Currently the carbon price in Europe stands at €5, but it should rise to €40 to meet the objectives of the Paris climate agreement and rise further to €100 in 2030.-Regional carbon trade-”Ideally, this should be solved at the EU level, but if this is not possible in the short-term, it makes sense to go for a regional solution,” de Jong said.”France has been pushing for it very much in the past and we think that now, with Macron [as president of France], he will also push for that," she added."Let's see," she said, "maybe after the German elections, there can also be a regional carbon price in Western Europe – with Germany, maybe Belgium, the Netherlands and France."Linking the Nordic carbon trade to the British system might be made complicated by the Brexit process, however.”I think it might be tricky for the Nordic countries to join the UK system,” said de Jong.”It is still an open question if the UK will withdraw from the ETS or not. Maybe it is also an idea to team up more with other countries that are contemplating this,” she suggested.

Luxembourg not a tax haven, claims PM By Nikolaj Nielsen-june 28,17-euobserver

Luxembourg, Today, 08:42-Luxembourg continues to refute any notion that it is a tax haven, despite widespread evidence of dubious schemes that it cuts global tax bills for big firms."We were never a tax haven," Luxembourg's prime minister, Xavier Bettel, told EUobserver on Tuesday (27 June).Bettel's comments follow a grilling of Luxembourg's former prime minister and current European Commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker. Juncker in late May told the European Parliament that he was unable to explain why the Grand Duchy "didn't want to remove tax secrecy."But Bettel, who was fielding a wide range of questions from reporters at an event hosted by the European Investment Bank in Luxembourg, defended the country's tax policies by saying it was one of the first places to push transparency and the exchange of tax rulings with other member states."It is important for me that we have common rules and Luxembourg was one of the first one for transparency," he said.Luxembourg was rocked by scandal following media revelations in late 2014 that exposed how nearly 340 companies secured secret deals that shaved billions of euros from taxes, which were due to be paid elsewhere.The revelations ushered in a raft of new EU and national legislation to increase tax transparency and weed out abuse.The scandal also triggered a probe by the European Parliament, which slammed Luxembourg for allowing corporations to dodge "tax that could have been used to build schools, hospitals or pay down national debt."A report by the Brussels-based NGO, Eurodad, had also revealed last December that Luxembourg had in fact increased the number of so-called tax rulings in the wake of the 2014 media revelations by some 50 percent.The issue saw former PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) employee Antoine Deltour face prison time for leaking the secret rules to the media, posing larger questions on whistleblower protection laws.But Bettel maintained that his country was fully compliant with tax standards and had not committed a crime."There are over 20 countries in Europe doing [tax] rulings," he noted, echoing a similar refrain to his predecessor, Juncker.Luxembourg, under Juncker's decade-long leadership of the country, had also repeatedly blocked the rolling back of aggressive tax planning schemes throughout the EU, according to a cache of German cables leaked earlier this year.Bettel also opposes any pan-EU taxation system and refuses to impose any sort of tax on financial transactions.The financial transaction tax, also known as the FTT, aims to raise money for the public good by imposing a 0.1 percent tax on shares and bonds, and 0.01 percent on derivative products."I am fully against and I will block that," said Bettel. But he noted that other member states are free to move ahead on the file as part of a two-speed Europe.He also added that people in Luxembourg should not have to pay more tax only "because other countries were not responsible with public finances."

New cyberattack wallops Europe; spreads more slowly in US-[The Canadian Press]-YAHOONEWS-June 27, 2017

PARIS — A new and highly virulent outbreak of data-scrambling software — apparently sown in Ukraine — caused disruption across the world Tuesday. Following a similar attack in May , the fresh cyber-assault paralyzed some hospitals, government offices and major multinational corporations in a dramatic demonstration of how easily malicious programs can bring daily life to a halt.Ukraine and Russia appeared hardest hit by the new strain of ransomware — malicious software that locks up computer files with all-but-unbreakable encryption and then demands a ransom for its release. In the United States, the malware affected companies such as the drugmaker Merck and Mondelez International, the owner of food brands such as Oreo and Nabisco.Its pace appeared to slow as the day wore on, in part because the malware appeared to require direct contact between computer networks, a factor that may have limited its spread in regions with fewer connections to Ukraine.The malware's origins remain unclear. Researchers picking the program apart found evidence its creators had borrowed from leaked National Security Agency code, raising the possibility that the digital havoc had spread using U.S. taxpayer-funded tools."The virus is spreading all over Europe and I'm afraid it can harm the whole world," said Victor Zhora, the chief executive of Infosafe IT in Kyiv , where reports of the malicious software first emerged early afternoon local time Tuesday.In Ukraine, victims included top-level government offices, where officials posted photos of darkened computer screens, as well as energy companies, banks, cash machines, gas stations, and supermarkets. Ukrainian Railways and the communications company Ukrtelecom were among major enterprises hit, Infrastructure Minister Volodymyr Omelyan said in a Facebook post .The virus hit the radiation-monitoring at Ukraine's shuttered Chornobyl power plant, site of the world's worst nuclear accident, forcing it into manual operation.Multinational companies, including the global law firm DLA Piper and Danish shipping giant A.P. Moller-Maersk were also affected, although the firms didn't specify the extent of the damage.Ukraine bore the brunt with more than 60 per cent of the attacks, followed by Russia with more than 30 per cent , according to initial findings by researchers at the cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab. It listed Poland, Italy and Germany, in that order, as the next-worst affected.In the U.S, two hospitals in western Pennsylvania were hit; patients reported on social media that some surgeries had to be rescheduled. A spokeswoman for Heritage Valley Health System would say only that operational changes had to be made. A Wellsville, Ohio, woman at one of its hospitals to have her gallbladder removed said she noticed computer monitors off and nurses scurrying around with stacks of paperwork.Security experts said Tuesday's global cyberattack shares something in common with last month's outbreak of ransomware, dubbed WannaCry . Both spread using digital lock picks originally created by the NSA and later published to the web by a still-mysterious group known as the Shadowbrokers.Security vendors including Bitdefender and Kaspersky said the NSA exploit, known as EternalBlue, lets malware spread rapidly across internal networks at companies and other large organizations. Microsoft issued a security fix in March, but Chris Wysopal, chief technology officer at the security firm Veracode, said it would only be effective if every single computer on a network were patched — otherwise, a single infected machine could infect all others."Once activated, the virus can automatically and freely distribute itself on your network," Ukraine's cyberpolice tweeted.Bogdan Botezatu, an analyst with Bitdefender, compared such self-spreading software to a contagious disease. "It's like somebody sneezing into a train full of people," he said.Ryan Kalember, a security expert at Proofpoint, said one reason the attacks appeared to be slowing down was that the ransomware appears to spread only when a direct contact exists between two networks — such as when a global company's Ukraine office interacts with headquarters.But once it hits a computer on a network, it spreads quickly, even among computers that have applied the fix for the NSA exploit."It's more harmful to the organization that it affects, but because it's not randomly spreading over the internet like WannaCry, it's somewhat contained to the organizations that were connected to each other," Kalember said.Botezatu said the new program appeared nearly identical to GoldenEye, a variant of a known family of hostage-taking programs known as "Petya." It demanded $300 in Bitcoin.Unlike typical ransomware, which merely scrambles personal data files, the program wreaking havoc Tuesday overwrites a computer's master boot record, making it tougher to restore even a machine that has been backed up, said Kalember.It may have first spread through a rogue update to a piece of Ukrainian accounting software called MEDoc, according to tweets by the country's cyberpolice unit. It said a rogue update seeded the infection across Ukraine. In a lengthy statement posted to Facebook, MEDoc acknowledged having been hacked.The motives of those behind the malware remain unknown. Ukraine has been a persistent target of pro-Russian hackers, who are blamed for twice shutting down large swaths of its power grid in the dead of winter and sabotaging its elections system in a bid to disrupt May 2014 national elections.Emails sent Tuesday to an address posted to the bottom of ransom demands went unreturned. That might be because the email provider hosting that address, Berlin-based Posteo, pulled the plug on the account before the infection became widely known.In an email, a Posteo representative said it had blocked the email address "immediately" after learning that it was associated with ransomware. The company added that it was in contact with German authorities "to make sure that we react properly."___Bajak reported from Houston. Associated Press writers Anick Jesdanun in New York, Vladimir Isachenkov in Moscow, Larry Rosenthal in Beaver, Pennsylvania and Jan M. Olsen in Copenhagen, Denmark, contributed to this report.Raphael Satter And Frank Bajak, The Associated Press.

Trudeau appoints his first climate change ambassador with revamped mandate-[The Canadian Press]-YAHOONEWS-June 27, 2017

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has tapped a long-time Canadian diplomat to step into a revamped role of Canada's ambassador for climate change.Canada hasn't had such an ambassador since January 2015.Jennifer MacIntyre fills the role as of Tuesday, with a mandate to push Canada's international relationships on the climate change file, including promoting Canadian clean technology businesses abroad.She is the fifth person to hold the title of ambassador for climate change — but the first where the role is not the equivalent of Canada's chief negotiator for climate change treaties.As such she will not be on hand next week when Trudeau sits down with other G20 leaders in Germany where the Paris climate change agreement will be front and centre.Instead her role is to find ways for Canada to take advantage of any international opportunities for trade and investment that climate change policies bring.MacIntyre spent most of the last four years as the ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein.The Canadian Press.

NATO chief: US allies to spend $12 billion more this year-[The Canadian Press]-YAHOONEWS-June 28, 2017

BRUSSELS — NATO's chief says U.S. allies are projected to spend around $12 billion more on defence this year, after President Donald Trump berated them for failing to boost military budgets.NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said Wednesday that "we have really shifted gears. The (spending) trend is up and we intend to keep it up."Unveiling new figures, Stoltenberg said European allies and Canada have increased spending by almost $46 billion over the last three years.He said 25 of NATO's 29 allies aim to raise defence spending in 2017.Only the United States, Britain, Estonia, debt-burden Greece and Poland met NATO's spending targets last year. Romania says it will meet the 2 per cent of GDP guideline this year, while Latvia and Lithuania plan to in 2018.The Associated Press.

STORMS HURRICANES-TORNADOES

LUKE 21:25-26
25 And there shall be signs in the sun,(HEATING UP-SOLAR ECLIPSES) and in the moon,(MAN ON MOON-LUNAR ECLIPSES) and in the stars;(ASTEROIDS ETC) and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity;(MASS CONFUSION) the sea and the waves roaring;(FIERCE WINDS)
26 Men’s hearts failing them for fear,(TORNADOES,HURRICANES,STORMS) and for looking after those things which are coming on the earth:(DESTRUCTION) for the powers of heaven shall be shaken.(FROM QUAKES,NUKES ETC)

Wind fans the flames of Utah fire that has burned 13 homes-[The Canadian Press]-YAHOONEWS-June 28, 2017

SALT LAKE CITY — Firefighters are bracing for more high winds Wednesday as they try to slow a southern Utah wildfire that has burned 13 homes and forced the evacuation of 1,500 people.Firefighters are hoping to be able to put out hot spots on the southern end of the fire to allow residents to return to the ski town of Brian Head. Homes there have been evacuated since June 17 when authorities say it was started by someone using a torch tool to burn weeds on private land.The fire is the largest in the nation at 78 square miles (201 square kilometres ).The blaze is one of several in the West. Crews in California were making gains against two new fires that spread quickly, and firefighters in Idaho battled five lightning-sparked wildfires burning in grass and brush.

The Associated Press
WORLD POWERS IN THE LAST DAYS (END OF AGE OF GRACE NOT THE WORLD)

EUROPEAN UNION-KING OF WEST-DAN 9:26-27,DAN 7:23-24,DAN 11:40,REV 13:1-10
EGYPT-KING OF THE SOUTH-DAN 11:40
RUSSIA-KING OF THE NORTH-EZEK 38:1-2,EZEK 39:1-3
CHINA-KING OF THE EAST-DAN 11:44,REV 9:16,18
VATICAN-RELIGIOUS LEADER-REV 13:11-18,REV 17:4-5,9,18

WORLD TERRORISM

OH BY THE WAY WHEN THE MEDIA SAYS ALLU-AK-BAR MEANS GOD IS GREAT LIE. IN ISLAM ALLU-AK-BAR MEANS OUR GOD IS GREATER OR GREATEST. THIS IS HOW THE MEDIA SUCK HOLES UP TO ISLAMIC-QURANIC-MUSLIMS. BY WATERING DOWN THE REAL MEANING OF THE SEX FOR MURDER DEATH CULT ISLAM. TO MAKE IT SOUND LIKE A PEACEFUL RELIGION (CULT OF DEATH AND WORLD DOMINATION).

GENESIS 6:11-13
11 The earth also was corrupt before God, and the earth was filled with violence.(WORLD TERRORISM,MURDERS)(HAMAS IN HEBREW IS VIOLENCE)
12 And God looked upon the earth, and, behold, it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted his way upon the earth.
13 And God said unto Noah, The end of all flesh is come before me; for the earth is filled with violence (TERRORISM)(HAMAS) through them; and, behold, I will destroy them with the earth.

GENESIS 16:11-12
11 And the angel of the LORD said unto her,(HAGAR) Behold, thou art with child, and shalt bear a son, and shalt call his name Ishmael;(FATHER OF THE ARAB/MUSLIMS) because the LORD hath heard thy affliction.
12 And he (ISHMAEL-FATHER OF THE ARAB-MUSLIMS) will be a wild (DONKEY-JACKASS) man;(ISLAM IS A FAKE AND DANGEROUS SEX FOR MURDER CULT) his hand will be against every man,(ISLAM HATES EVERYONE) and every man's hand against him;(PROTECTING THEMSELVES FROM BEING BEHEADED) and he (ISHMAEL ARAB/MUSLIM) shall dwell in the presence of all his brethren.(LITERAL-THE ARABS LIVE WITH THEIR BRETHERN JEWS)

ISAIAH 14:12-14
12  How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer,(SATAN) son of the morning!(HEBREW-CRECENT MOON-ISLAM) how art thou cut down to the ground, which didst weaken the nations!
13  For thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God: I will sit also upon the mount of the congregation, in the sides of the north:
14  I (SATAN HAS EYE TROUBLES) will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will be like the most High.(AND 1/3RD OF THE ANGELS OF HEAVEN FELL WITH SATAN AND BECAME DEMONS)

JOHN 16:2
2 They shall put you out of the synagogues: yea, the time cometh, that whosoever killeth you will think that he doeth God service.(ISLAM MURDERS IN THE NAME OF MOON GOD ALLAH OF ISLAM)

Trudeau touts open Canadian immigration system in face of Trump travel ban-[CBC]-YAHOONEWS-June 27, 2017

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he will continue to promote Canada's open immigration policy on the world stage as controversy rages over U.S. President Donald Trump's travel ban.Trudeau said Tuesday during a news conference in Ottawa to wrap up the parliamentary sitting that government officials have had "multiple conversations" with the U.S. administration about protecting Canadian rights in the face of immigration decisions south of the border."But at the same time, Canadians have been very clear that we see immigration as a net positive, that we know we don't have to compromise security to build stronger, more resilient communities," he said. "I will continue to stand for Canadian values and Canadian success in our immigration system as I always have, whether it's in Washington or in Hamburg next week or elsewhere around the world."On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed a limited version of Trump's ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries to take effect.The justices will hear full arguments in October, but in the meantime, the court said Trump's ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen could be enforced if those visitors lack a "credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States."-Trudeau defends sniper role-In the wide-ranging news conference in the National Press Theatre, Trudeau was asked about topics ranging from trade concerns with the U.S. to recent news that a Canadian special forces member had shot and killed an ISIS fighter at a record distance for a sniper.Trudeau called the sniper actions "entirely consistent" with the role of troops in northern Iraq. The "advise and assist" mission has always had an element of defending Canadian forces as well as our coalition partners, he said."That is something that is integral to this mission, and that is something that has always been followed," he said.NDP Leader Tom Mulcair has said the incident suggests Canadian forces are actually involved in direct combat in Iraq, and has called on Trudeau to provide the public with more details on the role of the mission.Trudeau said the incident should be "celebrated" for demonstrating the excellence in training and performance of duties by the Canadian Forces.National Defence said the sniper, part of the Joint Task Force 2 special forces unit, was supporting Iraqi forces when he shot an enemy fighter from 3,540 metres away.That is more than a kilometre farther than the previous record, held by a British sniper who shot a Taliban fighter in Afghanistan in 2009.Trudeau also said he broke his key electoral promise to reform Canada's electoral system because there was no compromise from other parties, and he didn't want to use his Liberal majority to ram through fundamental change."There was no path to do that."-'No path' on electoral reform-Trudeau said Liberals preferred a ranked ballot system, while the NDP wanted a proportional voting system that would have led to "fragmented" parties.Conservatives wanted to keep the status quo, he said."It was a very difficult decision for me," Trudeau said in describing his decision to break the promise.Asked about when the government will eliminate the deficit, Trudeau said his government is targeting billions in new spending on infrastructure and other services Canadians need and will not put a timeframe on when it will "arbitrarily" balance the books.Trudeau also touted what he sees as the government's key accomplishments so far, namely helping improve the quality of life for the middle class and taking steps to tackle the opioid crisis before taking questions.The prime minister also reacted to a new round of anti-dumping tariffs imposed on Canada's softwood lumber industry by the U.S. Department of Commerce. He said he is focused on being "constructive" and working toward a deal that will help protect thousands of jobs in Canada.Earlier Tuesday, the prime minister issued a statement to mark Multiculturalism Day.'Differences make us strong'"Canadians come from every corner of the world, speak two official languages and hundreds more, practise many faiths, and represent many cultures," he said. "Multiculturalism is at the heart of Canada's heritage and identity, and as Canadians, we recognize that our differences make us strong."Canada's tradition of multiculturalism has meant fresh perspectives and new answers to old problems, Trudeau said.Noting that Canada is celebrating both the 150th anniversary of Confederation and the 35th anniversary of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Trudeau said the milestones are a reminder of the values that unite Canadians: Openness, inclusion and deep respect for our differences."Whoever we are, wherever we come from, these values bring us together as equal members of this great country," he said.

U.S.-led coalition envoy visits Syria to discuss Raqqa aftermath-YAHOONEWS-[Reuters]-June 28, 2017

BEIRUT (Reuters) - Brett McGurk, the U.S. special envoy to the coalition against Islamic State visited north Syria on Wednesday and met the council planning to run Raqqa after its capture from the jihadists to assure it of support, one of its members said.The U.S.-led coalition is supporting the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), an alliance of Kurdish and Arab militias that began fighting inside Raqqa three weeks ago.The SDF announced the creation of the Raqqa Civil Council in April to replace militant rule in a city that has for three years been Islamic State's de facto capital in Syria.McGurk has met the council in Ain Issa in north Syria twice before in meetings that were not publicized, a member of the Raqqa Civil Council, Omar Alloush, said.Colonel Ryan Dillon, spokesman for the coalition, said coalition members are routinely in northern Syria working with the SDF and other local entities including the council. He could not confirm McGurk's visit on Wednesday and referred queries to the special envoy's office.Alloush said McGurk and other coalition officials, including its deputy commander Major General Rupert Jones, promised infrastructure help but did not discuss how much money was available."They did not specify any sum, but they decided we will support first removing mines, lifting rubble, maintenance of schools, then electricity stations and water," Alloush said.This month, volunteers at the council told Reuters they had informed the coalition it would take about $10 million a year to restore power and water supplies, roads and schools.(Reporting by Tom Perry; Writing by Angus McDowall; Editing by Louise Ireland)

Cluster bombs kill at least 15 in eastern Syria-[The Canadian Press]-YAHOONEWS-June 28, 2017

BEIRUT — A cluster bomb attack on an Islamic State-held village in eastern Syria killed at least 15 people on Wednesday, activists said, the latest in a series of devastating airstrikes along the Euphrates River ValleyTwo Syrian monitoring groups, Deir Ezzor 24 and Justice For Life, said the weapons were dropped on the village of Doblan by an unidentified jet. Russian, Syrian, and U.S.-led coalition aircraft are all known to operate in the area.Cluster bombs are designed to spread small bomblets across a wide area, but many fail to explode, endangering civilians long after the fighting has ended.Omar Abou Layla, the head of Deir Ezzor 24, said 15 bodies, including of women and children, were recovered in the village. He said residents expect to find many more killed.Ali Rahbe, of Justice For Life, said local informants counted at least 35 dead in the village, which is between the IS strongholds of al-Mayadeen and Boukamal.The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights put the initial toll at 30 dead.At least 57 people were killed in an airstrike on an IS-run jail in the Euphrates River Valley on Monday. Activists said that airstrike was carried out by the U.S.-led coalition. The coalition said it was looking into the reports.Turkey's military meanwhile said it returned fire after an attack by Syrian Kurdish forces.A statement Wednesday said the People's Protection Units, or YPG, fired on Turkish territory overnight with anti-aircraft weapons from Syria's Afrin region. Turkish artillery units returned fire, destroying the "detected targets."The YPG is the main component of the Syrian Democratic Forces, a U.S.-backed militia that is battling the Islamic State group in the extremists' de facto capital, Raqqa. Turkey views the YPG as an extension of the Kurdish insurgency raging in its southeast.Turkey was angered by a U.S. decision last month to arm the Syrian Kurds, fearing the weapons will end up in the hands of Kurdish rebels in Turkey.The Associated Press.

Philippines says beheaded civilians found in rebel-held town-[Reuters]-By Kanupriya Kapoor-YAHOONEWS-June 28, 2017

MARAWI CITY, Philippines (Reuters) - Five decapitated civilians were found in a Philippine city occupied by Islamist rebels on Wednesday, the military said, warning the number of residents killed by rebel "atrocities" could rise sharply as troops retake more ground.The discovery of the five victims among 17 bodies retrieved would be the first evidence that civilians trapped in besieged Marawi City have been decapitated during the five-week stand by militants loyal to the Islamic State group, as some who escaped the city have previously reported.Some 71 security forces and 299 militants have been killed and 246,000 people displaced in the conflict, which erupted after a failed attempt on May 23 to arrest a Filipino militant commander backed by Islamic State's leadership.President Rodrigo Duterte promised to destroy the militants in Marawi and said the Philippines was now dealing with "a very dangerous situation" due to young Muslims inspired by the "mass insanity" of Islamic State."All they do is just to kill and destroy, and killing in a most brutal way," he said at an event where he received hundreds of sniper and assault rifles donated by China to help the military campaign in Marawi."They enjoy decapitating people in front of cameras. They have to be dealt with, with the same ferocity but not the brutality," he said.The information about the beheadings came via a text message to reporters from Lieutenant Colonel Emmanuel Garcia of the Western Mindanao Command. Garcia did not respond to repeated requests for details.A civilian rescue worker, Abdul Azis Lomondot, told Reuters body parts were found, but with "no proof of beheading".Military spokesman Jo-Ar Herrera said bodies were found separately in two groups, of 12 and five, but he was unable to confirm if the five were beheaded.The battle entered its 36th day on Wednesday, with intense gunfights and bombing in the heart of the town and black-clad fighters seen from afar running between buildings as explosions rang out.The rebels' hold on Marawi, while incurring the full force of a military for years trained by its U.S. counterparts, has much of the region on edge, concerned that Islamic State's influence may run deeper than thought.Those fears are also being felt in Malaysia and Indonesia, whose nationals are among the Maute group of rebels fighting in Marawi, suggesting the group may have built a cross-border network that has gone largely undetected.-RISING TOLL-Military spokesman Restituto Padilla earlier said it was likely that many civilians had been killed and the death toll - at 27 before the latest 17 were announced - was only what the authorities could confirm independently and escapees had reported many in the area of fighting."(It) may increase significantly," Padilla told reporters. "There have been a significant number that have been seen."Padilla said the cause of all of those deaths would be "atrocities committed by the terrorists".Among those atrocities, the army says, have been residents being forced to loot homes, take up arms or become sex slaves.Videos have appeared this month on the website of Islamic State's Amaq news agency and its social media channels of hostages in Marawi pleading for their lives, saying they would be beheaded if air strikes were not stopped. Clips have also appeared of kneeling captives, shot in the head from behind.Reuters was unable to confirm the authenticity of the footage.The military has so far been reluctant to discuss the possibility that the real impact of the fighting on civilians could be far more severe than has been reported.It has played down the impact of daily air strikes and mortar assaults aimed at rebel sniper positions, which have reduced areas of the lakeside town to rubble and alarmed people stuck there, some of whom have said the shelling was a bigger threat than the militants.Military spokesman Padilla said troops needed more time to finish what was a tricky mission, complicated by trapped civilians, hostages and booby traps.(For a graphic on battle for Marawi, click http://tmsnrt.rs/2sqmHDf)(Additional reporting by Neil Jerome Morales in MANILA; Writing by Martin Petty)

CHINA AND KINGS OF THE EAST MARCH TO ISRAEL 2ND WAVE OF WW3 (200 MILLION MAN ARMY)

REVELATION 16:12-16
12 And the sixth angel poured out his vial upon the great river Euphrates;(WERE WW3 STARTS IN IRAQ OR SYRIA OR TURKEY) and the water thereof was dried up, that the way of the kings of the east might be prepared.(THE TURKEY ATATURK DAM ON THE EUPHRATES CAN BE SHUT AND DRIED UP ALREADY BY TURKEY)
13 And I saw three unclean spirits like frogs come out of the mouth of the dragon,(SATAN) and out of the mouth of the beast,(WORLD DICTATOR) and out of the mouth of the false prophet.(FALSE POPE)
14 For they are the spirits of devils, working miracles, which go forth unto the kings of the earth and of the whole world, to gather them to the battle of that great day of God Almighty.(WERE 2 BILLION DIE FROM NUKE WAR)
15 Behold, I come as a thief. Blessed is he that watcheth, and keepeth his garments, lest he walk naked, and they see his shame.
16 And he gathered them together into a place called in the Hebrew tongue Armageddon.(ITS AT THIS TIME I BELIEVE WHEN AMERICA GETS NUKED BY RUSSIA ON THE WAY TO THE MIDEAST)

DANIEL 11:44 (2ND WAVE OF WW3)
44 But tidings out of the east(CHINA) and out of the north(RUSSIA, MUSLIMS WHATS LEFT FROM WAVE 1) shall trouble him:(EU DICTATOR IN ISRAEL) therefore he shall go forth with great fury to destroy, and utterly to make away many.( 1/3RD OF EARTHS POPULATION)

REVELATION 9:12-18
12 One woe is past; and, behold, there come two woes more hereafter.
13 And the sixth angel sounded, and I heard a voice from the four horns of the golden altar which is before God,
14 Saying to the sixth angel which had the trumpet, Loose the four(DEMONIC WAR) angels which are bound in the great river Euphrates.(WORLDWIDE WAR)(TURKEY-IRAQ-SYRIA)(EUPHRATES RIVER CONSISTS OF 760 MILES IN TURKEY,440 MILES IN SYRIA AND 660 MILES IN IRAQ)
15 And the four(DEMONIC WAR) angels were loosed,(WORLDWIDE WAR) which were prepared for an hour, and a day, and a month, and a year, for to slay the third part of men.(1/3 Earths Population die in WW 3 2ND WAVE-2 billion)
16 And the number of the army of the horsemen were two hundred thousand thousand:(200 MILLION MAN ARMY FROM CHINA AND THE KINGS OF THE EAST) and I heard the number of them.
17 And thus I saw the horses in the vision, and them that sat on them, having breastplates of fire, and of jacinth, and brimstone: and the heads of the horses were as the heads of lions; and out of their mouths issued fire and smoke and brimstone.(NUCLEAR BOMBS)
18 By these three was the third part of men killed, by the fire, and by the smoke, and by the brimstone, which issued out of their mouths.(NUCLEAR BOMBS)

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          Alkollü kafadarlar ortalığı bir birine kattı   
Bursa’nın İznik ilçesinde, sahilde alkol alan iki kafadar, daha sonra serinlemek için göle girdi. Gençlerin ikisi de aynı anda sudan çıktı. Fakat alkolün etkisiyle bir birlerini fark etmeyen gençler polisi ve jandarmayı ayağa kaldırdı.Akşam...
          A Libyan ambush, Central Asia’s security wobbles and Mozambique’s loan scandal: The cheat sheet   

All eyes on Libya

It’s been a rollercoaster few weeks for Libya. A spot of good news first: Libya is pumping oil at its highest rate in four years, an important boon for a country that relies heavily on the petroleum industry. Now for a bunch of bad: This week, a convoy from the UN Support Mission in Libya was ambushed and, according to reports, their staff taken at gunpoint. The UN now says its staff are all safely in Tripoli, but the incident is yet another a sign of the chaos in Libya, where multiple forces claim authority and there is heavy fighting in some parts of the country, including Benghazi. The UN has just appointed a new envoy to the country – a former Lebanese minister of culture – a process that took four months, after the US rejected a Palestinian appointee because of his nationality, followed by retaliatory objections to other candidates from Russia and other countries. UNISMIL and various UN agencies have been gradually increasing their presence on the ground in the dangerous country, but this week’s ambush is likely to be a major setback. And with Italy threatening to deny entry to foreign ships docking on its shores – an effort to force its European partners to do more about the massive influx of migrants, mostly coming from Libya – the internal divisions and external debate over Libya make it one to watch. 

Au revoir UNOCI

While it’s something to celebrate, the closure today of the UN’s peacekeeping mission in Cote d’Ivoire (UNOCI) has also generated some concerns. Although Cote d’Ivoire is one of Africa’s fastest growing economies, two mutinies this year by disgruntled soldiers suggests it has not fully healed from the 2002-2003 civil war and the post-election violence of 2010-2011. Human Rights Watch has called on the Ivorian government to address the rights issues at the root of past political violence, including the problem of impunity and the need to professionalise its security forces. It also pointed to the incomplete national reconciliation process and continued competition over land as potential flashpoints. With the peacekeepers’ withdrawal, a UN Security Council briefing noted the need for the international community to stay engaged. In a statement to the council, Sweden said the closure of UNOCI meant the “UN presence in the country is facing a ‘financial cliff’. This risks undermining the sustainability of the gains achieved.”

Is Afghanistan pulling Central Asia into chaos?

That’s the question at the heart of this new report from the Center for Strategic and International Studies. While Afghanistan’s downward spiral has been plotted meticulously by journalists and analysts, Central Asian states are often overlooked – to our potential peril, according to CSIS. The report notes that security has taken a nosedive throughout in Afghanistan in the past couple years, but asserts: “In the provinces of Afghanistan adjacent to Central Asia, the security situation has deteriorated even further than in Afghanistan as a whole on average.” That situation presents huge challenges to Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, which could become destabilized by smuggling, Taliban attacks and infiltration by extremists, among other threats. The report suggests some measures Afghanistan and its neighbours can take to mitigate those risks – including sealing borders and negotiating with the Taliban – but of none of them would be easy.

Seven more years

Few African leaders divide international public opinion as much as Rwandan President Paul Kagame, who will run for a third term in office in August, having overwhelmingly won a referendum to change the constitution in 2015. Kagame’s champions see him as the architect of stability and growth in a country where some 20 percent of the population was slaughtered in the 1994 genocide. They point to free basic education for all, the halving of infant and maternal mortality, and the emergence of a vibrant economy as achievements which merit his re-election. Detractors say Kagame’s authoritarian style and intolerance of opposition – some of whose leaders have been killed or disappeared, others accused of the cardinal sin of “genocidal ideology” – is a threat to democracy itself. Further evidence of this came in May, when politicians were told that all social media or online campaign content had to vetted by the National Electoral Commission 48 hours before publication. This rule was shelved a month later in the wake of domestic and international pressure, but the attempt to control the messaging will not be forgotten. Still, Kagame’s re-election is pretty much a foregone conclusion: he won with more than 95 percent in 2003 and 93 percent in 2010. Rwanda’s is one of four key African elections being held this year: the people of Kenya and Angola will also go to the polls in August, while Liberians will follow suit in October.

Did you miss it?

Lifting the lid on a Mozambique’s loan scandal

As scandals go, Mozambique’s $2.2 billion secret loan deal that crashed its economy was pretty bad (See IRIN’s report). But now we’re getting a handle on just how corrupt it all was. The recently-released executive summary of the Kroll audit report suggests that the Privinest Group – which was supposed to supply Mozambique with a tuna fishing fleet and maritime security vessels – overcharged by at least $700 million. For example, fishing boats were invoiced at $22 million each, but Kroll estimates the real price should have been just $2 million. And there’s more. Kroll says that $500 million “remains unaudited and unexplained”, on top of the $700 million overcharge. That’s partly because Privinest as well as the state security service, SISE, local banks and the Ministry of Finance all refused to provide the auditors with information requested. For more on the scandal, for which Mozambicans are being forced to pay the price as the economy totters and social services are scaled back, check out Mozambique News reports & clippings.

The unpromised land

Few places these days can be described as hospitable towards asylum seekers, but in recent years Israel has outdone most other states with its policies of deterrence and detention. Not content with keeping asylum seekers confined to so-called “open” detention facilities like Holot, starting in 2014, the authorities began offering one-way tickets to “safe” third countries in Africa. By the time IRIN reported on these “voluntary” deportations in April 2015, it was already clear that those who accepted the offer to go to Uganda or Rwanda, the two countries that had quietly stepped up to receive Israel’s unwanted asylum seekers, did not fare much better than those who opted to remain at Holot. This week, a year-long investigation into Israel’s “relocation process” by Andrew Green for Foreign Policy revealed that the vast majority of Eritrean and Sudanese asylum seekers who are sent to Uganda and Rwanda from Israel are quickly smuggled into neighbouring countries where they have even less protection and live in undocumented limbo. Meanwhile, Ugandan and Rwandan officials continue to deny having made any agreement with Israel to receive asylum seekers.

Watch out for an upcoming IRIN film – Unwelcome Stranger - about the life of a Sudanese asylum seeker in Israel.

(TOP PHOTO: Two soldiers from forces operating under Libya's Tripoli-based government walking through the deserted streets of Bin Jawad. Tim Wescott/IRIN)

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201501270911460310.jpg News Conflict Politics and Economics This week’s humanitarian outlook IRIN GENEVA Global
          Written Answers — Foreign and Commonwealth Office: *No heading* (28 Jun 2017)   
Lord Alton of Liverpool: Her Majesty's Government whether they are considering opening a commercial section in the UK embassy in Khartoum; and, if so, what account they will take of (1) the World Bank’s assessment of Sudan as a suitable place to undertake business, (2) the Khartoum regime’s conduct toward their ethnic and religious minorities, and (3) the bombardment of civilians in the Jebel Marra region...
          7/1/2017: Markets: Beating Volatility: Madhusudan Kela Quits as Reliance Cap’s Chief Investment Strategist   
Mumbai: Madhusudan Kela has quit as the chief investment strategist of Reliance Capital. The former star fund manager will now be a part-time advisor to the financial services firm of the Anil Ambani Group, the company said in an exchange filing. “Mr...
          Sudanlı üçüzlere Recep, Tayyip, Erdoğan isimleri verildi   
T.C. Sağlık Bakanlığınca Sudan Nyala'da insani yardım amaçlı işletilen hastanede bayramın ikinci günü doğan üçüzlere Recep, Tayyip ve Erdoğan isimleri konuldu.
          Who's Allowed Into the US Under the Revised Travel Ban   

On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled that parts of Donald Trump’s travel ban were acceptable, leading the State Department to create a set of new guidelines on the ban, which applies to nationals from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen, with a few exceptions. To travel to the US from those six Muslim-majority…

Read more...


          As South Sudan's civil war rages, cholera takes deadly toll   

Clasping frail arms around his stomach, Machar Weituor doubles over in pain as he slowly positions himself over the hole in his bed. Too feeble to make it to the toilet, the 40-year-old groans faintly as he defecates into a bucket.


          The United Nations: Voice Of The Voiceless?   

Every day we hear about violence and human rights abuses around the world, often feeling angry and helpless about the situation – because it doesn’t appear to be getting any better. Many people are also disillusioned with the response – or lack of response – from the United Nations (UN) in such situations. This is exactly how I felt when attending the meeting of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva or the UN Forum on Minority Issues. Attending the sessions did not help with my disappointment in the UN, however, the experience helped me to better understand the massive challenges facing the UN. When sitting in the sessions in the main meeting room at the Palais des Nations, the ‘Human Rights and Alliance of Civilizations Room’, under the most extraordinary ceiling one could imagine, I was listening to oral submissions by NGOs (Non-Governmental Organisations). One after another, with sometimes forty to fifty NGO submissions per session. Each submission detailed instances of human rights violations in different parts of the world. Mass murder, killings, persecution, sexual violence, abuse, slavery, discrimination – but these are just words. However, in that room, the words were given meaning, a story, often with graphic details, the words of each NGO telling the UN about the suffering and pain of the people they represent.

Palais des Nations, United Nations Office in Geneva. (Photo by FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Despite all the pain and suffering detailed in these reports, both to the UN Human Rights Council and the UN Forum on Minority Issues they are only the tip of the iceberg.

Most people who have experienced violations of their human rights are not represented at the UN – the bars to representation there are many and the cost is prohibitive. Stories are told at the UN primarily through representation by NGOs – NGOs, furthermore, who would have to be able to travel to Geneva to attend any of the aforementioned sessions. The expense of such travel is outside the budget constraints of a majority of NGOs. It would also be necessary for the representing NGO to gain a consultative status of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), which can be a difficult process, and stories of NGOs being denied accreditation continue to circulate. Without such accreditation, the ability of NGOs to fully communicate to the highest levels within the UN are limited; they may submit reports for UN Universal Periodic Review; they may attend the UN through invitation from other, larger NGOs, or member states; but there is no chance to speak, in their own capacity, to an assembled group of experts, United Nation staff and representatives of member states, as well as journalists and other invited parties. Despite the fact that a key purpose of the UN should be to give a voice to the voiceless, the bureaucracy and limits placed on civil society NGOs which prevent their involvement there limit the ability of the oppressed to communicate their suffering.

Most recently, at the beginning of February, an application for consultative status by Christian Solidarity Worldwide, an NGO working to promote the right to freedom of religion or belief and so raising awareness about the persecution of Christians around the world, was rejected after almost eight years of deferment.  The decision to reject their application is surprising, especially after recent reports naming Christianity as the world’s most persecuted religion, making CSW’s area of work more important than ever. As the situation of Christians around the world is deteriorating, the persecuted need more voice. Are there too many accredited NGOs representing persecuted Christians at the UN? Although the list of accredited NGOs includes many who may include working with persecuted Christian communities as part of a wider brief or mission, the number of specialist NGOs in this field who have gained accreditation is limited.

The broken cross of a Christian Church is seen in the town of Qaraqosh. (Photo by THOMAS COEX/AFP/Getty Images)

If the issues the NGO is working on require attention, require UN assistance, and there is not enough representation at the UN, why would the UN Committee on Non-Governmental Organisations reject the application? The answer may lie in the mechanism of approval by member states. Greece, Israel, United States, and Uruguay voted in favor of the accreditation. However, Burundi, China, Cuba, India, Iran, Nicaragua, Pakistan, South Africa, Sudan, Turkey, and Venezuela voted against. The list of countries rejecting the accreditation speaks a thousand words. Pakistan is ranked 4th on the recently released Open Doors World Watch List 2017, a ranking of 50 countries where Christians are most persecuted. Sudan was placed 5th, followed by Iran in 8th, India in 15th, Turkey in 37th, and China in 39th place. And so the UN allowed states that are notorious for allowing the persecution of Christians in their territories to silence a voice that persecuted Christians so desperately need. Permitting states to cover up their own shortcomings by filtering those who would report them, has created a lack of accountability in the UN system.

Bureaucratic flaws in the decision-making apparatus at the UN, such as that detailed above, are contributing factors to the disillusionment felt by many at the UN’s lack of response to human rights violations. Preventing NGOs from speaking out on the human rights issues that affect those they represent further stifles the ability to prevent those abuses and means the UN will continue to fail those suffering the most across the globe.


             
Divisions Among Gulf Arab States Increases Instability in the Horn of Africa
Gulf Cooperation Council isolation of Qatar impacts Djibouti, Eritrea, Somalia, Somaliland, Ethiopia and Sudan

By Abayomi Azikiwe
Editor, Pan-African News Wire
Thursday June 29, 2017

A dispute over territory involving the Horn of Africa states of Djibouti and Eritrea was reignited in the aftermath of the withdrawal of Qatari military forces stationed on the border of the countries on June 13.

Doha had served as a mediator in competing claims over Ras Doumeira Mountain and Island on the Red Sea coast near Bab al-Mandab Strait, a strategic shipping lane. Qatari troops were stationed in the area to prevent the potential of a resumption of armed clashes which erupted between Djibouti and Eritrea during June 10-13, 2008.

Qatari military forces serving as peacekeepers pulled out their personnel without any stated reasons. Speculation surrounding the Qatari moves suggests that the burgeoning split among the Gulf monarchies with Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain making demands on Doha amid the imposition of an economic embargo, prompted the withdrawal from Ras Doumeira.

Djibouti and the self-declared independent Somaliland are supporting the position of Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain against Qatar. Somalia, Sudan and Ethiopia which are also supporting the claims against Qatar have as well called for talks to resolve the differences within the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC).

Eritrea, which allows the UAE and Saudi Arabia to utilize its port at Assab for military purposes partly related to the ongoing war in Yemen, has taken a cautious line diplomatically on the confrontation despite being affected by the split in the GCC. Nevertheless, most media accounts indicate that Asmara is siding with Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain in their differences with Doha.

Seaport facilities and airports in Eritrea have been upgraded to accommodate the continuous bombardments of Yemen by Saudi and UAE warplanes aimed at defeating the Ansurallah movement which the GCC says is supported by the Islamic Republic of Iran. Yemen has been subjected to daily airstrikes and ground operations since March 2015 aimed at driving the Ansurallah (Houthis) from large swaths of territory inside the most impoverished nation in the Middle East.

Qatar has been accused by other GCC states of funding international terrorism, maintaining a Turkish military base on its territory and assisting the foreign policy aims of Tehran. Doha has categorically rejected the allegations and refuses to agree to the conditions called for by Riyadh, the UAE and Bahrain.

Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain with the support of Egypt on June 23 presented thirteen demands for Qatar to adhere to within ten days. These issues include the closing of Al Jazeera television network, the downgrading of relations with Iran, halting the funding of 59 targeted individuals and 12 entities labelled as terrorists such as the Muslim Brotherhood, Hezbollah and ISIS, and the removal of the Turkish military base in Doha.

Origins of the Present Territorial Dispute and its International Implications

The disagreements involving Eritrea and Djibouti over Ras Doumeira are directly a by-product of the demarcation of African colonized territories during the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries where the European imperialist states of Italy and France carved up the area. Later in 1935, Rome and Paris decided to apportion significant areas in Djibouti (then French Somaliland) to Eritrea then under Italian control.

After the defeat of Italian imperialism led at the time by Benito Mussolini during World War II, Eritrea became a British Protectorate and was eventually federated to Ethiopia in 1952. Later in 1962, Eritrea was incorporated into Ethiopia over the objection of the people in the former Italian controlled outpost.

Djibouti did not win its independence from France until 1977 which was relatively late in comparison to other previously colonized East African states. Eritrea proclaimed independence in 1991 after the three decades-long armed struggle and the collapse of the Ethiopian government of Mengistu Haile Mariam that same year. Two years later, in 1993, an internationally-supervised election in Eritrea garnered the state recognition by the-then Organization of African Unity (OAU) and the United Nations.

In April 1996, just five years after Eritrea had gained independence, the new government nearly went to war with Djibouti after Asmara was accused of shelling the disputed territory of Ras Doumeira. The crisis deepened by April 16, 2008 when Djibouti reported that Eritrean troops had established military fortifications digging trenches on the border near Ras Doumeira.

The Djibouti government sent a letter to the United Nations requesting intervention saying a revised map published by Asmara claimed Ras Doumeira as Eritrean land. Conversely, Eritrea claimed it had no territorial problems with Djibouti denying that troops had been deployed to the border areas.

Former Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi responding to the escalating tensions on May 15, 2008 asserted that the disagreement was a "threat to the peace and security of the whole Horn of Africa" noting Addis Ababa had no choice other than securing its trading route through Djibouti if war erupted. Ethiopia, a landlocked state, has been dependent upon Djibouti for access to the Red Sea since Eritrea declared independence in 1991.

On June 10 of the same year, the Djibouti government reported that 21 Eritrean troops in the area defected to their side of the border. Eritrea demanded the repatriation of the soldiers opening fire on the Djibouti forces.

Clashes continued for three days claiming the lives of an estimated 140 soldiers on both sides of the conflict. Djibouti called up retired military and police units to engage in the battle.

France, which has a large military base along with the United States at Camp Lemonnier, provided logistical and technical support to Djibouti. The fighting ended after three days. Later in 2010, Qatar agreed to station 450 troops in the Ras Doumeira border area to prevent further fighting. The UN said in 2009, that Eritrea had failed to withdraw its forces from the Ras Doumeira areas under dispute.

The withdrawal of Qatari soldiers has raised the specter of renewed clashes between the two nations. Djibouti’s UN Ambassador Mohammed Idriss Farah claims that Eritrea has moved into the areas previously held by Qatari troops.

Djibouti has filed a formal complaint with the African Union (AU) over the alleged activity of Eritrean troops. Farah stated that: "Eritrean troops occupied the Dumeira Mountain immediately after Qatar's peacekeepers left. Sometimes the Eritrean troops go to the top of the mountain and return on the other side. What makes this one different is that they moved in right after the peacekeepers left."

Eritrean envoy to the AU, Araya Desta, said of the current situation:“We don’t want to take any of Djibouti’s land. The last time we had some skirmishes. It was unnecessary.”

AU Must Take Decisive Action to Avoid Border War

The AU Peace and Security Council (PSC) issued a statement after the complaint filed by Djibouti over differences with Eritrea. The continental organization convenes its bi-annual summit in Ethiopia on July 3-4.

According to the PSC: “The Chairperson of the Commission, Moussa Faki Mahamat, is following the recent developments between the Republic of Djibouti and the State of Eritrea in the aftermath of Qatar’s decision to withdraw its peacekeeping troops at the Djibouti- Eritrea border. The Chairperson of the Commission appeals for calm, restraint and stresses that the AU is fully seized with the matter. He highlighted that the AU Commission, in close consultations with the authorities in Djibouti and Eritrea, is in the process of deploying a fact-finding mission to the Djibouti-Eritrea border. The Chairperson of the Commission stands ready to assist Djibouti and Eritrea to normalize their relations and promote good neighborliness within the framework of relevant AU instruments.” (http://www.peaceau.org/en/article/press-release-au-commission-calls-for-restraint-on-the-djibouti-eritrea-border)

These developments in the Horn of Africa are a continuation of the conflicts emanating from unresolved European colonial-era border demarcations. Also the current split within the western-allied Gulf Arab governments and the dependence of these African states for economic revenue generated through usage of their territory and waterways, which has compelled AU member-states such as Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea and Egypt to side with the anti-Qatari forces does not bode well for continental security in the long term.

Moreover, the political and security interests of various states in the Middle East which routinely work in conjunction with U.S. foreign policy interests are inevitability the concern of the AU. Consequently, Africa has to pay close attention to events unfolding within the GCC countries and their allies and seek the resolution of these conflicts in a manner which curtails the potential for a destabilizing impact on continental states. 

             
PANW Editor, Abayomi Azikiwe, Featured on Press TV Top Five News Segment on United Nations Peacekeeping Forces Being Reduced in Darfur Region of Sudan
Watch this Press TV Top Five news segment featuring Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire.

To view the interview which was aired live on June 29, 2017 just click on the website below:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aDK94-4tXk

Azikiwe discusses the slashing of United States contributions to United Nations peacekeeping operations which will reduce the number of soldiers and police in the Darfur region of Sudan.

President Donald Trump on the one hand makes cuts to UN contributions yet he is escalating the deployment of Pentagon forces in Somalia, Iraq, Syria, Yemen and Afghanistan.

According to Press TV: "The United Nations Security Council has voted to sharply reduce the international peacekeeping force in Sudan's Darfur region.

"The decision will cut the number of peacekeepers in Darfur by nearly 50 percent.

"It will also reduce the number of international police by nearly 30 percent. The Darfur mission currently costs more than one billion dollars a year.

"The move, which was pressed by the United States, follows Washington’s decision to slash financial contributions to the world body.

"The Darfur conflict began in 2003 when rebel groups took up arms against the government. The U-N and African Union put together a force in 2007 to protect civilians in the region."

             
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast for Sun. June 25, 2017--Hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe
Listen to the Sun. June 25, 2017 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire.

To hear the podcast of this episode just click on the following URL:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/panafricanjournal/2017/06/25/pan-african-journal-special-worldwide-radio-broadcast

The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the United Arab Emirates (UAE) government which stated that Qatar must comply with the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) demands or a permanent severing of relations will occur; Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi says he has ratified the transfer of two islands to Saudi Arabia; Kenyan military forces have detained several United States soldiers for attempting to enter South Sudan illegally; and the Republic of Namibia has been assessed as a success on the African continent.

In the second hour we look back at the 57th anniversary of the independence of the former Belgian Congo which resulted a coup against Prime Minister Patrice Lumumba and his subsequent assassination. Finally we continue our monthlong tribute to Black Music Month with a focus on the life, times and contributions of Etta James.

             
DRC, Migration, Jihadis - Flashpoints at African Union Addis Summit
By Matthew Kay
30-06-2017 to 11:41

Photo: Moussa Faki Mahamat, Chairman of the African Union Commission

Conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and mass migration are likely to dominate discussions as foreign ministers from the 55 African nations gather in Addis Ababa on Friday for two days of talks, ahead of the 29th summit of African leaders next week.

The official theme of this African Union (AU) summit is ‘investment in youth’, but other pressing matters on the continent from the DRC to mass migration are also likely to dominate discussions.

When commission chairman Moussa Faki Mahmat from Chad opens discussions on Friday morning, he was expected to congratulate members of the Union who are sticking to commitments of Agenda 2063, a continental development plan set out by the AU four years ago.

On paper the trends are encouraging – more children in full time education, fewer deaths from preventable diseases and accelerating economic growth.

Conflict in several countries

But flashpoints that often dog discussions at AU summits are likely to do so once again.

They include the ongoing fight against the jihadist group Boko Haram in the lake Chad region, an uptick in violence in South Sudan, Libya, Mali and Darfur.

The alarming numbers of Africans making the perilous trip across the Mediterranean is also of immediate concern.

On top of that, major reforms of the Union itself are on the table – including changes to how the AU is funded that are being pushed by several leaders, including current chairman and Guinean president Alpha Condé.

He wants all nations to implement a 0.2 percent levy on imports to fund the club that has for years been overly reliant on Western handouts.

             
US Pressure: UN Agrees on Deep Cuts to Peacekeeping
AFP, United Nations

A deal on cutting nearly $600 million from the UN peacekeeping budget was reached Wednesday following weeks of negotiations over US demands for sharp cost reductions, UN diplomats said.

Under the deal reached by a General Assembly budget committee, the United Nations will spend $7.3 billion on peacekeeping in the coming year, down from the current $7.87 billion -- roughly a seven percent cut -- according to diplomats familiar with the negotiations.

The United States, the biggest financial contributor to peacekeeping, had sought a nearly $1 billion cut to the bill and the European Union had also pushed for savings to bring costs down to $7.3 billion.

US Ambassador Nikki Haley claimed victory in a statement, saying "just five months into our time here, we've already been able to cut over half a billion dollars from the UN peacekeeping budget and we're only getting started."

Hardest hit by the cuts will be the UN missions in Sudan's troubled region of Darfur and in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the two costliest operations with budgets that run over $1 billion.

A Security Council diplomat who spoke on condition of anonymity said however there will be "cuts across the board" in the 13 peacekeeping missions as a result of US pressure.

Washington pays 28.5 percent of the peacekeeping budget and 22 percent of the UN's core budget of $5.4 billion.

French Ambassador Francois Delattre said the deal will allow UN missions to "fully implement their mandate while being more efficient."

"The savings proposed in this budget have been carefully targeted," said Delattre.

The deal falls short of the request from UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who had asked for $7.97 billion for the annual budget which runs from July 1 to June 30 of next year.

It also is less than what African countries had proposed: they wanted $7.7 billion for the UN missions.

The deal is expected to be approved by the UN General Assembly on Friday.

The Security Council is expected to vote as early as today on significant cuts to the 17,000-strong joint African Union-UN mission in Darfur known as UNAMID.

Britain on Wednesday circulated a draft resolution that provides for a two-stage drawdown over the next 12 months, in line with the recommendations of a joint AU-UN report released last month.

The measure would cut UNAMID force levels to reach 8,735 troops and 2,500 police by June 2018, a 44 percent cut in military personnel and nearly 30 percent in police, according to the draft text obtained by AFP.

The drawdown could be reviewed if the Sudanese government fails to ensure protection in those areas from where the peacekeepers will withdraw.

Under the proposed measure, Guterres will report to the council after six months on whether "conditions on the ground remain conducive to further reductions."

The draft resolution welcomes a "reduction in military confrontations between government forces and rebel groups," but rights groups maintain that the conflict in Darfur is far from over.

Human Rights Watch has criticized the proposed cuts as "misguided," saying civilians in Darfur still need protection.

Darfur has been engulfed in conflict since 2003, when ethnic minority insurgents mounted a rebellion against President Omar al-Bashir, complaining that his Arab-dominated government was marginalizing the region.

The United Nations has shut down its mission in Ivory Coast and is planning to pull its peacekeepers out of Haiti in the coming months.

France late Wednesday circulated a draft resolution on renewing the UN mission in Mali, known as MINUSMA, but no cuts are planned.

The mission would continue to operate with 13,289 troops and 1,920 police, according to the draft resolution seen by AFP.

A vote on renewing the Mali mission could take place today.

          Terbiyeli Tavuk Çorbası (Fairy Yemek Tarifleri)   
Yazar: balet
Konu: Terbiyeli Tavuk Çorbası
Tarih: 30.Haz.2017 (GMT 2)

Terbiyeli Tavuk Çorbası

Gülhan Kara

1 parça tavuk göğüs eti
6 su bardağı su
1 adet defne yaprağı
Tuz
2 çorba kaşığı un
1 diş sarımsak
Yarım limonun suyu
1 yumurta sarısı
1 çorba kaşığı sirke (elma ya da üzüm sirkesi)
Üzeri için:
Kekik
Karabiber

Tavuk etini 3-4 parçaya kesip 5 bardak suyla birlikte tencereye koyun. Defne yaprağını ilave edip kaynamaya bırakın. Kaynamaya başladıktan sonra 1 çay kaşığı tuz ekleyin. Etler yumuşayınca sudan alıp bir tabağa çıkarın ve soğumaya bırakın.
Un, limonsuyu, yumurta sarısı, sirke ve ezilmiş sarımsağı küçük bir kasede 1 kepçe tavuk suyu ekleyerek çırpın.
Tavuk etlerini küçük parçalara bölüp kaynamakta olan tavuk suyuna ekleyin. Hazırladığınız terbiyeyi kaynar çorbaya eklerken bir yandan da karıştırın.
Ocağı kısıp kıvam buluncaya kadar bir taşım kaynatın. Sıcak olarak servis yapın.



          Fırında Sebzeli Köfte (Fairy Yemek Tarifleri)   
Yazar: balet
Konu: Fırında Sebzeli Köfte
Tarih: 30.Haz.2017 (GMT 2)

Fırında Sebzeli Köfte

Gülhan Kara

750 gr köftelik kıyma
Yarım bayat ekmek
1 yumurta
1 kuru soğan
Tuz, karabiber, kimyon, kekik
1 tutam kıyılmış maydanoz
2 adet orta boy patates
1 adet orta boy kuru soğan
1 adet kereviz
1 adet kırmızı biber veya havuç
1 çorba kaşığı domates salça
2-3 çorba kaşığı sıvıyağ
1.5 su bardağı su
Tuz

Köfte için bayat ekmeği bir kapta suyla ıslatıp suyu çekip yumuşayana kadar 5-6 dk bekletin. Kıymayı bir kaba alıp rendelenmiş soğan, yumurta, tuz ve baharatı ekleyin. Ekmeği parçalar halinde sudan alın ve elinizle suyunu sıkıp kıymanın üzerine ufalayarak ilave edin. Köfte karışımını yoğurup yuvarlak köfteler yapın. Bir tepsiye dizin.
Sebzeleri soyup yuvarlak ince dilimler halinde doğrayın. Küçük bir tavada yağı ısıtıp salçayı kavurun. Azar azar 1.5 bardak suyu ve yeteri kadar da tuz ekleyip karıştırın.
Köfteleri sebzeleri fırın kabına değişimli olarak dizin. Üzerine salçalı sosu ilave edin. Önceden ısıtılmış 170 derece fırında 35-40 dk kadar pişirin. Sıcak olarak servis yapın.



          Canada’s Dark History in Africa: Killing Natives and Seizing Their Land for Leopold II in Congo   

Canada’s Dark History in Africa: Killing Natives and Seizing Their Land for Leopold II in Congo

A Brutal Part of Canada's Dark History in Africa. The Role of Canada's William Grant Stairs

Global Research, June 30, 2017
Dissident Voice 28 June 2017

Featured image: Aged and Women had to die of starvation under the rule of King Leopold II in Congo. (Source: Annoyz View)

Canada’s 150th anniversary offers a unique opportunity to shed light on some darker corners of Canadian history. One of the dustier chapters is our contribution to one of the most barbarous regimes of the last century and a half.

In a bid to extract rubber and other commodities from his personal colony, Belgian King Léopold II instituted a brutal system of forced labour in the late 1800s. Individuals and communities were given rubber collection quotas that were both hard to fulfill and punishable by death. To prove they killed someone who failed to fulfill a quota soldiers from the Force Publique, the colonial police, were required to provide a severed hand. With Force Publique officers paid partly based on the number collected, severed hands became a sort of currency in the colony and baskets of hands the symbol of the Congo Free State.

King Leopold II (Source: Annoyz View)

Between 1891 and 1908 millions died from direct violence, as well as the starvation and disease, caused by Leopold II’s terror. A quarter of the population may have died during Leopold’s reign, which sparked a significant international solidarity movement that forced the Belgian government to intervene and buy the colony.

Halifax’s William Grant Stairs played an important part in two expeditions that expanded Leopold II’s immensely profitable Congolese venture. The Royal Military College of Canada trained soldier was one of 10 white officers in the first-ever European expedition to cross the interior of the continent and subsequently Stairs led an expedition that added 150,000 square kilometres to Leopold’s colony.

In 1887 Stairs joined the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition, which was ostensibly designed to “rescue” the British-backed governor of Equatoria, the southern part of today’s South Sudan. Scottish merchant William MacKinnon asked famed American ‘explorer’ Henry Morton Stanley to lead a relief effort. At the time of the expedition Léopold II employed Stanley, who had been helping the king carve out the ‘Congo Free State’. Seeing an opportunity to add to his colony, Leopold wanted Stanley to take a circuitous route all the way around South Africa, up the Congo River and across the interior of the continent.

One of ten whites, Stairs quickly became second-in-command of the three-year expedition. Read from a humanistic or internationalist perspective, the RMC graduate’s diary of the disastrous expedition is incredibly damning. Or, as Canadian Parliamentary Poet Laureate George Elliott Clarke put it,

“Stairs’ account of his atrocities establishes that even Canadians, blinded by racism, can become swashbuckling mass murderers.”

Stairs’ extensive diary, which he asked to be published upon his and Stanley’s death, makes it clear that locals regularly opposed the mission. One passage notes,

“the natives made a tremendous noise all night and canoes came close to us, the natives yelling frantically for us to go away” while another entry explains,

“the natives destroyed their food rather than let it fall into the hands of the invaders.”

read more:

http://www.globalresearch.ca/canadas-dark-history-in-africa-killing-natives-and-seizing-their-land-for-leopold-ii-in-congo/5596825




          Comment on Salafism Vs. Wahhabism: Qatar and Saudi Arabia’s Proxy War Rages In Syria Thanks To US Militarism by tapatio   
<b>It doesn't really matter whether they are Wahhabi or Salafist - these animals are NOT Muslims. Mainstream Islam rejects them and they need to be eliminated, their states abolished. These mercenaries exist to further the ends of the Rothschild-Bilderberg predatory capitalist empire. Destroy that empire and the terrorists cease to have a function.</b><b> </b><b>SOLID EVIDENCE THAT THE TERRORIST ATTACKS ON SYRIA AND OTHER COUNTRIES IS THE WORK OF WASHINGTON AND ITS JEWISH MASTERS...........................</b><b> </b><b>Global Warfare: “We’re going to take out 7 countries in 5 years: Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan & Iran” http://www.globalresearch.ca/we-re-going-to-take-out-7-countries-in-5-years-iraq-syria-lebanon-libya-somalia-sudan-iran/5166 A Clean Break: A New Strategy for Securing the Realm (1996) http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article1438.htm "Israel can shape its strategic environment, in cooperation with Turkey and Jordan, by weakening, containing, and even rolling back Syria. This effort can focus on removing Saddam Hussein from power in Iraq — an important Israeli strategic objective in its own right" AND Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century (September-2000) http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/pdf/RebuildingAmericasDefenses.pdf (REMEMBER THAT 9/11 - THE "NEW PEARL HARBOR" - OCCURRED LESS THAN A YEAR AFTER THIS REPORT WAS COMPLETED) "Further, the process of transformation, even if it brings revolutionary change, is likely to be a long one, absent some catastrophic and catalyzing event – like a NEW PEARL HARBOR (9/11 was perfect for that purpose). Domestic politics and industrial policy will shape the pace and content of transformation as much as the requirements of current missions." (p 63) AMERICA'S "RASPUTINS" RESPONSIBLE FOR PLANNING THE LAST 15 YEARS OF DEATH - JEWISH ZIONISTS ALL............... CLEAN BREAK Richard perle REBUILDING AMERICA'S DEFENSES Paul Wolfowitz William Kristol Alvin Bernstein Eliot Cohen David Epstein Donald Kagan Fred Kagan Robert Kagan Robert Killebrew Steve Rosen Gary Schmitt Abram Shulsky Dov Zakheim </b><b>EVERY ONE OF THE TRAITORS LISTED ABOVE (except Robert Killebrew) IS A JEWISH DUAL ISRAELI/US CITIZEN – YET NEITHER THEY OR ANY OF THEIR ANCESTORS CAME FROM PALESTINE..</b><b></b>
          People Are Losing Their Sh*t Over This Picture of IRL Barbie Doll Duckie Thot   

If you take a quick sweep of her Instagram, you'll see that Australian and South Sudanese model Duckie Thot is no stranger to looking pretty much perfect on a daily basis. As an alumna of Australia's Next Top Model (she competed in 2013), Thot knows a thing or two about flashing a killer "smize." But one picture in particular has the internet on its knees, and for good reason. No big deal or anything, but in a picture she posted on Tuesday night, Thot looks exactly like a Barbie doll.

Ducks after dark.

A post shared by Duckie Thot (@duckieofficial) on

Thot looks so Barbie-esque; she better get at least a walk-on role in the upcoming Life Size 2 (although with those looks, she could star in the damn thing). Just about everyone on Instagram agreed, with one user commenting, "Real life Barbie." One added, "I showed this picture to my baby girl & she wanted that doll." Another proclaimed, "MY LIFE HAS BEEN OFFICIALLY SLAYED," and I agree.

But the best response to the frenzy was Thot's own.

While it's so heartening to see a mega-talented model like Thot be appreciated for her work, unfortunately that hasn't always been the case. Last year, fellow model Winnie Harlow made an offensive comment about Thot's natural hair, which she later rescinded via an Instagram apology. Thot clapped back, writing, "It's not fun being bullied for something you can't control and to have a top model woman of colour who I thought encouraged acceptance and self love call me out for rocking my natural hair."

Despite this feud, Thot keeps slaying like the beautiful Barbie she is.

that sundress tho...

A post shared by Duckie Thot (@duckieofficial) on

Hands on 🤘🏿

A post shared by Duckie Thot (@duckieofficial) on



          Tuoba poseidonis sudanensis Lewis, 1963   
Taxon "Tuoba poseidonis sudanensis Lewis, 1963" has been added by A.D. Barber via the webinterface on 2010-07-08T12:30:58+00:00
          OFAC impone multa a aseguradora AIG por violar embargo a Cuba, Irán y Sudán   
OFAC impone multa a aseguradora AIG por violar embargo a Cuba, Irán y Sudán
junio 29, 2017

Un comunicado de OFAC expresa que las violaciones de AIG concernientes a
Cuba se refieren a coberturas de seguros para envíos de mercancías desde
o hacia la isla, en 29 ocasiones, con un costo total de $3,679 dólares.
La Oficina de Control de Activos Extranjeros (OFAC, por sus siglas en
inglés) impuso una multa de $148,698 dólares a la compañía
estadounidense de seguros American Internacional Group (AIG) por violar
las sanciones económicas a Irán, Sudán y Cuba.

Un comunicado de OFAC expresa que las violaciones de AIG concernientes a
Cuba se refieren a coberturas de seguros para envíos de mercancías desde
o hacia la isla, en 29 ocasiones, con un costo total de $3,679 dólares.

AIG con sede en New York, reconoció voluntariamente que había cometido
555 violaciones aparentes a las sanciones económicas en vigor a Irán,
Sudán y Cuba, impuestas por Estados Unidos, dijo el comunicado.

Desde el 20 de noviembre de 2007, hasta el 3 de septiembre de 2012, AIG
incurrió en esas violaciones, al proveer cobertura de seguros a varios
envíos de mercancías hacia o desde esos tres países.

Esta es la tercera multa que OFAC impone en lo que va de año a empresas
o entidades estadounidenses por violar las sanciones a Cuba.

El pasado 8 de junio, una subsidiaria en Canadá de la empresa American
Honda Finance Corporation pagó una multa de $87,255 dólares para
liquidar su posible responsabilidad civil por aparentes violaciones al
embargo estadounidense a Cuba.

OFAC impuso la multa a esa compañía por financiar 13 acuerdos de
arrendamiento de vehículos a la Embajada cubana en Ottawa entre el 2011
y el 2014.

El 12 de enero, la Alianza para una Política Responsable hacia Cuba, con
sede en Tampa, acordó con OFAC pagar $10,000 dólares por violar los
reglamentos del organismo durante múltiples viajes no autorizados a
Cuba, entre el 23 de agosto del 2010 y septiembre del 2011.

(Redactado por Pablo Alfonso, con información de OFAC)

Source: OFAC impone multa a aseguradora AIG por violar embargo a Cuba,
Irán y Sudán -
https://www.martinoticias.com/a/ofac-mpone-multa-a-aseguradora-aig-violar-embargo-cuba-iran-sudan-/147873.html
          How An Army Officer And Diplomat Wrote His Way Through Trauma   
In five wars over 10 years, Ron Capps shifted back and forth between being a U.S. Army officer and a State Department foreign service officer in some of the world's deadliest places. In Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, he served as a senior military intelligence officer. In wartime Kosovo, Darfur and Rwanda, he worked as a diplomat out in the field, documenting violence and war. As he writes in his new memoir, all the while he was almost daily "in the midst of murder, rape, the burning of villages, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ethnic cleaning or genocide." Slowly, Capps watched his State Department and Army careers disintegrate along with his 20-year marriage. He was haunted by the dead civilians of Kosovo, Darfur and other conflicts. At one point, in the Darfur region of Sudan, he found himself on the edge of committing suicide — then the phone rang, startling him and bringing him back. Capps has chronicled his struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder in his memoir,
          Comment on Why South Africa returns to its darkest moment?? by Gatchak Tut Jock Jek   
of course, happened now to South Sudan opposition leader Dr Riek Machar has detained without trial in south Africa why? any wrong ideals must be reappears what is the uses of world? like Nelson Mandela was poisoned without guilty lastly he was became South Africa president WHO termed as criminal. sorry I know very well South Sudanese will be suffered a lot in absent of Dr Machar while worldwide and even the SPLA regime of jce will call for him to rose South Sudan again.
          Sud Sudan, a 2 anni dall’indipendenza   
La lenta transizione verso i due Stati dopo il referendum di due anni fa
          DailyTimes | US 'concerned' over Sudan human rights record: embassy   
KHARTOUM: The United States remains "very concerned" about Sudan's human rights record given the restrictions on religious and med .
          12 Jobs at The East African Community, Apply Before 21 July 2017   
The East African Community is a regional intergovernmental organization comprising the
Republic of Burundi, the Republic of Kenya, the Republic of Rwanda, , Republic of South Sudan, the United Republic of Tanzania and the Republic of Uganda with its Headquarters in Arusha, Tanzania.

The EAC mission is to widen and deepen economic, political, social and cultural integration to improve the quality of life of the people of East Africa through increased competitiveness, value added production, trade and investments.

This is an exciting opportunity for highly motivated and result-driven professionals who are citizens of East African Community Partner States (Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda) to apply for the following position tenable at East African Community-Secretariat.

Trade Officer – Internal Trade Information
(EAC/HR/2016-17/20)
Job Purpose:
To compile, analyse and disseminate EAC trade data through preparation of EAC Annual Trade reports plus uploading and managing trade data in the EAC Trade Help Desk.

Human Resources Officer
(EAC/HR/2016-17/19)
Job Purpose:
To implement EAC’s HR policies that select, develop and retain the right staff needed to meet EAC’s Objectives.

EAC Integrated Health Programme – Monitoring and Evaluation Officer
(EAC/HR/2016-17/24)
Job Purpose:
To oversee implementation of monitoring, evaluation and learning activities under the EIHP and build the capacity for health sector monitoring and evaluation at the EAC Secretariat.

EAC Integrated Health Programme – Linkages and Partnerships Officer
(EAC/HR/2016-17/24)
Job Purpose:
The Partnership Officer will help weave collaborative relations that enable EIHP to effectively fulfil its mission and specific objectives. He/she will identify and nurture such relations focusing primarily on funding, program development and communications.

Senior Standards Officer – Metrology
(EAC/HR/2016-17/18)
Job Purpose:
Ensure accuracy of measurements in the region to promote fair trade practices

Senior Customs Officer – Legal and Compliance
(EAC/HR/2016-17/17)
Job Purpose:
To support and assist the development and implementation of EAC Customs compliance programmes and review of customs laws to strengthen enforcement.

Senior Customs Officer – Information Management Officer
(EAC/HR/2016-17/16)
Job Purpose:
To support the development and implementation of customs IT systems and solutions to facilitate the EAC Single Customs Territory.

Principal Human Resource Officer
(EAC/HR/2016-17/15)
Job Purpose:
To initiate, formulate and manage Human Resource Management and Development policies and strategies that will enable the Community to attract, develop and retain high quality human resources.

Deputy Registrar Finance and Administration
(EAC/HR/2016-17/21)
Job Purpose:
To provide strategic leadership in the process of coordinating and facilitating utilization of the Court’s human and financial resources in accordance with the provisions in the Staff Rules and Regulations and the financial rules and regulations and other decisions and directives issued from time to time.

Deputy Clerk Finance and Administration
(EAC/HR/2016-17/22)
Job Purpose:
To be responsible for the coordination and facilitation of the processes that promote better utilization of the Assembly’s human and financial resources in accordance with the provisions of the relevant Staff and Financial Rules and Regulations and other decisions and directives issued from time to time by the Assembly, the EALA Commission, the Council and the Clerk.

Director Customs
(EAC/HR/2016-17/14)
Job Purpose:
To coordinate and manage the development, implementation and monitoring of regional customs programmes and projects in the EAC for the effective realization of a functioning Customs Union

Registrar – EAC Competition Authority
(EAC/HR/2016-17/23)
Job Purpose:
The Registrar, EAC Competition Authority shall be the Chief Executive Officer of the EAC Competition Authority and be responsible for the day to day management of the EAC Competition Authority subject to the directives of the Commissioners.

Eligibility:
EAC Staff Rules and Regulations preclude considerations of applicants above 55 years of age.

Terms and Conditions of Service:
The above position is tenable for a contract of five (5) years renewable once .

Fringe Benefits:
The established posts offer attractive fringe benefits including housing allowance, transport allowance, education allowance, a medical scheme, and insurance cover.
Equal Opportunity:
The EAC is an equal opportunity employer; therefore, female candidates are particularly encouraged to apply. EAC will only respond to those candidates who strictly meet the set requirements.

How to Apply:
Interested candidates who meet the qualification and experience requirements for the above mentioned positions are advised to send their applications, detailed curriculum vitae, photocopies of academic certificates, names and contact details of three referees, and copy of National Identity Card, or Birth Certificate or Passport showing date of birth. Please quote the respective reference number on both the application letter and envelope. For electronic submission, please quote the respective reference number on the subject of the email and send to the address given below.
Applications should be submitted to the address below not later than Friday, 21 July 2017.

Please note:
You may submit your application either electronically or in hard copy but not both.
Applications which do not: indicate nationality and age; the reference number; or have an application letter attached; have certified copies of their academic degrees and other professional Certificates; or fail to provide three referees will be disqualified.
Only qualified candidates will be contacted
EAC Staff Rules and Regulations preclude considerations of applicants above 55 years of age.
Please note that EAC does not require candidates to pay money for the recruitment process. All invitations for interviews will be done in writing

APPLY ONLINE THROUGH
E-mail: vacancies@eachq.org

OR
The Secretary General
East African Community
P. o Box 1096
Arusha – Tanzania.
Tel: +255 27 2162100
Fax: +255 27 2162190
Website : www.eac.int
Application Deadline:
Friday, 21 July 2017 – 5:00pm
          I Predatori dell'Oro Nero e della Finanza Globale   

Benito Li Vigni, uno dei massimi esperti internazionali in fatto di oro nero, indaga a tutto campo sui legami tra «mondo del petrolio» e potere politico-finanziario e inquadra con lucida obiettività le verità nascoste che riguardano il futuro dei giacimenti, le guerre, le tensioni geopolitiche e l’uso dell’«arma petrolifera» da parte dei maggiori produttori, primo fra tutti la Russia.

Lungo una sorta di cintura che lega il Sud del mondo, passando dall’Iraq al Sudan e alla Nigeria, per arrivare in Venezuela e Colombia, gli «imperi del profitto» si scontrano e si alleano, alternando una brutale violenza a subdole strategie di potere.

La fame di petrolio spinge a mutamenti epocali negli assetti politici internazionali, basti pensare alla silenziosa colonizzazione cinese dell’Africa e a un evento impensabile come l’affacciarsi della flotta militare di Pechino nel Mediterraneo, o alla possibilità che Cuba ridiventi l’epicentro di nuovi sconvolgimenti legati alla contesa dei giacimenti nel Golfo del Messico.

Ad approfittare di questa opaca realtà sono il «gioco sporco» della finanza americana, la speculazione sul greggio, lo scambio armi-petrolio, la corruzione e il saccheggio dell’economia pubblica italiana da parte di lobby che impongono i loro oligopoli. Le conseguenze di questa predazione sono state l’inarrestabile inquinamento ambientale, la recessione e il rialzo del prezzo del barile.

Uno scenario instabile e caotico nel quale si affacciano la speranza della «svolta verde» di Barack Obama, la sua politica estera improntata alla moderazione e lo scontro etico per regolare un potere economico immorale e senza vincoli, del cui esito, si spera positivo, beneficerà il mondo intero.


          Marti Corn: Lost   
Lost-Corn-03It was a pleasure to reconnect with  Marti Corn at the Denver Portfolio Reviews and spend time with her compelling portraits of the Lost Boys of Sudan. Marti has a legacy of storytelling, in particular, focusing on peoples that are under served and overlooked. Her empathetic and connected approach to portraiture is revealed in her
          Many Evangelicals Want Muslims Banned from U.S.   
On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court temporarily ruled in favor of President Donald Trump’s revised executive order banning Muslims traveling from six predominantly Muslim, Arab states to the U.S. These states are Iran, Syria, Libya, Sudan, Somalia, and Yemen. Muslims from these countries who have a relationship with a U.S. citizen will be allowed into [Read More...]
          Batman Director Matt Reeves Teases "Noir-Driven" Film - Collider Movie Talk   
On this episode of Collider Movie Talk (Wednesday, June 28th, 2017) Kristian Harloff, Jeremy Jahns, Perri Nemiroff, Clarke Wolfe, and Stephanie Gray discuss the following: 
 
-First trailer released for Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
 
-Matt Reeves teases a noir-detective version of ‘The Batman’
 
-Michelle Rodriguez threatens to leave Fast & Furious franchise if female characters don’t improve
 
-Opening This Week – Despicable Me 3, The House
 
-First red-band trailer released for A Bad Moms Christmas 
 
-New trailer released for The Last Face starring Charlize Theron and Javier Bardem
 
-Mail Bag
 
-Live Twitter Questions
 
Sony has released the first Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle trailer. The film centers on four high schoolers who, during their time in detention, come across the ancient, powerful game Jumanji, and are sucked into the game world. Once there, they take on the appearance of avatars played by Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Karen Gillan, and Jack Black. The movie is directed by Jake Kasdan, with a release date set for later this year on December 22nd.
 
With War for the Planet of the Apes landing in theaters next month, director Matt Reeves has already started making the press rounds for the final chapter in the Apes trilogy. And because it’s Batman, the director is already fielding questions about what we can expect to see from his version of The Dark Knight. Speaking with New Trailer Buzz, Reeves talked a bit about his take on The Batman, teasing something fans have wanted to hear for a very long time – a “World’s Greatest Detective” angle that is “noir-driven.
 
The Fast & Furious movies make a point to say how it’s all about family. But if the recent comments made by franchise star Michelle Rodriguez are to be believed, the family is jeopardy of splitting apart. Taking to her Instagram account to help promote the digital release of the latest installment in the series with The Fate of the Furious, Rodriguez shined a light on an issue she’d like to see resolved before she signs on for the next entry.
 
OPENING THIS WEEK
 
BUY OR SELL
 
STX Entertainment has released the first red-band trailer for A Bad Moms Christman. In the upcoming sequel, the underappreciated moms are fighting back against the pressures of the holiday season, with their lives becoming even more stressful when their own mothers come to visit. The film opens November 3rd and stars Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell, Kathryn Hahn, Jay Hernandez, Cheryl Hines, Peter Gallagher, Justin Hartley, David Walton, Christine Baranski, and Susan Sarandon.
 
A new trailer has been released online for The Last Face. Set in war-torn regions of Africa, The Last Face stars Oscar-winners Charlize Theron and Javier Bardem as a pair of doctors who, across treacherous landscapes in Sierra Leone, Sudan, and Liberia, begin a love affair as they clash over how to save lives and combat the dangerous conditions around them, all while maintaining their relationship. The film is directed by Sean Penn and will be released in select theatres and On Demand on July 28th
 
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          Sudan'dan ABD'nin insan ticareti raporuna tepki   
- Sudan, ABD Dışişleri Bakanlığı tarafından "insan ticaretiyle mücadele etmeyen üçüncü grup" ülkeler arasında gösterilmesini kınadı
          US sets new visa rules for six muslim nations   
Refugees looking to enter the United States will have to adhere to new visa guidelines set forth by the Trump administration. Visas already approved will not be revoked, however, new applicants from Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya, Iran and Yemen must prove a relationship with a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling already in the United States to be eligible. Grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, fiancees or other extended family members are not considered to be close relationships. The new rules take effect at 8 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on Thursday, according to the cable, which was obtained by AP. The new rules come after the Supreme Court's decision to reinstate parts of President Trump's oft-criticized travel ban.
          Travel ban goes into effect despite courts saying security issues unfounded   
  • Hawaii questions Trump interpretation of standard for granting visas
  • Border officials told to respect visas for citizens from countries in question

The United States implemented a modified version of Donald Trump’s travel ban Thursday evening on some people from six Muslim-majority countries and certain refugees, citing security concerns that federal courts have declared to be unfounded.

Travel through major US airports appeared to be proceeding as usual, with border officials under orders to respect previously issued visas for citizens from the countries in question: Sudan, Somalia, Iran, Yemen, Syria and Libya.

Continue reading...
          7/1/2017: TIMES BUSINESS: RelCap’s Kela to be non-exec director in arm   
Mumbai: Madhusudan (Madhu) Kela, one of the star fund managers of the 2000s who played a leading role in building Reliance Mutual Fund as one of the top fund houses in India, is moving to a part-time advisory role within Reliance Capital. For the last...
          In Trump's America, immigrant families would be kept apart. He doesn't care | Sohaila Abdulali   

The travel ban ruling doesn’t consider being a grandparent a ‘bona fide’ enough relationship to warrant them entering the country. That’s absurd

For the next 90 days, if you’re coming to the US from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria or Yemen, unless you’ve already got a visa you must be a close relative in order to enter the land of the free and the home of the brave. Grandparents don’t count. Neither do fiance(e)s. These relationships, apparently, are not “bona fide”.

By the tortuous logic of this administration, the fiance part actually makes a malignant kind of sense – anyone can fake an engagement. I can’t believe I just wrote that sentence. But these are the lyin’, cheatin’ times we live in, people. We now operate on the assumption that everyone is a crook. Grandparents, though? Why do they rank behind in-laws?

Continue reading...
          ONLINE INTERNET POLICE   
Internet police is a generic term for police and secret police departments and other organizations in charge of policing Internet in a number of countries. The major purposes of Internet police, depending on the state, are fighting cybercrime, as well as censorship, propaganda, and monitoring and manipulating the online public opinion.

It has been reported that in 2005, departments of provincial and municipal governments in mainland China began creating teams of Internet commentators from propaganda and police departments and offering them classes in Marxism, propaganda techniques, and the Internet. They are reported to guide discussion on public bulletin boards away from politically sensitive topics by posting opinions anonymously or under false names. "They are actually hiring staff to curse online", said Liu Di, a Chinese student who was arrested for posting her comments in blogs.
Chinese Internet police also erase anti-Communist comments and posts pro-government messages. Chinese Communist Party leader Hu Jintao has declared the party's intent to strengthen administration of the online environment and maintain the initiative in online opinion.

The Computer Emergency Response Team of Estonia (CERT Estonia), established in 2006, is an organisation responsible for the management of security incidents in .ee computer networks. Its task is to assist Estonian Internet users in the implementation of preventive measures in order to reduce possible damage from security incidents and to help them in responding to security threats. CERT Estonia deals with security incidents that occur in Estonian networks, are started there, or have been notified of by citizens or institutions either in Estonia or abroad.
Cyber Crime Investigation Cell is a wing of Mumbai Police, India, to deal with Cyber crimes, and to enforce provisions of India's Information Technology Law, namely, Information Technology Act 2000, and various cyber crime related provisions of criminal laws, including the Indian Penal Code. Cyber Crime Investigation Cell is a part of Crime Branch, Criminal Investigation Department of the Mumbai Police.
Andhra Pradesh Cyber Crime Investigation Cell is a wing of Hyderabad Police, India, to deal with Cyber crimes.

Dutch police were reported to have set up an Internet Brigade to fight cybercrime. It will be allowed to infiltrate Internet newsgroups and discussion forums for intelligence gathering, to make pseudo-purchase and to provide services
After the 2006 coup in Thailand, the Thai police has been active in monitoring and silencing dissidents online. Censorship of the Internet is carried out by the Ministry of Information and Communications Technology of Thailand and the Royal Thai Police, in collaboration with the Communications Authority of Thailand and the Telecommunication Authority of Thailand.

The Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) is the only recognised organisation in the United Kingdom operating an Internet ‘Hotline’ for the public and IT professionals to report their exposure to potentially illegal content online. It works in partnership with the police, Government, the public, Internet service providers and the wider online industry.

The Internet Crime Complaint Center, also known as IC3, is a multi-agency task force made up by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C), and the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA).

IC3's purpose is to serve as a central hub to receive, develop, and refer criminal complaints regarding the rapidly expanding occurrences of cyber-crime. The IC3 gives the victims of cybercrime a convenient and easy-to-use reporting mechanism that alerts authorities of suspected criminal or civil violations on the internet. IC3 develops leads and notifies law enforcement and regulatory agencies at the federal, state, local and international level, IC3 act as a central referral mechanism for complaints involving Internet related crimes.

Criminal threatening is the crime of intentionally or knowingly putting another person in fear of imminent bodily injury.

There is no legal definition in English law as to what constitutes criminal threatening behaviour, so it is up to the courts to decide on a case by case basis. However, if somebody threatens violence against somebody, then this may be a criminal offence. In most countries it is only an offence if it can be proven the person had the intention and equipment to carry out the threat. However if the threat involves the mention of a bomb it is automatically a crime.
In most U.S. jurisdictions, the crime remains a misdemeanor unless a deadly weapon is involved or actual violence is committed, in which case it is usually considered a felony.

Criminal threatening can be the result of verbal threats of violence, physical conduct (such as hand gestures or raised fists), actual physical contact, or even simply the placing of an object or graffiti on the property of another person with the purpose of coercing or terrorizing.

Criminal threatening is also defined by arson, vandalism, the delivery of noxious biological or chemical substances (or any substance that appears to be a toxic substance), or any other crime against the property of another person with the purpose of coercing or terrorizing any person in reckless disregard for causing fear, terror or inconvenience.

"Terrorizing" generally means to cause alarm, fright, or dread in another person or inducing apprehension of violence from a hostile or threatening event, person or object.

Crimint is a database run by the Metropolitan Police Service of Greater London which stores information on criminals, suspected criminals and protestors. It was created in 1994 and supplied by Memex Technology Limited. It supports the recording and searching of items of intelligence by both police officers and back office staff. As of 2005 it contained seven million information reports and 250,000 intelligence records. The database makes it much easier for police officers to find information on people, as one officer who used the system stated in 1996:

"With Crimint we are in a new world. I was recently asked if I knew something about a certain car. In the old days I would have had to hunt through my cards. I would probably have said, 'Yes, I do, but . . . '. With Crimint I was able to answer the question in about fifteen seconds. And with Crimint things just don't go missing.
People are able to request their information from the database under data protection laws. Requests have shown that the database holds large amounts of information on protesters who have not committed any crimes. Information is stored for at least seven years. Holding information on people who have never committed any offence may be against people's human rights. A police officer, Amerdeep Johal, used the database to contact sex offenders and threatened to disclose information about them from the database unless they paid him thousands of pounds.

Along with development of the Internet, state authorities in many parts of the world are moving forward to install mass surveillance of the electronic communications, establish Internet censorship to limit the flow of information, and persecute individuals and groups who express “inconvenient” political views in the Internet. Many cyber-dissidents have found themselves persecuted for attempts to bypass state controlled news media. Reporters Without Borders has released a Handbook For Bloggers and Cyber-Dissidents and maintains a roster of currently imprisoned cyber-dissidents

Chinese Communist Party leader Hu Jintao ordered to "maintain the initiative in opinion on the Internet and raise the level of guidance online, An internet police force - reportedly numbering 30,000 - trawls websites and chat rooms, erasing anti-Communist comments and posting pro-government messages." However, the number of Internet police personnel was challenged by Chinese authorities Amnesty International blamed several companies, including Google, Microsoft and Yahoo!, of collusion with the Chinese authorities to restrict access to information over the Internet and identify cyber-dissidents by hiring "big mamas" .
It was reported that departments of provincial and municipal governments in mainland China began creating "teams of internet commentators, whose job is to guide discussion on public bulletin boards away from politically sensitive topics by posting opinions anonymously or under false names" in 2005 Applicants for the job were drawn mostly from the propaganda and police departments. Successful candidates have been offered classes in Marxism, propaganda techniques, and the Internet. "They are actually hiring staff to curse online," said Liu Di, a Chinese student who was arrested for posting her comments in blogs

Internet censorship is control or suppression of the publishing or accessing of information on the Internet. The legal issues are similar to offline censorship.
One difference is that national borders are more permeable online: residents of a country that bans certain information can find it on websites hosted outside the country. A government can try to prevent its citizens from viewing these even if it has no control over the websites themselves. Filtering can be based on a blacklist or be dynamic. In the case of a blacklist, that list is usually not published. The list may be produced manually or automatically.

Barring total control over Internet-connected computers, such as in North Korea, total censorship of information on the Internet is very difficult (or impossible) to achieve due to the underlying distributed technology of the Internet. Pseudonymity and data havens (such as Freenet) allow unconditional free speech, as the technology guarantees that material cannot be removed and the author of any information is impossible to link to a physical identity or organization.

In some cases, Internet censorship may involve deceit. In such cases the censoring authority may block content while leading the public to believe that censorship has not been applied. This may be done by having the ISP provide a fake "Not Found" error message upon the request of an Internet page that is actually found but blocked (see 404 error for details).

In November 2007, "Father of the Internet" Vint Cerf stated that he sees Government-led control of the Internet failing due to private ownership. Many internet experts use the term "splinternet" to describe some of the effects of national firewalls.

Some commonly used methods for censoring content are:

IP blocking. Access to a certain IP address is denied. If the target Web site is hosted in a shared hosting server, all websites on the same server will be blocked. This affects IP-based protocols such as HTTP, FTP and POP. A typical circumvention method is to find proxies that have access to the target websites, but proxies may be jammed or blocked, and some Web sites, such as Wikipedia (when editing), also block proxies. Some large websites like Google have allocated additional IP addresses to circumvent the block, but later the block was extended to cover the new IPs.

DNS filtering and redirection. Don't resolve domain names, or return incorrect IP addresses. This affects all IP-based protocols such as HTTP, FTP and POP. A typical circumvention method is to find a domain name server that resolves domain names correctly, but domain name servers are subject to blockage as well, especially IP blocking. Another workaround is to bypass DNS if the IP address is obtainable from other sources and is not blocked. Examples are modifying the Hosts file or typing the IP address instead of the domain name in a Web browser.

Uniform Resource Locator (URL) filtering. Scan the requested URL string for target keywords regardless of the domain name specified in the URL. This affects the HTTP protocol. Typical circumvention methods are to use escaped characters in the URL, or to use encrypted protocols such as VPN and TLS/SSL.

Packet filtering. Terminate TCP packet transmissions when a certain number of controversial keywords are detected. This affects all TCP-based protocols such as HTTP, FTP and POP, but Search engine results pages are more likely to be censored. Typical circumvention methods are to use encrypted connections - such as VPN and TLS/SSL - to escape the HTML content, or by reducing the TCP/IP stack's MTU/MSS to reduce the amount of text contained in a given packet.

Connection reset. If a previous TCP connection is blocked by the filter, future connection attempts from both sides will also be blocked for up to 30 minutes. Depending on the location of the block, other users or websites may also be blocked if the communication is routed to the location of the block. A circumvention method is to ignore the reset packet sent by the firewall.

Reverse surveillance. Computers accessing certain websites including Google are automatically exposed to reverse scanning from the ISP in an apparent attempt to extract further information from the "offending" system.

One of the most popular filtering software programmes is SmartFilter, owned by Secure Computing in California, which has recently been bought by McAfee. SmartFilter has been used by Tunisia, Saudi Arabia and Sudan, as well as in the US and the UK.

There are a number of resources that allow users to bypass the technical aspects of Internet censorship. Each solution has differing ease of use, speed, and security from other options. Most, however, rely on gaining access to an internet connection that is not subject to filtering, often in a different jurisdiction not subject to the same censorship laws. This is an inherent problem in internet censorship in that so long as there is one publicly accessible system in the world without censorship, it will still be possible to have access to censored material.

Proxy websites are often the simplest and fastest way to access banned websites in censored nations. Such websites work by being themselves un-banned but capable of displaying banned material within them. This is usually accomplished by entering a URL address which the proxy website will fetch and display. They recommend using the https protocol since it is encrypted and harder to block.

Java Anon Proxy is primarily a strong, free and open source anonymizer software available for all operating systems. As of 2004, it also includes a blocking resistance functionality that allows users to circumvent the blocking of the underlying anonymity service AN.ON by accessing it via other users of the software (forwarding client).

The addresses of JAP users that provide a forwarding server can be retrieved by getting contact to AN.ON's InfoService network, either automatically or, if this network is blocked, too, by writing an e-mail to one of these InfoServices. The JAP software automatically decrypts the answer after the user completes a CAPTCHA. The developers are currently planning to integrate additional and even stronger blocking resistance functions.

Using Virtual Private Networks, a user who experiences internet censorship can create a secure connection to a more permissive country, and browse the internet as if they were situated in that country. Some services are offered for a monthly fee, others are ad-supported.

Psiphon software allows users in nations with censored Internet such as China to access banned websites like Wikipedia. The service requires that the software be installed on a computer with uncensored access to the Internet so that the computer can act as a proxy for users in censored environments

In 1996, the United States enacted the Communications Decency Act, which severely restricted online speech that could potentially be seen by a minor – which, it was argued, was most of online speech. Free speech advocates, however, managed to have most of the act overturned by the courts. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act criminalizes the discussion and dissemination of technology that could be used to circumvent copyright protection mechanisms, and makes it easier to act against alleged copyright infringement on the Internet. Many school districts in the United States frequently censor material deemed inappropriate for the school setting. In 2000, the U.S. Congress passed the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) which requires schools and public libraries receiving federal funding to install internet filters or blocking software.[104] Congress is also considering legislation to require schools, some businesses and libraries to block access to social networking websites, The Deleting Online Predators Act. Opponents of Internet censorship argue that the free speech provisions of the First Amendment bars the government from any law or regulation that censors the Internet.

A 4 January 2007 restraining order issued by U.S. District Court Judge Jack B. Weinstein forbade a large number of activists in the psychiatric survivors movement from posting links on their websites to ostensibly leaked documents which purportedly show that Eli Lilly and Company intentionally withheld information as to the lethal side-effects of Zyprexa. The Electronic Frontier Foundation appealed this as prior restraint on the right to link to and post documents, saying that citizen-journalists should have the same First Amendment rights as major media outlets. It was later held that the judgment was unenforcable, though First Amendment claims were rejected.

In January 2010, a lawsuit was filed against an online forum, Scubaboard.com, by a Maldives diving charter company (see scubaboard lawsuit). The owner of the company claimed $10 million in damages caused by users of scubaboard, scubaboard.com, and the owner of scubaboard.com. Individual forum members were named in the lawsuit as "employees" of the forum, despite their identity being anonymous except for their IP address to the moderators and owners of scubaboard.com. This lawsuit demonstrates the vulnerability of internet websites and internet forums to local and regional lawsuits for libel and damages.
          Trump Travel Ban: US Sets Out Visa Criteria   

Media captionImmigration activist Steven Choi: ‘An unjust and discriminatory Muslim ban’ The White House has set new criteria for visa applicants from six mainly Muslim countries and all refugees, requiring them to have a “close” family or business tie to the US. The rules, affecting people from Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen, are […]

The post Trump Travel Ban: US Sets Out Visa Criteria appeared first on How Trend News.


          Haley uses Trump cuts as 'leverage' at UN   
US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley received mixed reviews this week after cheering cuts to the UN's peacekeeping budget and leading efforts to dramatically reduce the organization's long-standing presence in Sudan's embattled Darfur region.

          7/1/2017: Sport: I want to do it all, says new recruit   
AS the oldest of seven children, South Sudan-born Cairns Taipans recruit Kuany Kuany knows a thing or two about helping people out. And, that is exactly what he has promised to do with the Snakes for the next two years, help the NBL club win in any...
          7/1/2017: Sport: NAME GAME NO DOUBLE TROUBLE   

NEW Cairns Taipan Kuany Kuany signing for the next two years got us thinking about dual names. Kuany was born in South Sudan and moved to Melbourne when he was nine years old and went to St. Kevin’s College. He is one of many athletes who have the same...
          Zionism’s Quest for a Purely Jewish State is why Zionism is Inherently Racist   

According to Netanyahu Non-Jewish Refugees threaten the 'National Identity' of Israel i.e. they aren't Jews


Most Jews are in Britain and the United States today because, from 1882 to the first

world war, Jews fled from the Czarist pogroms and sought refuge from anti-semitism.  Because there were no immigration controls until 1905 and even later in the United States, some 2.5 million Jews emigrated.  Less than 2% went to the alleged historical homeland of Jews, Palestine.

It is one of the quaint aspects of Zionism's achievements that Jews too can now be pogromists.  As David Sheen reported on May 29 2013: 
'Last Thursday, May 23, 2013, marked exactly one year to the day when a thousand Jewish Israelis ran rampant through the streets of Tel Aviv, smashing and looting African-operated businesses and physically assaulting any dark-skinned person they came across. Sadly, the Israeli economic, political and religious establishment – who were in large measure responsible for the pogrom – did not respond by working to quash the racism, but rather ramped up their efforts to expel all non-Jewish African people from the country.' 
Miri Regev, who is now Israel's 'Culture Minister' told the crowd that:  "the Sudanese are a cancer in our body". 
In 1905 the Aliens Act was introduced under Prime Minister Arthur James Balfour.  Balfour was quite explicit.  He didn't much like the East European Jews.  He was however a good Zionist because he believed that they should go to Palestine.  Thus it ever was that anti-Semites and Zionists got on like a house on fire.  As you will no doubt know, in 1917 Balfour, now Foreign Secretary, penned a famous letter to Walter Rothschild promising the land of a 3rd party to the Zionists.

What Netanyahu says aloud, Isaac Herzog of the Israeli Labour Party mutters in coded language.  Netanyahu’s reasons as to why the 60,000 African refugees – from Sudan, Eritrea and other hotspots – had to be deported, demonstrate why Zionism is and always will remain a racist movement.
Netanyahu explainedwhy the refugees had to be deported thus:

"If we don't stop their entry, the problem that currently stands at 60,000 could grow to 600,000, and that threatens our existence as a Jewish and democratic state," Binyamin Netanyahu said at Sunday's cabinet meeting. "This phenomenon is very grave and threatens the social fabric of society, our national security and our national identity."

The reason wasn’t that they weren’t genuine refugees, the problem was that they weren't Jewish. David Sheen has drawn up the top 9 Israeli racist politicians who have demonised asylum seekers.  Herzog is at number 5 on the list.  (see below)

Thus Israel refuses to admit any non-Jewish refugee.  Not because their home country is safe or they are not genuine, the excuses of Western opponents of asylum seekers, but because they ‘threaten our national security and our national identity’.  And what is this national identity?  Why being Jewish of course.  Therefore one cannot accept Arabs or non-Jews within the confines of the holy tent.  Racist?  How could it be otherwise?

Tony Greenstein
Another one of the ways that Israeli society becomes increasingly racist is when centrist parties like Labor adopt right-wing rhetoric in order to chase after right-wing votes.

In recent years, Labor has not played the foil to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, but instead acceded to almost all of his hawkish proposals. Instead of standing firm against Israel’s lurch to the right, Labor has attempted to ply votes away from Likud with right-wing proposals.

That tendency has increased ever since Isaac Herzogwas elected to lead the party in November 2013. It has been especially evident in Herzog’s solid support for Netanyahu’s military campaigns in Gaza and the West Bank, but also in his support for expelling Africans from Israel.

It was not always so. When the Knesset first voted to amend the country’s “anti-infiltration” law in January 2012 to sanction the roundup, detention and expulsion of African refugees, Herzog opposed the measure.

When the Knesset voted to amend the law a second time in December 2013, Herzog didn’t show up for the vote. And by the time the Knesset voted to toughen it a third time in December 2014, he voted in favor of the amendment, along with several other Labor lawmakers.

In May 2012, Herzog wrote an opinion piece, challengingarguments by human rights groups that Eritreans in Israel deserved protection as refugees.

In March 2015, Herzog repeatedthis refrainin an attempt to peel anti-African votes away from Netanyahu on the eve of the Israeli national elections, saying, “We need to negotiate with Eritrea on the return of the Eritreans back to Eritrea.”

This year, Labor led a successful effort to abolish the Knesset’s committee on foreign workers, one of the few forums in which the concerns of refugees could receive a hearing in parliament.
In September 2015, Labor publicly complained that Netanyahu’s government has not done nearly enough to expel Africans from the country. In a public statement, Herzog’s Labor Party wholeheartedly adopted the far-right’s propaganda points, insistingwithout any basis that most refugees in Israel have no valid claim to refugee status.

“The crisis of the refugees from Syria is not similar to the issue of the infiltrators from Africa who are mostly migrant workers,” the statement read. “If only Bibi’s government had created immigration laws, it would be possible to send back to their country those who are in Israel for their welfare and for work. But the Likud government is only good at talking, and it is responsible for the troubles of the residents of south Tel Aviv.”

They were promised asylum somewhere closer to home. Then they were discarded — often in a war zone.
Andrew Green
Foreign Policy
June 27, 2017

KIGALI, Rwanda — The man picked Afie Semene and the 11 other Eritreans on the flight from Tel Aviv out of the stream of disembarking passengers as if he already had their faces memorized. He welcomed them to the Rwandan capital, Kigali, and introduced himself as John. He was a Rwandan immigration officer, he explained, there to help smooth their arrival. He collected the travel documents each of them had been issued in Israel and led them past the immigration counter where the rest of the passengers from their flight queued. Nobody stopped them. Nothing was stamped.
They paused briefly at the luggage carousel to scoop up their bags. In the nearly seven years Semene had lived in Israel, he filled an apartment with furniture and kitchen supplies. But when officials there summoned him to a detention facility for asylum-seekers, he had distributed much of what he owned among his friends, unsure if he would ever return. Now his suitcase contained little besides clothes.
The group exited the airport into the humid Rwandan night and crowded into a waiting pickup. The luggage followed in a second truck. The small convoy wound its way through lush, hilly Kigali, past the fenced campus of the regional polytechnic, and into a quiet neighborhood several miles south of the airport. They came to a stop in front of a house the color of a pistachio nut, its second story ringed with white-trimmed porches. Dawn was already breaking as the new arrivals were shown to bedrooms inside. As he fell asleep, Semene still remembers the feeling of relief wash over him. John would return the next day to help them begin their asylum applications, he thought. Maybe he would arrive with the papers granting them refugee status already in hand.

There would be no visas. No work permits. No asylum. None of the things Israeli authorities had promised the 12 Eritreans when they had agreed to relocate to Rwanda a few weeks prior.

Instead, the next day brought new despair: There would be no visas. No work permits. No asylum. None of the things Israeli authorities had promised the 12 Eritreans when they had agreed to relocate to Rwanda a few weeks prior. Instead, John offered to smuggle them into neighboring Uganda, which he told them was a “free nation.” “If you live here, you can’t leave,” Semene recalled John saying of Rwanda. “It’s a tight country. Let me advise you, as your brother, you need to go to Uganda.”

They would need to sneak across the border, since they had no proof of legal entry into Rwanda. (The Israeli laissez-passers had gone unstamped at the Kigali airport the night before, an oversight that now felt suspicious.) But John told them not to worry; he could easily get them into Uganda for a fee of $250. “I have everything,” he said. “Contacts with the government over there. Contacts with the Israeli government. If something happens, I call the Israeli government and they do something for you.”

The alternative, John said, was to remain in the Kigali house, where they would be under constant surveillance. They would have to pay rent, but without documentation, they would not be allowed to work. Semene and the others understood that John was not really giving them a choice. Everyone agreed to the plan.

A few hours later, a van pulled up outside the house and the Eritreans piled in. Several miles from the border with Uganda, the vehicle came to a stop and John urged them out onto the side of the road. It was the last they would see of him.

Semene had made an even more treacherous crossing once before, paying smugglers to ferry him across the Sinai Desert from Egypt into Israel. Under fire from Egyptian border guards, he sprinted the final yards to safety. He had hoped it would be the last time he would ever have to cross a border illegally. But seven years later, feeling betrayed by an Israeli government he had once turned to for safety, he slipped quietly and unofficially into Uganda.
AdHundreds of African asylum-seekers stage a protest along the sea front in Tel Aviv on Jan. 15, 2014. (Photo credit: JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)d caption
For decades after its founding in 1948, Israel welcomed refugees from outside the Jewish faith. The country was an early signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention. In his first official act as prime minister in 1977, Menachem Begin granted refuge to 66 Vietnamese who had been rescued at sea by an Israeli ship. During a visit to the United States later that year, he recalled the St. Louis — a ship loaded with more than 900 European Jews who attempted to flee Germany in 1939 — to explain his decision. The St. Louis’s passengers were denied permission to disembark in Cuba, the United States, and Canada and ultimately returned to Europe. A quarter of the passengers are thought to have died in the Holocaust.

“They were nine months at sea, traveling from harbor to harbor, from country to country, crying out for refuge. They were refused,” Begin said. “We have never forgotten the lot of our people … And therefore it was natural that my first act as prime minister was to give those people a haven in the land of Israel.”

In 2007, then-Prime Minister Ehud Olmert echoed Begin’s act when he granted temporary residency permits to nearly 500 Sudanese asylum-seekers. But as the number of African migrants swelled in subsequent years, Israel’s receptiveness began to flag. The vast majority of the new arrivals were fleeing long-standing authoritarian regimes in Eritrea and Sudan. They chose Israel for many reasons: because it was a democracy, because it was easier to reach than Europe or — for many Sudanese — because it was an adversary of their own government. They hoped that the enemy of their enemy would look kindly on them.

But Israeli authorities soon became overwhelmed. According to the Ministry of Interior, nearly 65,000 foreign nationals — the vast majority from Africa — reached Israel between 2006 and 2013. As the government struggled to accommodate the newcomers, many languished in poor and overcrowded neighborhoods in southern Tel Aviv. Dozens squatted in a park across the street from the city’s main bus station for weeks on end. A handful of high-profile incidents — including the alleged rape of an 83-year-old woman by an Eritrean asylum-seeker in 2012 — dominated media coverage and fueled unease among Israelis, many of whom already fretted that refugees were taking their jobs.

African asylum-seekers sleep in Tel Aviv's Levinski Park during a protest against Israel's immigration policies on Feb. 5, 2014. (Photo credit: JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
By the time Benjamin Netanyahu secured a third term as prime minister in 2013, the tensions had hardened into outright hostility. That year, Israel sealed off its border with Egypt and implemented a raft of policies aimed at making life more difficult for asylum-seekers already in Israel. Then it began secretly pressuring Eritreans and Sudanese to leave for unnamed third countries, a shadowy relocation effort in which Semene and thousands like him are now ensnared.

Israeli officials have kept nearly everything else about this effort secret, even deflecting requests for more information from UNHCR, the U.N. refugee agency. But a year-long investigation by Foreign Policy that included interviews with multiple Eritrean and Sudanese asylum-seekers as well as people involved at various stages of the relocation process — including one person who admitted to helping coordinate illegal border crossings — reveals an opaque system of shuffling asylum-seekers from Israel, via Rwanda or Uganda, into third countries, where they are no longer anyone’s responsibility.
It begins with furtive promises by Israeli authorities of asylum and work opportunities in Rwanda and Uganda. Once the Sudanese and Eritrean asylum-seekers reach Kigali or Entebbe, where Uganda’s international airport is located, they describe a remarkably similar ordeal: They meet someone who presents himself as a government agent at the airport, bypass immigration, move to a house or hotel that quickly feels like a prison, and are eventually pressured to leave the country. For the Eritreans, it is from Rwanda to Uganda. For Sudanese, it is from Uganda to South Sudan or Sudan. The process appears designed not just to discard unwanted refugees, but to shield the Israeli, Rwandan, and Ugandan governments from any political or legal accountability.

While a handful of the Eritreans and Sudanese have managed to maneuver or mislead their way into asylum in Rwanda or Uganda, and dozens more live in a stateless limbo in the Ugandan capital of Kampala, most have given in to the pressure to leave those countries, making dangerous illegal border crossings that leave them vulnerable to blackmail and physical abuse at the hands of smugglers and security forces. Some have continued north to Sudan or Libya in an effort to reach Europe. A few have been captured and killed by Islamic State fighters or drowned on the treacherous Mediterranean crossing.

Officials across several relevant ministries in Israel, Rwanda, and Uganda all issued denials or refused repeated requests for comment. But the nearly identical experiences of asylum-seekers arriving in Rwanda and Uganda, as well as their ability to bypass standard immigration channels and occasionally procure official documents from their handlers, suggests a level of government knowledge, if not direct involvement, in all three capitals.

Semene fled Eritrea in 2007, after four years in the country’s military. Service there is compulsory and it can stretch on indefinitely. Instead of training, conscripts are often forced to work on their commanders’ private farms or for state-owned businesses. The conditions are so restrictive and the compensation so negligible that in 2016 a U.N. Human Rights Council report on the country determined that “Eritrean officials have committed the crime of enslavement … in a persistent, widespread and systematic manner.” During his four years of service, Semene, a small, slight man with an easy smile, was allowed to visit his family only once.

Semene is a pseudonym. Life under military dictatorship instilled in him a deep sense of caution, and he is hesitant to share too many details about his past in case security forces target his family members who still live in Eritrea. Risking imprisonment and possible execution there, he ran — first to a refugee camp in Sudan, where he faced constant shortages of food and water, and then to Egypt. Finding the environment for refugees there only marginally better, he paid smugglers $2,800 to take him across Sinai into Israel. He knew little about the country, except that it was a democracy. “Simply, I try my luck,” he said.

And finally, luck seemed to be on his side. In 2008, Israeli authorities issued him a visa that was renewable every six months. He found a job stocking groceries at a Tel Aviv shop, and applied for official refugee status. “I adopt the place,” he told me, including learning Hebrew. “I adopt their food. I know the language. I see Israel as my country.”

Thousands more asylum-seekers like Semene continued to arrive — mostly from Eritrea, but also from Sudan, including hundreds fleeing a government-perpetrated genocide in the country’s Darfur region. By 2012, a leading Israeli politician was denouncing the asylum-seekers as “a cancer in our body” and residents of south Tel Aviv were organizing protests against them. That same year, the minister of interior suggested making “their lives miserable” in order to dissuade even more from coming.

One way the Israeli government did just that was by erecting a sprawling detention center for asylum-seekers in the middle of the Negev Desert. Operated by the Israel Prison Service (IPS), Holot — which means “sand” in Hebrew — now holds more than 3,000 male asylum-seekers, who had previously been allowed to live and (unofficially) work while they awaited a decision on their refugee applications. Most detainees said they learned they had been randomly chosen to relocate to Holot only when they attempted to renew their visas. They were given days to report to the facility, where they can legally be held for up to a year. Some politicians are pushing to make the sentence indefinite.
Asylum-seekers take part in a day of protest at the Holot detention center in the southern Negev desert on Feb. 17, 2014. (Photo credit: ILIA YEFIMOVICH /Getty Images)
Semene was summoned to Holot in early 2014. “It’s really a prison,” is how he described what appears on the outside to be a beleaguered tent city. I made two visits to the facility, though I was not allowed to enter. Instead, I sat with detainees outside the chain-link fence topped with razor wire, as they described conditions inside. They live 10 to a room and though they can come and go from the facility, they are required to check in with authorities once per day. Failure to do so earns a short stint in a nearby maximum-security prison. Residents are not allowed to work or even to bring food brought by friends or family members into Holot. With the nearest town hours away, they spend most of their time sitting at the makeshift restaurants they have constructed near the entrance to the camp. IPS authorities regularly tear them down, but the detainees keep rebuilding them.

To Semene, the restrictions of Holot, combined with the monotony of life there, seemed designed to break the occupants — men who had previously survived murderous raids, the deprivations of refugee camps, and, in some cases, torture. There is limited assistance for people managing chronic health conditions or in obvious need of mental healthcare. Instead, they are left to wander the desert, overseen only by their fellow inmates. (IPS did not respond to multiple requests for comment.) Semene remembers becoming so distressed by the treatment one day that he began pleading with a guard: “We are human. Treat us as a human,” he said.

Then, after he had been locked away for seven months, the authorities seemed to offer him a lifeline: Leaflets from the Israeli Population and Immigration Authority started to appear within the facility, saying that Israel had secured an arrangement with other countries willing to accept asylum-seekers. Anyone who agreed to a transfer would receive travel documents, a free one-way plane ticket to a yet-unnamed country, and $3,500. “On the first day of arrival in the country, you will be placed in a hotel. Everything that you need — work and living permit — will be given to you,” the flyer read, according to a translation provided by the UNHCR office in Tel Aviv.

Soon, the guards at Holot began whispering to the asylum-seekers that the third countries were Rwanda for Eritreans and Uganda for the Sudanese. There was no explanation for the division. The Israeli government has never officially confirmed the two countries involved, explaining in various legal settings that the agreements prevent them from doing so. “We do not comment in the media on those issues or on our relations with third countries,” a spokesperson for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in an email.

Semene was among those who jumped at the opportunity. “You close your eyes and choose,” was how he explained it to me. In the weeks leading up to his departure in late 2014, he was summoned to meet with an Israeli immigration officer, who presented him with an Israeli travel document filled out with his name, date of birth, and — though he had no passport — a passport number. The laissez-passer was valid for two weeks, from Dec. 14 to Dec. 28, 2014. The official also showed him a letter, allegedly from the Rwandan government, guaranteeing that he would be granted a one-month tourist visa when he arrived in the country. The official handed over the promised $3,500 in U.S. dollars.
Semene wondered why he was getting a one-month tourist visa when he had been told he would be receiving asylum. He also wondered why the laissez-passer was valid for only two weeks. He said he quizzed the official about both apparent discrepancies, but was assured any issues would be sorted out when he arrived in Kigali. Not quite convinced, he took photos of the documents with his cell phone, which he later showed me. A few days later, he received a call telling him to get ready. He would be leaving on Dec. 22. Despite his growing skepticism of everything the Israeli authorities were telling him, he decided to approach the trip with guarded optimism. It had been more than seven years since he fled a life of endless military service in Eritrea and more than half a year since he’d been incarcerated in Israel. He wanted desperately to believe that Rwanda would be the place where he would finally be free.

A group of Eritrean asylum-seekers inside Israel's Holot detention facility on Feb. 17, 2014. (Photo credit: ILIA YEFIMOVICH /Getty Images) 
The pistachio-colored house where Semene and dozens of other Eritreans were held in Kigali sits at the end of a deeply gashed dirt road. About 50 yards away, down a steep embankment, there is a small kiosk painted Coca-Cola red, where men from the neighborhood often gather to drink sodas and chat. One day last spring, I stopped by to see if they had ever noticed any unusual activity at the house atop the hill. Through a translator, they explained that groups of “foreigners” regularly stayed there. Sometimes they could be spotted pacing on the white-trimmed balconies. None ever seemed to venture outside the house’s heavy black gate and they were always gone after a few days.

Later, I trudged up the hill and knocked on that gate. It swung open to reveal two young Rwandan men lazily sweeping the driveway. I asked if I could speak to the owner. They indicated that he wasn’t home, but passed along a phone number. When I dialed it, a man who identified himself only as Robert acknowledged that the house was indeed his. Yes, he intermittently hosted visitors from Eritrea. In fact, a group had just left a few days earlier.

He explained that he had begun renting out the house to unknown groups of foreigners more than a year earlier after a friend of his — a driver who works at the airport — called to see if he could host some people who would be spending a few days in the country. Robert agreed, he said, because the house was vacant at the time. Since then he has accommodated a handful of groups, he told me. The process is always the same: The driver friend calls him a few days before a new party is set to arrive and Robert sends workers to prepare the house for them. The foreigners stay for a few days — never more than three — and then leave. He didn’t know to where. He had never met any of them.
When I started to press Robert for more details — How much was he paid? Did the driver work for the government? — he grew cagey and insisted we meet in person. We set a time for the following day. When I called back to confirm the location, he hung up on me and declined each of my subsequent calls.

It is unclear whether the driver friend is John, the man who picked Semene and the other Eritreans up from the airport, or someone working for him. It is also unclear whether John is actually an immigration official or just posing as one. But in a country as notoriously repressive as Rwanda it is almost inconceivable that anyone regularly bypassing immigration isn’t operating with the blessing of senior government officials. (My calls from different lines to a number allegedly belonging to John have gone unanswered for months.)

What happens to those asylum-seekers who refuse John’s offer to be smuggled into Uganda is yet another mystery. Kabtom Bereket, an Eritrean who arrived separately from Semene in July 2014, told me that several members of his six-person group asked to visit the UNHCR offices in Kigali immediately after they arrived at the house from the airport. John refused their request, Bereket said, telling them, “We are immigration. There is the security on the gate. You stay here.” No one in the group was allowed out of the house, according to Bereket, which is also a pseudonym, until they all left to cross illegally into Uganda.

Of the at least 1,400 other asylum-seekers who have arrived in Kigali from Tel Aviv over the last three years — the figure Israeli officials provided in court — Semene is certain that the vast majority have been smuggled out of the country.

Some Eritreans have managed to escape the house. According to documents from the UNHCR office in Tel Aviv, Rwandan authorities have arrested at least four of the asylum-seekers who attempted to stay in Kigali on charges of lacking documentation. Others, though UNHCR won’t say how many, have approached UNHCR staff in Kigali for support, claiming to have relocated from Israel. Of the at least 1,400 other asylum-seekers who have arrived in Kigali from Tel Aviv over the last three years — the figure Israeli officials provided in court — Semene is certain that the vast majority have been smuggled out of the country.

Across the border in Uganda, UNHCR officials haven’t heard of even a single successful asylum applicant among the Sudanese arriving directly from Tel Aviv or the Eritreans arriving from Rwanda, though they are aware of multiple rejections from among this pool. This is strange because Uganda has one of the most progressive refugee policies in the region. Nearly 3,300 Sudanese are currently registered as refugees in Uganda, according to the UNCHR office in Kampala. The problem seems to be exclusive to those being resettled from Israel. Sudanese I spoke to in Kampala said they have now learned not to mention Israel anywhere in their asylum applications.

Officials in the office of Uganda’s prime minister, which oversees the country’s immigration procedures, offered no explanation for the rejected asylum claims of migrants arriving via Israel. Rwandan officials do admit having discussed a deal with Israel to accept asylum-seekers, but say that no agreement was ever reached. It may be that the Ugandan and Rwandan governments do not want to answer questions about what they are receiving in exchange for accepting refugees. (Speculation among Israeli activists centers on weapons and cash.)

Unable to get asylum in Uganda, many Eritreans and Sudanese live in constant fear of the authorities. Within hours of his illegal scramble across the Rwandan border, in fact, Semene nearly landed behind bars. He and the other Eritreans in his group emerged from the borderlands thicket to find a van waiting on the Ugandan side that carried them the remaining 10 hours to Kampala. They arrived at a cheap hotel in the crowded, dusty area of downtown known as Old Kampala at 4 a.m. Five hours later, Ugandan security officials raided the hotel and arrested several of the asylum-seekers. By that point, however, Semene had already split off from the group and melted into the neighborhood, his doubts having turned into outright distrust over the course of the journey.

More than a year later, he spends most of his evenings in a local bar watching football matches or playing pool. It is a short walk from the apartment he shares with a rotating group of Eritrean refugees. Sometimes up to a dozen people cram into the one-room space. His world is now just a few blocks of Old Kampala, but he figures limiting his movement is the best way to avoid running into police officers or other security officials who might ask for his papers and then arrest him or demand a bribe when he is unable to produce them.

He is depressed, and also eaten up with resentment toward the Israeli government. This was not the life they promised him. “I am not safe here,” he said. “I am not safe anywhere.”
Ugandan police officers cordon off a crime scene in Kampala on March 17, 2017. (Photo credit: ISAAC KASAMANI/AFP/Getty Images)
The linchpins of this system of human smuggling — and key to establishing whether the Israeli, Ugandan, and Rwandan governments are officially involved in it — are the men who pressure new arrivals from Tel Aviv to forget the promise of asylum and to cross illegally into third countries. Hassan Ali is one such man. He agreed to meet me on the condition that I not reveal his real identity. A squat 32-year-old Darfuri refugee, he steered me off a crowded Kampala street into a fried chicken restaurant with low ceilings and a greasy, tiled floor. He chose a side table and spoke in a quiet, quivering voice lost easily in the lunchtime bustle. He was among the very first asylum-seekers in Israel to accept the proposed transfer to Uganda, he said. He had been in Israel since 2008 and sensed the mood toward asylum-seekers was growing increasingly hostile. He happened to have friends and family in Uganda, so when the offer came to relocate to Kampala in early 2014, he eagerly accepted.
But within weeks of his arrival, just as he was beginning to feel settled in his new life in the city, he started getting phone calls from a man he would identify only as Ismail. Ismail was also Sudanese and he needed Ali’s help. Would he be willing to meet with groups of new arrivals — mostly people Ali knew from his own time in Israel — and talk to them about resettling elsewhere? Ali is not sure how Ismail got his number or why he wanted Ali to be involved, but — for reasons he chose to keep vague — he decided he was willing to try. The requests from Ismail are relatively sporadic, but they have become more frequent. Ali estimates that he has now met with at least a dozen groups of asylum-seekers.

He usually joins them on their second day at an upscale hotel called Forest Cottages, where the Sudanese flown from Tel Aviv are brought from the airport. Unlike their Eritrean counterparts in Rwanda, they are offered a brief respite before the pressure to relocate begins. But when the time comes, Ali is the one who applies that pressure.

He starts by talking about how much the men must be missing their families after years — and in some cases decades — away from Sudan. Except now, in Uganda, they are so much closer to home than they were in Israel. Using Ismail’s connections, Ali says he can get them the rest of the way. For $200, he will arrange the paperwork and logistics to transport them safely to South Sudan, the buffer between Uganda and Sudan. For $100 more, he can get them to the Sudanese capital, Khartoum.
The reasons other refugees chose to return to Sudan, despite the risk of arrest and torture, are much more straightforward: They believe their options are exhausted. They miss their homes. They want to see their families.

Both countries harbor significant dangers. Sudan remains a police state, and killing continues in Darfur, though at a lower level than before. South Sudan is mired in a bloody civil war that has killed tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of people and forced 1.7 million to flee the country. But the new arrivals in Kampala are discombobulated and often poorly informed. Ali fuels their confusion by telling them that Ugandan officials will hound them, blackmail them, and potentially deport them. South Sudan, because of the chaos there, actually seems to some refugees like a much easier place to disappear or to begin another journey toward a country that might actually grant them asylum. The reasons other refugees chose to return to Sudan, despite the risk of arrest and torture, are much more straightforward: They believe their options are exhausted. They miss their homes. They want to see their families.

Ali has learned to manipulate these fears and emotions. “I say, ‘Welcome to Africa. If you tell me you’re going to pass to Sudan, you come here, you will pass.’ They’re very happy,” he said. Dozens of people have taken Ali up on his offer, he says, at which point Ismail collects their information and money and hands it over to a man named George, the Ugandan minder who picked the new arrivals up at the airport — essentially the Ugandan version of John. Within hours of securing their agreement, George returns with individualized Ugandan travel documents stamped with South Sudanese entry visas.

I asked Ali about the level of government involvement in this scheme. After some prevarication, he conceded that Ugandan officials are not only aware of what is happening, but actively involved in pushing asylum-seekers from Israel into South Sudan. “This is the secret they don’t want to tell,” he said. But aside from the Ugandan travel documents he claims to have seen handed over to the asylum-seekers, he had little evidence to support his claims. That is, except for one additional piece of paper: a permit granting him temporary residence in Uganda.

At the beginning of our conversation, he had showed me a photo of the one-year legal residency permit George had secured for him from Uganda’s Ministry of Internal Affairs. None of the other Sudanese asylum-seekers I met had received anything similar from George, although several said they had asked for one. Ali only received the document, he acknowledged, in exchange for helping Ismail.

Before we parted ways, Ali offered to take me with him when the next group of Sudanese transfers arrived at Forest Cottages. But less than 10 minutes after we left the restaurant, he called to tell me the deal was off. Apparently, he had phoned Ismail immediately after our meeting and had been lamba
          Arriving as a High School Student   
This week I talk with high school senior Eman, who moved to the US less than a year ago. We talk about how she dealt with leaving her friends and family behind in Sudan and again in Egypt, where she lived for five years. She talks about the uncertainty of being at the mercy of […]
          More court challenges expected for Trump’s new travel ban   
An international passenger arrives at Washington Dulles International Airport in Virginia after the Supreme Court granted parts of the Trump administration's emergency request to put its travel ban into effect later in the week pending further judicial review. Photo by James Lawler Duggan/Reuters

An international passenger arrives at Washington Dulles International Airport in Virginia after the Supreme Court granted parts of the Trump administration’s emergency request to put its travel ban into effect later in the week pending further judicial review. Photo by James Lawler Duggan/Reuters

WASHINGTON — A scaled-back version of President Donald Trump’s travel ban is now in force, stripped of provisions that brought protests and chaos at airports worldwide in January yet still likely to generate a new round of court fights.

The new rules, the product of months of legal wrangling, aren’t so much an outright ban as a tightening of already-tough visa policies affecting citizens from six Muslim-majority countries. Refugees are covered, too.

Administration officials promised that implementation this time, which started at 8 p.m. EDT, would be orderly. Customs and Border Protection spokesman Dan Hetlage said his agency expected “business as usual at our ports of entry,” with all valid visa holders still being able to travel.

Still, immigration and refugee advocates are vowing to challenge the new requirements and the administration has struggled to explain how the rules will make the United States safer.

And in Iran, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif denounced the partial reinstatement of the travel ban as a “truly shameful exhibition of blind hostility to all Iranians” — and argued that the measure will prevent Iranian grandmothers from seeing their grandchildren in America.

Zarif, who has persistently assailed the travel ban, wrote on his Twitter account that the “U.S. now bans Iranian grandmothers from seeing their grandchildren, in a truly shameful exhibition of blind hostility to all Iranians.”

Under the temporary rules, citizens of Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya, Iran and Yemen who already have visas will be allowed into the United States. But people from those countries who want new visas will now have to prove a close family relationship or an existing relationship with an entity like a school or business in the U.S.

[READ MORE: Supreme Court partly reinstates Trump’s travel ban]

It’s unclear how significantly the new rules will affect travel. In most of the countries singled out, few people have the means for leisure travel. Those that do already face intensive screenings before being issued visas.

Nevertheless, human rights groups girded for new legal battles. The American Civil Liberties Union, one of the groups challenging the ban, called the new criteria “extremely restrictive,” ”arbitrary” in their exclusions and designed to “disparage and condemn Muslims.”

The state of Hawaii filed an emergency motion Thursday asking a federal judge to clarify that the administration cannot enforce the ban against relatives — such as grandparents, aunts or uncles — not included in the State Department’s definition of “bona fide” personal relationships.

Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer met with customs officials and said he felt things would go smoothly.

“For tonight, I’m anticipating few issues because, I think, there’s better preparation,” he told reporters at Los Angeles International Airport on Thursday night. “The federal government here, I think, has taken steps to avoid the havoc that occurred the last time.”

Much of the confusion in January, when Trump’s first ban took effect, resulted from travelers with previously approved visas being kept off flights or barred entry on arrival in the United States. Immigration officials were instructed Thursday not to block anyone with valid travel documents and otherwise eligible to visit the United States.

Karen Tumlin, legal director of the National Immigration Law Center, said the rules “would slam the door shut on so many who have waited for months or years to be reunited with their families.”

Trump, who made a tough approach to immigration a cornerstone of his election campaign, issued a ban on travelers from the six countries, plus Iraq, shortly after taking office in January. His order also blocked refugees from any country.

Trump said these were temporary measures needed to prevent terrorism until vetting procedures could be reviewed. Opponents noted that visa and refugee vetting were already strict and said there was no evidence that refugees or citizens of those six countries posed a threat. They saw the ban as part of Trump’s campaign promise to bar Muslims from entering the United States.

Lower courts blocked the initial ban and a second, revised Trump order intended to overcome legal hurdles. The Supreme Court on Monday partially reinstated the revised ban but exempted travelers who could prove a “bona fide relationship” with a U.S. person or entity. The court offered only broad guidelines.

[READ MORE: Who’s in and who’s left out as Trump’s travel ban takes effect]

In guidance issued late Wednesday, the State Department said the personal relationships would include a parent, spouse, son, daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling already in the United States. It does not include other relationships such as grandparents, grandchildren, aunts and uncles. On Thursday, the State and Homeland Security departments had both expanded the range of bona fide relationships to include fiancés.

Business or professional links must be “formal, documented and formed in the ordinary course rather than for the purpose of evading” the ban. Journalists, students, workers or lecturers who have valid invitations or employment contracts in the U.S. would be exempt from the ban. The exemption does not apply to those who seek a relationship with an American business or educational institution purely for the purpose of avoiding the rules.

Refugees from any country will face similar requirements. But the U.S. has almost filled its quota of 50,000 refugees for the budget year ending in September and the new rules won’t apply to the few remaining slots. With the Supreme Court set to consider the overall ban in October, the rules could change again.

The travel ban may have the biggest impact on Iranians. In 2015, the most recently available data, nearly 26,000 Iranians were allowed into the United States on visitor or tourist visas. Iranians made up the lion’s share of the roughly 65,000 foreigners from the six countries who visited with temporary, or non-immigrant visas that year.

American journalist Paul Gottinger said he and his Iranian fiancee applied for a visa nearly a year ago but are still waiting on a decision. Gottinger says they were to wed at a Japanese garden in his parents’ home state of Minnesota this month but postponed the ceremony until August because they had not yet received the visa.

Now, he expects they will have to delay again.

“Every twist and turn of the courts, we’re holding our hearts and our stomachs are falling to the floor,” he said by phone from Turkey.

The new regulations are also affecting the wedding plans of Rama Issa-Ibrahim, executive director of the Arab American Association of New York.

She is Syrian-American and had planned to get married this fall. While her father in Syria may be able to get a visa, her aunts and uncles may well be blocked.

“I would love for them to be at this wedding, and unfortunately, they aren’t going to be able to be here,” she said, adding that the ceremony would be postponed.

___

Associated Press writers Amy Taxin and Andrew Dalton in Los Angeles and Michael Noble in New York contributed to this report.

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          S. Sudan national dialogue officials in S. Africa for talks with rebel leader   

June 29, 2017 (JUBA) – The National Dialogue Committee Co-Chairman Angelo Beda, flanked by several senior officials, Wednesday arrived in South Africa to consult with the exiled former First Vice President turned rebel leader, Riek Machar. South Sudan’s rebel leader Riek Machar addresses a press conference in his private residence in Addis Ababa, Saturday, Feb. […]

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          Sudan to remain on U.S. list for state sponsors of terrorism: official   

June 30, 2017 (WASHINGTON) – The United States has no plans to remove Sudan from the list of states that sponsor terrorism, according to a U.S. official. The U.S. State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said that an assessment is underway on Sudan’s compliance with conditions stipulated by the previous administration to permanently lift comprehensive economic […]

The post Sudan to remain on U.S. list for state sponsors of terrorism: official appeared first on Times of News.


          South Sudan and Uganda journalists form network   

June 29, 2017 (KAMPALA) – Journalists from Uganda and South Sudan have formed a network whose main objective is to address the information needs of South Sudanese refugees in Uganda, their host communities and the internally displaced persons in South Sudan. Journalists attend a briefing on new media laws approved by South Sudan’s president, Salva […]

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          Citizens inside Bentiu PoC complain of insecurity   

Citizens in the UN Protection of Civilians’ Site (PoC) in Bentiu town have expressed their concerns about deteriorating security situations. Speaking to Radio Tamazuj yesterday, several displaced persons said they were experiencing harsh conditions due to increasing theft cases since last month. Yohanes Nyang Tab, a displaced person sheltering inside the camp, claimed that an armed […]

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          Cholera death toll in Kapoeta East rises 50: official   

At least 50 people have died since a cholera epidemic broke out in Kapoeta East County in Kapoeta State in April, a local official said. Kapoeta East County Commissioner Jaafer Lowra told Radio Tamazuj on Thursday that the outbreak is still threatening the lives of citizens as it continues to spread across the county, amid shortages […]

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          Wau citizens report insecurity at night   

Citizens in Wau town in South Sudan’s Wau state are still complaining about insecurity in residential areas. Several local residents told Radio Tamazuj yesterday that the security situation is deteriorating in the town, accusing SPLA soldiers of looting civilians’ properties at night. Residents of Al-Jazira and Lokoloko neighbourhoods said the deteriorating security situation started after […]

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          Fuel arrives in Yei after months of acute shortage   

Tankers carrying fuel belonging to state-owned Nile Petroleum Corporation, known as Nilepet, have arrived in Yei after several months of acute fuel shortage that stalled the operations of commercial transport and other motorists in the area. Mohamed Ahmed, managing director of the Rayan fuel station, told Radio Tamazuj that the quantity of fuel is over 30,000 liters to rescue […]

The post Fuel arrives in Yei after months of acute shortage appeared first on Times of News.


          U.S. travel ban set to take effect after top court’s green light   

The State Department guidance on the ban, distributed to all U.S. diplomatic posts and seen by Reuters, defined a close familial relationship as being a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling, including step siblings and other step family relations.   Continued… Article source:http://af.reuters.com/article/sudanNews/idAFL1N1JQ0PF?feedType=RSS&feedName=sudanNews

The post U.S. travel ban set to take effect after top court’s green light appeared first on Times of News.


          U.N. approves drawdown of peacekeepers in Sudan’s Darfur region   

Under the U.N. resolution adopted on Thursday, the troop ceiling will be cut to 11,395 from 15,485 in the first six months and the maximum police level would be reduced to 2,888 from 3,403. The council also asked Guterres and the AU to submit an assessment by Jan. 1, 2018. Article source:http://af.reuters.com/article/sudanNews/idAFL1N1JP1RX?feedType=RSS&feedName=sudanNews

The post U.N. approves drawdown of peacekeepers in Sudan’s Darfur region appeared first on Times of News.


          STATE OF HAWAII ASKS U.S. JUDGE IN HONOLULU TO CLARIFY SUPREME COURT LANGUAGE ON TRUMP TRAVEL BAN-COURT FILING   

STATE OF HAWAII ASKS U.S. JUDGE IN HONOLULU TO CLARIFY SUPREME COURT LANGUAGE ON TRUMP TRAVEL BAN-COURT FILING © Thomson Reuters 2017 All rights reserved Article source:http://af.reuters.com/article/sudanNews/idAFU5N1H600S?feedType=RSS&feedName=sudanNews

The post STATE OF HAWAII ASKS U.S. JUDGE IN HONOLULU TO CLARIFY SUPREME COURT LANGUAGE ON TRUMP TRAVEL BAN-COURT FILING appeared first on Times of News.


          Trumpin maahantulokielto astui voimaan – vastustajat arvostelevat lähisukulaisuuden ahdasta määritelmää   
Syyrialaiset, sudanilaiset, somalialaiset, jemeniläiset, iranilaiset ja libyalaiset eivät voi enää saada viisumia Yhdysvaltoihin ilman läheistä suhdetta Yhdysvaltoihin.
          

10 things you need to know today: June 30, 2017

   

1.

Parts of President Trump's travel ban took effect Thursday evening, tightening already strict visa policies toward travelers from six Muslim-majority nations. The restrictions, slated to last three months, started at 8 p.m. The administration promised an orderly transition, unlike the chaos that erupted at airports when the full policy briefly took effect earlier this year before court challenges blocked it. Customs and Border Protection spokesman Daniel Hetlage predicted "business as usual at our ports of entry." People with valid visas can still travel from the targeted countries — Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya, Iran, and Yemen. Those seeking new visas will have to be able to document that they have a close relative or an existing relationship with a school, business, or other entity in the U.S. Hawaii immediately filed a challenge, asking a court to clarify that relatives not specifically listed by the administration could not be denied entry.

2.

Leading Republican lawmakers denounced President Trump on Thursday for unleashing a harsh personal attack against Morning Joe co-host Mika Brzezinski, tweeting that she had been "bleeding badly from a face-lift" in a recent visit to his Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach. "Obviously, I don't see that as an appropriate comment," House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) said. "What we're trying to do around here is improve the tone and the civility of the debate, and this obviously doesn't help do that." Trump also slammed Brzezinski's co-host and fiance Joe Scarborough, referring to the former Republican congressman as "Psycho Joe" and Brzezinski as "low I.Q. Crazy Mika." White House Principal Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders defended Trump's remarks, noting that when someone criticizes Trump he "fights fire with fire." Brzezinski and Scarborough responded in a Friday Washington Post op-ed, saying that Trump is "not well."

3.

Senate Republicans' proposal to replace ObamaCare would slash Medicaid spending by 35 percent over the next two decades, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said Thursday. The report, requested by Democrats, provided a longer-term forecast of the effects of the bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is working on a revised proposal, hoping to win over some of the at least nine Republicans who opposed the original plan — the GOP can't pass the bill if it loses more than two of the party's 52 senators. The current proposal caps per-person Medicaid spending and phases out ObamaCare's expansion of the program, which provides health coverage for low-income people. As a result, the CBO said, the plan would reduce Medicaid spending from 2 percent of gross domestic product to 1.6 percent in 2036.

4.

Officials in several states on Thursday refused to turn over voter rolls requested in a letter from the vice chairman of President Trump's commission on election integrity, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. In the letter, which was sent to all 50 states Wednesday, Kobach requested information on voters including names, birthdays, and a decade of their voting history. The letter asked for data "publicly available under the laws of your state." Officials from Virginia, California, and Kentucky said they would not comply. "At best this commission was set up as a pretext to validate Donald Trump's alternative election facts, and at worst is a tool to commit large-scale voter suppression," Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) said.

5.

Iraq declared the end of the Islamic State's self-declared caliphate on Thursday, after government forces captured the remains of the historic Al-nuri Mosque in the heart of Mosul, ISIS's de facto capital. The capture of the destroyed 850-year-old mosque and its iconic minaret marked a significant symbolic victory, because that is where the ISIS (also known by its Arabic acronym Daesh) leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared himself ruler of all Muslims. "The return of al-Nuri Mosque and al-Hadba minaret to the fold of the nation marks the end of the Daesh state of falsehood," Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said in a statement. Col. Ryan Dillon, a spokesman of the U.S.-led coalition supporting Iraqi forces, said Mosul's liberation was days away, although the remaining fight would be difficult.

6.

The House of Representatives on Thursday passed two bills that would support President Trump's crackdown on undocumented immigrants. One of the measures, the "No Sanctuary for Criminals Act," seeks to punish so-called sanctuary cities that refuse to help federal authorities deport undocumented immigrants. The other, dubbed "Kate's Law," aims to penalize people who commit crimes after entering the country illegally. The legislation was named for Kathryn Steinle, who was fatally shot in San Francisco two years ago by a repeated felon and undocumented immigrant who had been deported several times. The GOP majority passed the bills largely along party lines. Many Democrats criticized the bills as anti-immigrant. Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) called the second bill "callous and irrational."

7.

The Trump administration on Thursday announced that it was selling $1.42 billion worth of arms to Taiwan. State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the sale shows "support for Taiwan's ability to maintain a sufficient self-defense capability," but does not mean there will be any change in the "one China" policy. The U.S. supports Taiwan, which China still claims as a province, but only officially recognizes China. The package includes technical support for early warning radar, as well as anti-radiation missiles, torpedoes, and missile components. China reacted angrily on Friday, demanding that the U.S. cancel the sale, which it said would pose a threat to China's security and harm Sino-U.S. relations.

8.

German lawmakers voted Friday to legalize gay marriage, bringing the country in line with other leading Western nations. "It's a joyous turning-point," said Volker Beck, who served as a spokesman for the Lesbian and Gay Federation in Germany before entering parliament as a member of the Green Party. "Equality and civil rights have been achieved." Chancellor Angela Merkel paved the way for the snap vote, telling lawmakers in her conservative coalition on Monday that they could vote their conscience. She herself voted no on Friday. The measure, which also allows same-sex couples to adopt, passed 393 to 226 with 4 abstentions. It is expected to face legal challenges. Germany has allowed same-sex civil unions since 2001.

9.

A Republican opposition researcher, Peter W. Smith, told The Wall Street Journal last year that he tried to get copies of emails from Hillary Clinton's server from hackers, including Russians, and he made associates believe he was working with Michael Flynn, who would later briefly serve as President Trump's national security adviser. "He said, 'I'm talking to Michael Flynn about this — if you find anything, can you let me know?'" Eric York, an Atlanta computer-security expert, told the paper. Smith, who was 81, died shortly after talking to the paper. The Journal said it was unclear whether Flynn played any role in the search, and Smith told the paper that he knew Flynn, but did not say Flynn was involved in his work.

10.

Greta Van Susteren is leaving MSNBC just six months after joining the network. "We're kind of in shock," said Van Susteren's agent and husband, John Coale. In a statement, MSNBC said it was "grateful" to have had Van Susteren on air "and we wish her the best." Van Susteren left Fox News, where she'd been for 14 years, last September amid the turbulence that followed the ousting of CEO Roger Ailes; she made her debut on MSNBC in January. Vanity Fair reports Van Susteren's 6 p.m. show, For the Record, "struggled to gain traction." She will be replaced by Ari Melber. Megyn Kelly, who also departed Fox to join MSNBC, has likewise charted rocky ratings since making the switch.


          When disaster strikes, should China do more?   

Sixty-two Chinese rescuers and six sniffer dogs were the first global team on the ground in Nepal the day after a massive earthquake devastated the country just over a year ago.

The quick deployment was a sign of China’s growing role in emergencies, but critics say its humanitarian contributions are still paltry compared to its economic and diplomatic clout. With the world's second-largest economy and largest standing army, China's contributions do not match official pronouncements about its growing international role.

“We are trying to play a bigger role in the existing international order,” Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said at a press conference in March. 

“The world is so big and faces so many problems; the international community wishes to hear China's voices and see China's solutions, and China cannot be absent,” he told reporters.

But the figures belie such statements.

China contributed only $54 million in humanitarian aid in 2014, according to Development Initiatives, which analysed data from sources including the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the UN, and the International Monetary Fund. In contrast, the United States contributed $5.9 billion, while Britain gave $2.3 billion, and Saudi Arabia $755 million. 

The UN’s Financial Tracking Service, which documents global humanitarian aid flows, shows that China’s contribution fell in 2015 to a mere $37 million.

(The above figures are for humanitarian aid only, and do not include grants and loans aimed at development goals.)

Even China’s own statistics underscore the relatively low importance it places on foreign aid.

According to a 2014 white paper on foreign aid – including development as well as humanitarian funding – China’s average ratio of aid budget to gross national income was about 0.07 percent in the period from 2010 to 2012. 

That's much lower than the average 0.3 percent given annually by the 29 countries making up the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee, which include the Group of 7 advanced economies as well as smaller countries including Slovenia, Greece, and the Czech Republic.

In a recent commentary, the UK-based Overseas Development Institute said: “With greater power comes greater responsibility and China should step up its contributions to international humanitarian assistance to an amount at least remotely worthy of its GDP.”

The Ministry of Commerce, which administers Beijing’s humanitarian aid, has not responded to IRIN’s requests for comment and further information.

Politically motivated?

Observers have also noted that China’s aid often seems motivated at least in part by political goals.

“In terms of commitments overseas, it seems highly tactical,” said Kerry Brown, professor of Chinese studies and director of the Lau China Institute at King's College, London.

He cited South Sudan, which gained independence in 2011 from Sudan, a long-time Chinese ally. China suddenly found itself in the awkward position of having invested heavily in oilfields that were now part of an independent South Sudan, while having provided support to the Khartoum government throughout the war, including supplying weapons.

China sent peacekeepers to join the UN mission in South Sudan, and contributed other humanitarian aid.

“We also saw this in Costa Rica in 2007 when China agreed to buy $300 million in bonds and give $130 million in aid to secure Costa Rica’s diplomatic recognition of Beijing instead of Taipei,” Brown said.

Learning curve

Some experts say it will take time for China to build up its humanitarian activities overseas. But as one of the most natural disaster-stricken countries in the world, China has the potential to contribute its considerable experience to disaster relief. 

For example, when the worst earthquake in 30 years struck southwestern Sichuan Province in 2008, international agencies played only a small role and China’s response was widely praised. The government immediately launched a massive effort, which included deploying troops to rescue people buried in rubble, deliver aid and organise evacuations.

But critics also point out that China’s “draconian laws” stymie independent humanitarian efforts from Chinese NGOs.

SEE: Activist arrest puts foreign NGOs in China on edge

“China might be a great power now, but it has to learn how to behave like one, especially in the area of humanitarian aid,” said Xu Guoqi, professor of Chinese history and international relations at the University of Hong Kong.

 

 

Xu said China has very few NGOs relative to its population, and they are still figuring out how to function within China as well as abroad.

A former Chinese NGO worker, who requested anonymity and whose organisation recently shut down after losing access to international donors, told IRIN: “Many Chinese NGOs have relied on foreign funding, as local philanthropy is still underdeveloped. Now that the government is clamping down harder on civil society, NGOs are thinking about how to survive, not how to expand overseas.”

Inequality undermines charity

Despite rapid economic growth, private donations have not yet taken off.

“Even with so many newly rich people, charity-giving is still not widely spread as in many Western countries,” said Xu.

On Weibo, a popular Chinese website similar to Twitter, most discussions of China’s humanitarian aid are critical of the leadership for giving money to other countries when commenters felt the funds should be used assisting its own citizens.

China's income inequality is among the world's worst. The country's Gini coefficient for income was 0.49 in 2012, according to a recent Peking University report, where a number above 0.40 represents severe income inequality.

“Some members of the public will think, 'there are so many poor areas of China – why should [Chinese] give foreign aid?' But this is changing,” a staff member of the China Foundation for Poverty Alleviation told IRIN. 

Since 2003, this Beijing-based NGO, which enjoys government support, has carried out disaster relief operations in countries including Indonesia, Haiti, the US, Myanmar, Nepal, and Ecuador with expenditure totaling around $13.7 million.

The CFPA staffer said the idea of charity could be catching on, judging by recent fundraising efforts.

“For example, many individuals gave contributions of more than 1,000 yuan ($150) for Nepal earthquake relief, and within 24 hours of fundraising to fight against the Ebola virus we raised 1.21 million yuan ($182,747) from the public,” she said.

(With additional reporting by Jennifer Rigby in Nepal)

jc/jf/bp/ag

Workers and residents watch as a bulldozer demolishes an earthquake-damaged building in the city center in Chautara, Nepal, on 8 July 2015 Analysis Aid and Policy Environment and Disasters Politics and Economics When disaster strikes, should China do more? Joanna Chiu IRIN BEIJING South Sudan Asia China Nepal Costa Rica
          South Sudan government won’t allow aid workers into rebel-held areas   
South Sudan's government says it may withhold permission for aid workers to go to some rebel-held areas on security grounds, the president's spokesman said on Thursday, after the U.N. complained aid convoys were being blocked.
          PAJALEPAPAJALEPAPAJALEPAPAJALE   
Capítulo 2 said...
Pichi de diablo se seca su hocico con la punta del mantel.
- Ahhhhhhhh. Ta mare Banana, no hables así, creeran que somos huevones. Somos poetas!!!!!!
Pezuña brava y Gato sucio dudan acercarse a la mesa. Gato sucio fastidiado
- Allí no, Pezuña, no me cae Verastegui.
- Que pasa Peruuuuuuu. El zambo es la voz.
- Si no te sientas conmigo nadie te invita las chelas.
Mientras tanto, Verastegui en su letanía.
- Pajelepa Pajalepa Pajalepa
Banana Joe y Pichi de diablo regalándose codazos por la atención de J. Pimentel.
- El poeta debe vivir mucho.
Banana Joe y Pichi de diablo
- Síiiiiiiiii señor
Pezuña brava se acerca al grupo. Mira a Banana.
- Banana, ponte una carapulca con pescado frito, ¿quieres?
En medio del bar Gato sucio, solito, nadie lo saluda. Chasquea los dedos. Banana Joe atiende el llamado sin antes pagar por la carapulca con pescado frito. Pezuña brava feliz.
- A comerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
Pichi de diablo no ha almorzado en dos días, la lengua colgando por el potaje. Extiende la mano por un ojito del bonito. Pezuña brava le llama la atención.
- Después, Pichi, después. Te dejaré un poco.
- Tengo hambre pe.
Banana Joe cuadrándose ante Gato sucio.
- Mi camarada. A sus órdenes.
Gato sucio sonriente. “Ese es mi Banana, carajo”
- Banana, ves lo que estoy viendo?
Gato sucio señala el moral abierto de Verástegui. Un manuscrito anillado. El zambo en su letanía, fuera del mundo.
- Pajalepa pajalepa pajalepa.
Pichi de diablo confundido, busca respuestas en J Pimentel.
- Maese, una preguntita, ¿ soy feo? La verdad pe.
J Pimentel se apiada de Pichi de diablo.
- Pichi, no eres feo, te contaré la historia del patito feo.
Pichi de diablo atento.
Mientras, Gato sucio y Banana Joe traman.
- Banana, tienes que traerme ese manuscrito.
Banana Joe.
- ¿Y si me chapan?
Gato sucio
- Tendrás que correr. Te espero en la Colmena en un taxi, de allí nos vamos al aeropuerto y volamos a Boston. Nunca sabran que fuimos nosotros.
Banana Joe
- ¿Y en Boston podre escribir poesia?
Gato sucio
- No solo eso, publicar también.
Banana Joe
- Recorcholis!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Pichi de diablo llorando por la historia del patito feo.
- Soy un cisne. Snif, snif
Gato sucio se retira del Queirolo. Banana Joe en la barra. “Soy un pendejo”, piensa. Alza la voz.
- Poetas del Peru, vates del universo, vengan a la barra, invito pisco a todos, vengan, vengan.
Pichi de diablo es el primero en lanzarse sobre las copas, Pezuña brava llevando su plato de carapulca, todo los poetas del Peru luchando por sus copitas de pisco, todos menos Verastegui.
- Pajalepa pajalepa pajalepa
Banana Joe se acerca donde el Zambo, Se agacha y abre despacio el morral, retira el manuscrito, lo abraza, camina hacia la puerta. Pero J Pimentel lo observa.
- Túuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu. ¿Qué llevas en la panza? Contesta puerco.
Banaja Joe
- ¿Yo? Nada
Los Pajalepas del Zambo se distorsionan.
- Jorge, no siento la fuerza. Jorge, algo me falta.
Señala a Banana Joe.
- Tú tienes mi manuscrito puerco.
J Pimentel
- Poetas del Perú, agarren a ese jijona.
Banana Joe
- Recorcholis!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Mejor me la pico
Pichi de diablo
- Oe Banana, no te vayas pe, Banana, Banana, Banana
Banana Joe corriendo por Quilca. Gato sucio espera a su discipulo en un taxi rojo.
J Pimentel en la calle
- Agarren a ese jijuna!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Pichi de diablo
- Yo lo voy a agarrar.
Pichi de diablo capitanea la maratón. Detrás de él todos los poetas del Perú.
Machín Ybarra
- Agarren a ese turiferario, ganapan, monoselfutunirico.
Impotencia Zelada
- Te voy a matar Banana
Draculin de Trilce
- Voy a sacarte la mierda Banana
Pichi de diablo
- Draculin por que corres?
Draculin de Trilce
- J Pimentel ordeno correr y obedezco
Pichi de diablo a poco de alcanzar a Banana.
Gato sucio preocupado
- Corre Banana corre corre Banana
Banaja Joe sudando, siente los dedos de Pichi de diablo rozando su potito.
Gato sucio
- Vuela Banana, vuela Banana, vuelaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
Banana Joe
- Pajalepa pajalepa pajalepa pajale pajalepa
Banaja Joe se eleva, vuela, todos los poetas del Peru paralizados, un chancho volador, un chancho volador
Banana Joe
- Pajalepa pajalepa pajalepa pajalepa
Banana Joe y Gato sucio desaparecen con el manuscrito del Zambo
En la esquina de Quilca y Caylloma, J Pimentel, Verástegui y Pezuña brava, con su plato de carapulca.
Verastegui
- Pajalepa
J Pimentel
- Pajalepa
Pezuña brava
- Paja, ahum, lepa, pajalepa
Es una noche triste para la poesia peruana. Los corazones rotos, la vida no vale nada. Le han robado a Verástegui.
Pichi de diablo
- Ta mare, eso no se le hace a un poeta pe.




          Sanctions deadline: U.S. criticizes Sudan’s human rights records   
The United States said on Friday it was “very concerned” about Sudan’s human rights record, which was supposed to have improved by early July in order for Washington to lift sanctions against the country. In January, the outgoing Obama administration gave Sudan 180 days to improve its record and resolve its political and military conflicts […]
          Sudan faces FIFA ban over government interference   
FIFA has warned Sudan that it faces an international ban from football unless it overturns a governmental order to install a new football association president. The ban is set to begin on 1 July after two rival group claimed control of the country’s association. On 2 June, Sudan’s Ministry of Justice ordered the FIFA-recognised SFA […]
          As South Sudan's civil war rages, cholera takes deadly toll   

Clasping frail arms around his stomach, Machar Weituor doubles over in pain as he slowly positions himself over the hole in his bed. Too feeble to make it to the toilet, the 40-year-old groans faintly as he defecates into a bucket.


          Daily One Liner Current Affairs Update - 28-29 June, 2017   

Hello and welcome to exampundit. Firstly, we loved how you guys appreciated current affairs at a glance(formerly) since its inception. Way back in 1st January, 2016, we launched this and it was highly appreciated. 


Earlier we used to update the daily one liner current affairs along with the Daily Current Affairs Updates. However, due to its popularity & quality, we have decided to post One Liner Current Affairs Update separately on a regular basis. We are starting off with the updates of 28 and 29 June, 2017 just to give you a demo.


Banking & Financial Updates
  • The Maharashtra government issued the Government Resolution (GR) on 28 June 2017 for the farm loan waiver of Rs 34022 crore announced by Chief Minister Devendra  Fadnavis last week.
  • India on 27 June 2017 made voluntary contribution of USD 100000 to the United Nations Trust Fund for International Cooperation in Tax Matters (UN Tax Fund).
  • The Union Government on 28 June 2017 simultaneously launched two key interventions: a revamped oil and gas bidding mechanism named Open Acreage Licensing Process (OALP) and the National Data Repository (NDR) for the first major oil field auctions to be held from 1 July 2017.
  • India on 27 June 2017 signed a loan agreement of USD 35 million with the World Bank for Assam State Public Financial Institutional Reforms Project.


India & States Updates
  • The Union Cabinet, presided by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, on 28 June 2017 approved signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between India and Israel on National Campaign for Water Conservation in India.
  • Prime Minister Narendra Modi on 29 June 2017 inaugurated the centenary celebrations of Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. In addition, PM Modi also released the coin and postal stamp in the honour of Jain saint and philosopher Shrimad Rajchandra on his 150th birth anniversary at Abhay Ghat.
  • The Election Commission of India (ECI) on 28 June 2017 announced that it will launch a special drive to enrol left out electors, with a special focus on first time electors. The step is taken in the direction of Commission’s motto that 'No Voter to be Left Behind’. It is the first time that Facebook'svoter registration reminder has been rolled out across India.
  • India's latest communication satellite GSAT-17 was successfully launched from Kourou in French Guiana on 29 June 2017. The satellite was launched by French rocket Ariane-5.
  • India and the Netherlandson 27 June 2017 released a Joint Communiqué at The Hague. The Joint Communique was released after bilateral talks between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Dutch counterpart, Prime Minister Mark Rutte.
  • The Indian Army reportedly received its first batch of bullet-proof helmets from Kanpur-based MKU Industries.
  • Operations at one of three terminals at India's largest container port Jawaharlal Nehru Port (JNPT) in Mumbai were disrupted by the global ransomware attack. The attack was confirmed by the port authorities on 28 June 2017.





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Appointments
  • Rajiv Kumar was on 29 June 2017 appointed as the Chief Secretary of Uttar Pradesh.
  • Dr. Manoj Soni, former Vice Chancellor of Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Open University, took the Oath of Office and Secrecy as Member of the Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) on 28 June 2017 at Delhi.
  • Indian-American Krishna R Urs was on 28 June 2017 appointed as the United States (US) Ambassador to Peru by the President Donald Trump administration.
  • Jammu and Kashmir Governor Narinder Nath Vohra in the last week of June 2017 was appointed the President of the India International Centre (IIC).
  • Loknath Behra was on 28 June 2017 appointed as the Director General of Police (DGP) of Kerala as incumbent TP Senkumar will retire as the state DGP on 30 June 2017.
  • Former Chief Economic Advisor Kaushik Basu on 27 June 2017 took over as the President of the International Economic Association (IEA) with effect from 23 June 2017.


Days & Observances
  • The International Day of the Tropics 2017 was observed across the world on 29 June 2017.
  • Sharjah, a city in the United Arab Emirates has been named as 'the World Book Capital' for 2019 by the Director-General of UNESCO, Irina Bokova for the quality of its literary and cultural activities and for its efforts to make books accessible to the entire population of the nation. The programme runs with a slogan ‘Read - you are in Sharjah’.


World News Updates
  • The Trump administration has set new criteria for visa applicants from six Muslim nations and all refugees that require a close family or business tie to the United States. According to the new guidelines sent to all the US embassies and consulates on 28 June 2017, visa applicants from six countries- Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen-must prove a relationship with a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling in the United States in order to get a go ahead.
  • The Automated Teller Machine (ATM) marked its 50th anniversary on 27 June 2017. The first ATM was opened on 27 June 1967 at a branch of Barclays bank in Enfield, north London, the first of six cash dispensers commissioned by the bank.
  • The words Chana and Chana Dal were on 27 June 2017 added to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). 'Chana' means Chickpeas and 'Chana Dal' stands for split chickpea lentils.


Sports Updates
  • Indian badminton player Kidambi Srikanth has re-entered the top ten of the Badminton World Federation (BWF) men's singles rankings for the first time in ten months.
  • Sri Lankan fast bowler, Lasith Malinga has been handed over a suspension ban of six months after a disciplinary inquiry found him guilty of breaching his contract by speaking to the media without permission.
  • Swiss legend Roger Federer on 25 June 2017 defeated Alexander Zverev 6-1, 6-3 in the final to clinch the 2017 Halle Open Men’s Singles title.


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          Current Affairs Update – 28-29 June, 2017   

Hello and welcome to exampundit. Here are the Important Current Affairs of 28 & 29 June, 2017. These are important for the upcoming IBPS RRB OS-I, Office Assistant, IBPS PO, Dena Bank PGDBF, NABARD Grade A Recruitment Exam 2017.


Banking & Financial News

Maharashtra Government issued government resolution on loan waiver


  • The Maharashtra government issued the Government Resolution (GR) on 28 June 2017 for the farm loan waiver of Rs 34022 crore announced by Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis last week.
  • The resolution said, loans of all indebted farmers whose accounts went into default until 30 June 2016, will be waived off with a cap of Rs 1.5 lakh per farmer.
  • It said, the farmers who have paid off their outstanding loans after 30 June 2016, will get a blanket help of Rs 25000 from the state government. The GR said, the farmers are entitled to get the benefit only once.
  • Persons with an annual turnover of over Rs 10 lakh and those who are registered under VAT or Service Tax will be ineligible for loan waiver. Retired persons excluding ex-servicemen whose monthly pension is Rs 15000 or more are also not eligible.
  • The GR says that the farmers, who have more than Rs 1.5 lakh debt, will get the benefit of loan waiver after they pay their remaining amount of debt along with interest. It also says that woman farmer would be given priority in this scheme.

India makes voluntary contribution of USD 100000 to United Nations Tax Fund


  • India on 27 June 2017 made voluntary contribution of USD 100000 to the United Nations Trust Fund for International Cooperation in Tax Matters (UN Tax Fund).
  • This voluntary contribution will be dedicated towards ensuring greater support for developing country participation in the subcommittee meetings of the UN Tax Committee which are currently unfunded.
  • By handing over the cheque to the UN Tax Trust Fund, Indian Government is hopeful that more developing countries will contribute towards the fund. This move is also expected to ensure that global tax cooperation norms and rules will work more effectively and efficiently for all countries and all stakeholders.
  • Voluntary contributions for the Trust Fund have been called for by the UN Tax Committee since its establishment in 2006. The call for contributions was also emphasized in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda adopted at the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in 2015.

Union Government launched new bidding mechanism for mega oil and gas auctions


  • The Union Government on 28 June 2017 simultaneously launched two key interventions: a revamped oil and gas bidding mechanism named Open Acreage Licensing Process (OALP) and the National Data Repository (NDR) for the first major oil field auctions to be held from 1 July 2017.
  • The auctions will be held under a new Hydrocarbon Exploration Licensing Policy (HELP).
  • Arun Jaitely, Union Finance Minister, and Dharmendra Pradhan, Union Petroleum Minister, launched both the initiatives in a mega event in New Delhi.
  • The new bidding mechanism will allow interested firms to bid for blocks of their choice at any time of the year with the help of National Data Repository.
  • The NDR is a comprehensive database of India’s key sedimentary basins that will provide the bidders data on contract areas that will be available for auctioning.
  • Under the mechanism, an investor will be allowed to put forth an Expression of Interest for undertaking contracts under Petroleum Operations Contract (POC) or Reconnaissance Contract (RC).
  • The investor will have the liberty to apply for such contracts bi-annually. They may also participate in rounds of auctions conducted by the regulator DGH over and above the applications made under OALP.

India, World Bank sign USD 35 million agreement to enhance efficiency in tax administration in Assam


  • India on 27 June 2017 signed a loan agreement of USD 35 million with the World Bank for Assam State Public Financial Institutional Reforms Project.
  • The loan will be provided by the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), an international financial institution under World Bank that offers loans to middle-income developing countries.
  • The agreement was signed by Raj Kumar, Joint Secretary under Department of Economic Affairs and John Blomquist, Acting Country Director of World Bank (India). The Implementing Entity Agreement was signed by Additional Chief Secretary (Finance) of Assam's Department of Finance and John Blomquist.
  • The objective of the project is to improve predictability and transparency in budget execution and efficiency in tax administration in Assam.
  • The project will benefit the citizens of Assam through efficient processes, enhanced transparency and better service delivery such as electronic payments and collections for services.
  • It will also lead to better public procurement and enhanced taxpayer services provided by public institutions.
  • The total project cost is USD 44 million, out of which USD 35 million will be financed by the World Bank. The remaining amount will be funded out of the State Budget.
  • The project duration is of 5 years.

6th Joint Trade Committee was convened between India and Myanmar


  • The 6th India-Myanmar Joint Trade Committee (JTC) Meeting was held on 27 June 2017 at New Delhi. The meeting was co-chaired by Nirmala Sitharaman, Minister of Commerce & Industry from India and Dr. Than Myint, Union Commerce Minister from Myanmar. The Joint Trade Committee plays a key role in facilitating issues related to the enhancement of the bilateral economic partnership between the two countries.
Speaking on the occasion, Sitharaman stated that both the countries have a long history of shared religious, linguistic and ethnic ties:
  • - Myanmar is India’s gateway to South East Asia and ASEAN with which India is seeking greater economic integration through ‘Act East’ Policy.
  • - Myanmar shares a long land border of over 1600 Kms with India as well as a maritime boundary in the Bay of Bengal.
  • - The bilateral relationship between the two countries has been further strengthened by the high-level exchanges.
  • - Prime Minister of India visited Myanmar in November 2014 for the Twelfth India-ASEAN Summit while the state counsellor of Myanmar visited India in October 2016.



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India's policy panel proposes to break up of Coal India into 7 firms


  • A new draft of a New Energy Policy (NEP) prepared by Union Government's policy think-tank, NITI Aayog, says that India should split the seven units of state-controlled Coal India Limited (CIL) into independent companies. This action will help the firm to be more competitive.
  • About 70 percent of India's power generation is fired by coal. The country is the world's third-largest producer and third-biggest importer of coal, which the government wants to change by boosting local coal production.
  • Fresh coal production should come from private sector mines, the government think-tank NITI Aayog said, adding that the move called for reforms in allocating coal blocks to independent companies specialised in coal mining.
  • The previous report of December 2016 by Reuters said that senior Indian government officials, tasked by Prime Minister Narendra Modi with reviewing energy security, were recommending the breakup of the world's largest coal miner within a year.
  • Attempts to break up the world's biggest coal miner could expect resistance from powerful unions representing the firm's more than 350000 employees. The government backed down from a similar proposal in the face of union protests in 2014.
  • One of the unions, which is close to Prime Minister Narendra Modi's party, is against the move and says it, has the support of about half of Coal India's workers.
  • According to reports, Baij Nath Rai, president of Bharatiya Mazdoor Sangh in its conversation with Reuters said, “We are opposing the recommendations made by NITI Aayog".

News related to India and states

Union Cabinet approves MoU between India and Israel on National Campaign for Water Conservation


  • The Union Cabinet, presided by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, on 28 June 2017 approved signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between India and Israel on National Campaign for Water Conservation in India.
  • The MoU will help India in conserving water for future generations.
  • As per the agreement, the two nations will work to enhance cooperation at the national, regional and international level to design, implement and monitor a professionally-designed National Water Conservation campaign in India.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi inaugurates Centenary Celebrations of Sabarmati Ashram


  • Prime Minister Narendra Modi on 29 June 2017 inaugurated the centenary celebrations of Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad, Gujarat.
  • In addition, PM Modi also released the coin and postal stamp in the honour of Jain saint and philosopher Shrimad Rajchandra on his 150th birth anniversary at Abhay Ghat.
  • Shrimad Rajchandra was a Jain poet, philosopher, scholar and reformer.

Election Commission to launch nationwide Voter Registration Reminder on Facebook


  • The Election Commission of India (ECI) on 28 June 2017 announced that it will launch a special drive to enrol left out electors, with a special focus on first time electors.
  • The step is taken in the direction of Commission’s motto that 'No Voter to be Left Behind’.
  • It is the first time that Facebook's voter registration reminder has been rolled out across India. The drive will be launched on 1 July 2017.
  •  In order to reach out to maximum eligible voters, the ECI is collaborating with Facebook to launch first nationwide Voter Registration Reminder. 
  • With over 180 million people in India on Facebook, the Register Now button is designed to encourage Indian citizens to register themselves with the Election Commission of India.
  • On 1 July 2017, a notification of the Voter Registration Reminder will be sent to people on Facebook in India who are eligible to vote.

India's communication satellite GSAT-17 successfully launched


  • India's latest communication satellite GSAT-17 was successfully launched from Kourou in French Guiana on 29 June 2017. The satellite was launched by French rocket Ariane-5. The European launcher Arianespace Flight VA238 blasted off from Ariane Launch Complex No 3 (ELA 3) at Kourou, a French territory located in the northeastern coast of South America, a couple of minutes delayed than the scheduled time of 2:29 hrs India time.
  • After its lift-off at 2:45 am (IST) and a flight lasting about 39 minutes, GSAT-17 separated from the Ariane 5 upper stage in an elliptical Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) with a perigee (nearest point to Earth) of 249 km and an apogee (farthest point to Earth) of 35920 km, inclined at an angle of 3 degrees to the equator.
  • GSAT-17 with a lift-off mass of about 3477 kg carries payloads in Normal C-band, Extended C-band and S-band to provide various communication services. GSAT-17 has a life expectancy of 15 years.
  • The Satellite also carries equipment for meteorological data relay and satellite-based search and rescue services being provided by earlier INSAT satellites.

India-Netherlands Joint Communique issued during PM Modi’s visit


  • India and the Netherlands on 27 June 2017 released a Joint Communiqué at The Hague. The Joint Communique was released after bilateral talks between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Dutch counterpart, Prime Minister Mark Rutte.
  • The communiqué was released during Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s working visit to the Netherlands on 27 June 2017. Modi was on a visit to the Netherlands at the invitation of his Dutch counterpart. His visit to the nation also marked 70 years of the establishment of diplomatic relations between India and the Netherlands.
  • During this visit, Modi met with his counterpart Mark Rutte, His Majesty King Willem-Alexander and Her Majesty Queen Maxima. In addition, Prime Minister Modi also met with representatives of Dutch companies operating in the Indian market and those who are keen to invest there.
  • Earlier on his arrival, the Prime Minister was welcomed at Schiphol Airport by Minister of Foreign Affairs Bert Koenders.

Indian Army gets first batch of modern bullet-proof helmets


  • The Indian Army reportedly received its first batch of bullet-proof helmets from Kanpur-based MKU Industries.
  • The MKU Industries, which supplies military equipment to the United Nations and NATO, was awarded a contract to manufacture 1.58 lakh helmets at the cost of Rs 180 crore.
  • Indian Army has ordered the bolted version of bolt-free ballistic helmets. Bolt-free is a higher and expensive version of bullet-proof helmets, which gives all-round protection from head injuries.
  • The MKU Industries claims that the bullet-proof helmets go through rigorous quality tests and ballistic lab test conducted at its testing facilities in India as well as in Germany.
  • The helmets are reportedly designed to bear the impact of 9 mm ammunition fired from a short range.
  • They match global standards of equipment for armed forces.
  • The bullet-proof helmet has the main protective layer of Kevlar, which has high tensile strength-to-weight ratio; by this measure it is 5 times stronger than steel.

JNPT, India's largest container port, hit by cyber attack


  • Operations at one of three terminals at India's largest container port Jawaharlal Nehru Port (JNPT) in Mumbai were disrupted by the global ransomware attack. The attack was confirmed by the port authorities on 28 June 2017.
  • The impacted terminal is operated by Danish shipping giant AP Moller-Maersk. The Maersk group confirmed individually on 27 June that its operations were hit by a cyber attack named Petya that affected its multiple sites and select business units.
  • The group’s statement read, “We are responding to the situation to contain and limit the impact and uphold operations."
  • Anil Diggikar, JNPT chairman also stated that the port has been trying to clear containers manually but its operating capacity has dropped to a third at the terminal.
  • “This is a fallout of global cyber attack. Containers are piling up outside the port due to delay in loading and unloading at Gateway Terminals India,” Diggikar said and added that they are hopeful that the operations would normalise in a day.
  • AP Moller-Maersk operates the Gateway Terminals India (GTI) at JNPT, which has a capacity to handle 1.8 million standard container units.


Appointments

Rajiv Kumar appointed as Chief Secretary of Uttar Pradesh


  • Rajiv Kumar was on 29 June 2017 appointed as the Chief Secretary of Uttar Pradesh. His appointment was approved by the Uttar Pradesh Government.
  • Prior to this appointment, Kumar was a Secretary in the Union Shipping ministry. He is a 1981 batch IAS Officer of the Uttar Pradesh cadre.
  • Kumar succeeds Rahul Prasad Bhatnagar, who was appointed by the previous Samajwadi Party (SP) government and continued to serve in the office for three months under the Yogi Adityanath government.
  • Rahul Prasad Bhatnagar, the outgoing Chief Secretary, will now serve as the Chairman of the Greater Noida Authority and also as the Investment Commissioner of Uttar Pradesh in New Delhi.

Former Vice Chancellor of Ambedkar University takes oath as UPSC Member


  • Dr. Manoj Soni, former Vice Chancellor of Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Open University, took the Oath of Office and Secrecy as Member of the Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) on 28 June 2017 at Delhi.
  • The Oath was administered by the UPSC Chairman David R Syiemlieh. UPSC conducts recruitment exams to select country’s top bureaucrats.

Indian-American Krishna R Urs appointed as US Ambassador to Peru


  • Indian-American Krishna R Urs was on 28 June 2017 appointed as the United States (US) Ambassador to Peru by the President Donald Trump administration.
  • Krishna is currently serving as the Charge d' Affaires of the US Embassy in Madrid, Spain, where he was also the Deputy Chief of Mission. He has been a career service American diplomat since 1986.
  • During three decades of State Department service, Urs has specialised in economic issues and developed extensive policy experience in the Andean region of South America.

Narinder Nath Vohra appointed as President of India International Centre


  • Jammu and Kashmir Governor Narinder Nath Vohra in the last week of June 2017 was appointed the President of the India International Centre (IIC).
  • Vohra was appointed as the president at the Annual General Meeting, which was held on 23 June 2017.
  • The appointment was made after eminent jurist Soli Sorabjee quit the presidential post.
He is the first civilian Governor of Jammu and Kashmir in 18 years after Jagmohan.

Loknath Behra appointed as DGP of Kerala


  • Loknath Behra was on 28 June 2017 appointed as the Director General of Police (DGP) of Kerala as incumbent TP Senkumar will retire as the state DGP on 30 June 2017.
  • Behra's appointment as state police chief was confirmed by the Pinarayi Vijayan-led Kerala government after the cabinet meeting.
  • Behra is currently serving as the Director of Vigilance and Anti-Corruption Bureau. He is a 1985 batch Kerala cadre IPS officer.

Kaushik Basu takes over as President of International Economic Association


  • Former Chief Economic Advisor Kaushik Basu on 27 June 2017 took over as the President of the International Economic Association (IEA) with effect from 23 June 2017. He will serve the office for three years.
  • The IEA is a leading organisation for professional economists that seeks to shape global economic policy and research. Among IEA's past presidents are Nobel laureates Kenneth Arrow, Robert Solow, Amartya Sen and Joseph Stiglitz.

Days

International Day of the Tropics 2017 observed globally


  • The International Day of the Tropics 2017 was observed across the world on 29 June 2017 with an aim to raise awareness to the specific challenges faced by tropical areas and the far-reaching implications of the issues affecting the world’s tropical zone.
  • The International Day of the Tropics celebrates the diversity of the tropics and provides an opportunity to share tropical stories and expertise and to acknowledge the diversity and potential of the region.
  • The day was proclaimed on 14 June 2016 by the resolution of United Nations General Assembly to mark the anniversary of the 'State of the Tropics Report' that was launched by Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi on 29 June 2014.

Sharjah named World Book Capital 2019 by UNESCO


  • Sharjah, a city in the United Arab Emirates has been named as 'the World Book Capital' for 2019 by the Director-General of UNESCO, Irina Bokova for the quality of its literary and cultural activities and for its efforts to make books accessible to the entire population of the nation.
  • Bokova took the decision on the recommendation of the Advisory Committee that met at the Headquarters of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) at La Haye.
  • The programme runs with a slogan ‘Read - you are in Sharjah’.
  • It focuses on six themes: inclusivity, reading, heritage, outreach, publishing and children.
  • It would include a conference on freedom of speech, a contest for young poets, workshops for creating Braille books and tactile books as well as many other events for Sharjah's multi-ethnic population.

World News

Trump’s travel ban: Visa applicants from these 6 Muslim nations require close family ties in US


  • The Trump administration has set new criteria for visa applicants from six Muslim nations and all refugees that require a close family or business tie to the United States.
  • According to the new guidelines sent to all the US embassies and consulates on 28 June 2017, visa applicants from six countries- Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen-must prove a relationship with a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling in the United States in order to get a go ahead.
  • The new guideless have been set by the State Department, according to which extended family members including grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law and fiancées are not considered to be close relationships.
  • These new measures are expected to be implemented from 29 June 2017.
  • The court’s opinion exempts applicants from the ban if they can prove a “bona fide relationship” with a US person or entity. However, it is up to the government lawyers to determine how to define such a relationship. The court offered only broad guidelines suggesting it would include a relative, job offer or invitation to lecture in the US.
  • The move comes after the Supreme Court partially restored President Donald Trump's executive order that was widely criticised as a ban on Muslims.

World's first ATM celebrates its 50th birthday


  • The Automated Teller Machine (ATM) marked its 50th anniversary on 27 June 2017.
  • The first ATM was opened on 27 June 1967 at a branch of Barclays bank in Enfield, north London, the first of six cash dispensers commissioned by the bank.
  • To celebrate the occasion, the British bank decorated the site of the world's first cashpoint in gold. A black-and-white picture of Varney using the ATM hangs above it, while a commemorative gold plaque has been placed on the bank wall.
  • The original cash machine was the brainchild of Scottish inventor John Shepherd-Barron, who was commissioned by the bank to create six cash dispensers, which based on vending machines.
  • The first person to use the inaugural ATM was actor Reg Varney, the star of a popular British TV comedy called "On The Buses."
  • Transactions were initiated by inserting paper cheques issued by a teller or cashier, marked with carbon-14 for machine readability and security.


Chinese Navy launches biggest new generation destroyer


  • China’s Navy on 28 June 2017 launched its biggest new generation destroyer that weighs around 10,000 tonnes at the Jiangnan Shipyard (Group) in Shanghai. The launch is a part of the country’s massive expansion effort to become a global naval power.
  • The new destroyer, which is a domestically designed and produced vessel, is the first of China’s new generation of destroyers.
  • The destroyer is equipped with new air defence, anti-missile, anti-ship and anti-submarine weapons.
  • The ship is believed to be the first Type 055 destroyer, which is considered to be a successor class to the country’s smaller Type 052D guided missile destroyers.
  • The vessel will have to undergo planned testing including equipment operation, berthing and sailing before it is commissioned into use.

Chana and Chana Dal words added to Oxford English Dictionary


  • The words Chana and Chana Dal were on 27 June 2017 added to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). 'Chana' means Chickpeas and 'Chana Dal' stands for split chickpea lentils.
  • With this, these Indian food essentials Chickpeas (chana) and the split chickpea lentils (chana dal) join the vast list of more than 600 other words and phrases that have been included in its quarterly update of the Oxford English Dictionary.
  • The other prominent new entries in the OED include a batch of tennis-related words like "Forced Error".
  • A slang 'Bagel' has also been added which refers to a score in a set of six games to love, as there is similarity of the numeral zero to the shape of a bagel.
  • A new sense of 'woke', which was shortlisted for 'Word of the Year', has also been added. It means alert to racial or social discrimination and injustice.

US adds China to the list of Worst Human Trafficking Offenders


  • The United States State Department in the last week of June 2017 issued highly public criticism of China in its latest annual report on the global state of human trafficking.
  • As per the Trafficking in Persons report, China is among the worst offenders of human trafficking.
  • China is now grouped with Tier 3 offenders such as Syria, Iran, Russia and North Korea.
  • China was downgraded to Tier 3 status in 2017 Trafficking in Persons (TIP) in part because it has not taken serious steps to end its own complicity in trafficking, including forced labours from North Korea that are located in China.
  • Several other countries like the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea and Mali were downgraded to Tier 3 status.

Sports News

Kidambi Srikanth re-enters top 10 of BWF men’s rankings


  • Indian badminton player Kidambi Srikanth has re-entered the top ten of the Badminton World Federation (BWF) men's singles rankings for the first time in ten months.
  • The rankings, which were released on 29 June 2017, saw Srikanth placed at the 8th position with 58,583 points. The development comes less than a week after the ace shuttler beat Olympic champion Chen Long in straight games 22-20, 21-6 to claim the Australian Open Super Series and before that Japan's Kazumasa Sakai to clinch the Indonesian Open.
  • Srikanth is the lone Indian shuttler to figure in the top-10 of men's singles ranking after climbing up three places.
  • The 24-year-old had last reached the top ten in October 2016, few months after he reached the quarter-finals at the Rio Olympics 2016.

Lasith Malinga gets one-year ban, fined for media remarks


  • Sri Lankan fast bowler, Lasith Malinga has been handed over a suspension ban of six months after a disciplinary inquiry found him guilty of breaching his contract by speaking to the media without permission.
  • Malinga will also be fined 50 percent of the match fee from his next one-day international. He will be facing a disciplinary inquiry over his comments about Sri Lanka's Sports Minister Dayasiri Jayasekara. 

Roger Federer defeats Alexander Zverev to lift ninth Halle Open title

  • Swiss legend Roger Federer on 25 June 2017 defeated Alexander Zverev 6-1, 6-3 in the final to clinch the 2017 Halle Open Men’s Singles title.
  • The final took place at the Gerry Weber Stadion in Halle, Germany.
  • He also won the Olympic gold medal in doubles with his compatriot Stan Wawrinka at the 2008 Summer Olympic Games and the Olympic silver medal in singles at the 2012 Summer Olympic Games.
  • He is currently ranked world No. 5 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP).












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          Sudan hopes U.S. travel ban won't affect sanctions lifting -official   
KHARTOUM, June 27 (Reuters) - Sudan hopes the revival of President Donald Trump's travel ban on its citizens and those of five other Muslim-majority states will not affect the planned lifting of U.S. economic sanctions next month, a Foreign Ministry official said on Tuesday. The U.S. Supreme ...
          Muslim ban, Nasce l’Alleanza del pacifico, G20 Amburgo, May ottiene la fiducia, Italia-Ue e il problema dei migranti   

Usa, torna in vigore tra le polemiche il bando temporaneo agli ingressi 30 giu 10:56 – (Agenzia Nova) – E’ tornato in vigore ieri negli Usa il bando temporaneo imposto dall’amministrazione presidenziale Trump agli ingressi da sei paesi a maggioranza musulmana – Siria, Sudan, Somalia, Libia, Iran e Yemen – ritenuti un rischio per la […]

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          A brief history of climate change and conflict   
This is a very important and timely article from the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists.

I would encourage people to read and study this article carefully.

Rita


A brief history of climate change and conflict

http://www.thebulletin.org/web-edition/features/brief-history-of-climate-change-and-conflict

By James R. Lee | 14 August 2009 Article Highlights

■The interaction between climate change and conflict started as early as 35,000 years ago.
■The Neanderthals, Vikings, and Mayans all benefited and suffered from a changing climate that affected resources such as water, game, and agriculture.
■By analyzing historical case studies of climate and societal collapse, we can identify a set of discernible lessons for today.
In recent years, many foreign affairs experts have attempted to demonstrate the linkages between climate change and the social tensions that can lead to conflict. While critics may believe this is simply a fad in international affairs, history suggests otherwise. Over the last few millennia, climate change has been a factor in conflict and social collapse around the world. The changing climate has influenced how and where people migrate, affected group power relations, and provided new resources to societies while taking away others. Such circumstances cause large-scale alterations in lifestyles and illustrate pathways from climate change to conflict.

Because climate change can be a contentious subject, it's worth taking a moment to answer some basic questions and put forth a series of assumptions. First, what is climate change? The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the most authoritative source on the subject, assesses climate change by measuring changing temperatures and precipitation. Since trends in temperature often (but don't always) drive trends in precipitation, scientists consider temperature a more robust and stable measure of climate change. But in simplest terms, climate change is the long-term change in the patterns of these two meteorological characteristics. Second, does climate change affect the world the same everywhere? In fact, climate change is a heterogeneous phenomenon and produces different outcomes in different places. The subsequent case studies demonstrate that a changing climate can have acute regional effects such as near the equator or North Pole, the "hot" and "cold" zones, respectively. In both cases, "hot" and "cold" conflicts demonstrate how rising and falling temperatures have had different impacts on human survival and prosperity.

Finally, a fact: The relationship between climate and conflict isn't as simple as cause and effect. Instead, climate change events--such as temperature shifts of a few degrees or a precipitation change of a few inches--contribute to conflict gradually over the long term. Because the climate has been changing for millennia, it's possible to look at the past for examples. Do we see cases of climate-conflict interaction when rates of climate change have diverged? In fact, it's possible to assess historical events and records in order to construct pictures of how climate affects conflict. Historical case studies, therefore, allow us to identify three paths from climate change to conflict: sustained trends, intervening variables, and the need for conflict triggers.

Consider each of the paths. The first is that conflict has the potential to emerge after a sustained period of divergent climate patterns. While people can survive aberrant, short-term climate change by exploiting existing or stored resources, this strategy has temporal limits. On this particular path the issue isn't one of surviving an especially fierce rain or harsh winter, but the cumulative effects of many fierce rains and many harsh winters. Next, climate change alone won't cause conflict but, along with other factors, will contribute to and shape it. It's one variable among many others, such as cultural, economic, or demographic factors. Last, unless a society learns to adapt to sustained climate change, its wealth will decline and its social fabric will weaken with each passing year. But even if a society faces these environmental challenges, a trigger--such as an assassination, extreme natural event, or random act of group violence--is usually required to ignite violent conflict.

We can, nevertheless, draw lessons from natural (climate) and human (conflict) interaction that may be transferable to today's global climate challenge by considering three periods in human history: the Holocene warming period, the medieval climate optimum, and the "little ice age."

About 35,000 years ago the Holocene warming period, during which the North American and Eurasian glaciers shrunk, was responsible for ending the last ice age that coincided with the flowering of human culture. This period and its aftermath shaped the climate we live in today. The glaciers receded, and humans migrated north to Eurasia in search of hunting grounds. Probably around today's Middle East region, the humans found plentiful game and encountered the Neanderthals. Over time, humans pushed into Europe and forced the Neanderthals further north into the less hospitable parts of the continent, where game wasn't as abundant and temperatures were much colder. Although the Neanderthals had survived several ice ages over the course of hundreds of thousands of years, they couldn't survive both an ice age and the humans, who enjoyed advanced weaponry and social organization. Of course, theories about the end of the Neanderthals are controversial and unresolved. However, there is no question that climate change provoked the interaction of human societies and the Neanderthals and subsequently led to conflict.

The medieval climate optimum lasted from 500 to 1000. It brought about a period of sustained progress in Europe as warmer conditions allowed for longer growing seasons in the largely agricultural societies. However, conditions elsewhere were quite different. Between 700 and 900, rainfall in China was scarce due to weak summer monsoons that failed to develop over the Pacific Ocean. Gerald Haug and other researchers have concluded PDF that famines caused by the failed monsoons resulted in peasant revolts and fueled the intrastate conflict that drastically weakened, and then led to the complete collapse of, the Tang Dynasty.

Across the globe in North America, the Mayans had settled in the lowlands around 8000 BC and began practicing large-scale farming as early as 2000 BC. By the beginning of the medieval climate optimum in AD 500, the population was nearly 14 million, making it one of the largest centers of civilization anywhere. But the thriving Mayan cities began to experience diminished long-term rainfall patterns. Dry conditions began in 760 and, after a 50-year wet period, drought again set in about 860. Another drought followed in 910. The boom-and-bust cycles of rainy and dry periods contributed to eras of both growth and decline. Technology, population sizes, and agricultural intensity overwhelmed the land. Yields declined with the dry conditions and these structural incongruities led to ongoing wars between Mayan city-states that eventually contributed to their collapse.

The warming in Central America that was disastrous for the Mayans was, on the other hand, fortunate for the Vikings. Warmer temperatures in the north meant their land was more hospitable to live on. Complex push-and-pull factors allowed the Vikings to expand their settlements from Scandinavia to Iceland, Greenland, and later Newfoundland. It was in Newfoundland that they encountered Native Americans. The Native Americans, too, perceived the warmer climate as a new opportunity and fought to control the increasingly abundant land. The Vikings and Native Americans would alternately trade and fight with each other throughout the Vikings' time in Newfoundland.

Enter the "little ice age"--a period marked by abnormally cooler temperatures. Scholars differ on the exact duration of this period; some researchers believe it started as early as 1000 in certain northern regions, whereas other historians, such as noted scholar Brian Fagan, believe it lasted from 1300 to 1850. Regardless, when the climate turned cold, the Viking colonies that had flourished in the warmth of the medieval climate optimum collapsed in Newfoundland (which they had abandoned because of ongoing conflict with the Native Americans). The western Greenland colony was the next to collapse, and around 1350, coinciding with the time of the Black Death, the eastern colony also began to decline. It survived only into the early 1500s.

During the same period, the Anasazi, a hunter-gatherer people who over centuries settled into a sedentary lifestyle, lived along the rivers of what is today the Southwest United States. With gradual improvements in technology and a beneficial climate, their population grew. But the little ice age brought a period of long-term drought, and Anasazi population growth exceeded its resource base. Timber, game, and other resources had to be imported from neighboring areas. The Anasazi had survived a long-term drought and many smaller ones in their long history. So why were they unable to cope with the little ice age drought? Like the Mayans, Anasazi city-states came into conflict as resources dwindled.

Because of its recency, scholars are able to theorize more completely about the little ice age. There were sharp extremes in temperature during the period. In fact, it had two temperature low points, one during the late 1400s and early 1500s, and another during the late 1700s and early 1800s. During the latter extreme cold period, a catastrophic geologic event occurred. In April 1815, Mount Tambora, on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa, threw a massive amount of volcanic dust into the atmosphere in one of the largest volcanic explosions in modern times. The volcanic dust travelled worldwide and blocked the sun's rays, lowering temperatures, especially in the northern hemisphere. The period of extreme cold, coupled with this sudden volcanic eruption, produced the "year without summer."

The year without summer illustrates two different stories--one in Europe and another in North America. In Europe, the cold forced people to migrate. But land across the continent was relatively densely settled, so conflict often came with population movement. On top of this structural problem, the Napoleonic wars culminated shortly before, sapping the vitality and stability of the economy. People were already suffering through instability, but the cold compounded social strife. There were no "pressure valves," such as open land, for populations under temperature-induced duress. The result was social upheaval, riots, and disease.

The cold was just as bad in eastern North America and Canada, where most summer crops were lost. But unlike Europe, there was ample land for climate migrants west of the United States. The building of the Erie Canal in 1817 gradually opened up a westward route for easy migration. Thus, where in Europe people lacked the pressure valve necessary to cope with difficult times, in North America the valve not only existed but its exploitation was encouraged.

These are just a few accounts that allow us to synthesize history into a set of discernible, often regionally specific, lessons on conflict manifestations for today. The impact of climate change is obviously differential in the "hot" and "cold" wars, where trends may reward one part of the world while punishing another--for example, in terms of economic subsistence. In particular, four lessons of conflict emerge from the aforementioned cases that may have application for today's challenges:

■The decline or growth in general resources, such as arable land and fresh water, can cause significant societal impacts. During extremely warm periods in the equatorial zone, marginal lands gradually lose resource assets. This is evident in the drift of the Sahara Desert southward into sub-Saharan Africa, which has occurred over many millennia and continues today. At the same time, in the polar zone, lands and their resources can become more abundant. It was because of this that the Vikings were able to survive for 500 years in Greenland before the little ice age.
■Conflict can exist between societies or within them. By nature, the "hot" and "cold" war zones show divergent paths. In the polar areas, "cold" conflict emerges between states seeking to exploit the new resources that warming makes available. In the equatorial area, which includes many deserts, conflict erupts over declining resources, especially in warmer periods. Such livelihood conflicts often transcend borders and lead to migration. This is particularly evident for historic peoples such as the Mayans and the Anasazi, but also in today's conflicts in the North African Sahel and Sudan's Darfur region.
■There is a full menu of climatic causes of conflict, depending on where the conflict is ("hot" and "cold" war areas), the type of climate change (temperature or precipitation), and the trends in the patterns (increasing or decreasing). In the polar zone, the change in temperature indirectly drives conflict behavior and the impact on inhabitable land is most important. In the equatorial zone, change in precipitation patterns is clearly a major driver, but temperature changes also can influence evaporation rates. Here, water is most important.
■The resiliency of conflict is different in the "hot" and "cold" zones. In the polar zone, conflict is episodic; wars come and go with changes in temperature. In the equatorial zone, conflict is more gradual and continuous. "Hot" wars often stretch on as human population growth and changes in habitat tend to exacerbate changing climate conditions. Simply put, they are "cold" wars of opportunity versus "hot" wars of desperation.
Today, we see the manifestations of climate change slowly emerging in melting glaciers and drying fields. We need to imagine how changes in climate will create possibilities for conflict, using these historical lessons as guides. It's important to note that reacting to the challenges of "hot" and "cold" wars will require different strategies. The past is a good guide, but new types and modes of conflict emerging from climate change are to be expected. In that respect, finding historical examples is easier than contemplating how climate change and conflict will create new models of interaction and present new challenges in the future. After all, the idea that climate change causes conflict is not revolutionary, but evolutionary.
          USA: Ëmstriddent Areesverbuet vum Donald Trump ass a Kraaft   
Zanter en Donneschdeg 20 Auer Lokalzäit gëllt ee prinzipiellt Areesverbuet fir Bierger aus dem Iran, Syrien, dem Jemen, Libyen, Somalia an dem Sudan.
          Bangalow snack-food firm ordered to pay $10,000 to worker   

A Bangalow-based snack-food manufacturer is considering whether to appeal a decision by the Fair Work Commission ordering it pay $10,000 compensation to a South Sudanese refugee over an unfair dismissal case against it.

The post Bangalow snack-food firm ordered to pay $10,000 to worker appeared first on Echonetdaily.


          The Revolution in Transatlantic Affairs   

The year 2001 could have been an eye-opener but the West, too traumatized by the Islamist attack on America, failed to notice an equally important, if less spectacular, development: the creation by China of a coalition, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, including Russia and Central Asia as members, Iran as a silent partner, and India and Pakistan as observers. It took another five years for Western foreign policy experts to realize that this emerging SCO was, for all practical purposes, an OPEC with nukes, which had the potential to develop, over time, into a full-fledged "NATO of the East."

At the NATO summit in Riga in November 2006, a little-noticed transatlantic revolution of sorts finally occurred when the Atlantic Alliance acknowledged that it would have to "go global" in order to remain relevant. Divided, America and Europe will fall; united, they can retain the lead. But all manners of "going global" are not equal, and the coming globalization of NATO is as much full of promises as it is fraught with perils.

Some will argue that, with 50,000 troops present in three continents today, NATO is in essence already global. Others will counter that the story of this halfhearted, haphazard globalization reads at times like a tale told by an idiot, full of rhetorical fog and bureaucratic friction, and signifying nothing more than "flight forward" or "muddling through." In fact, in the post-Cold War period, NATO's desire to have its cake (collective defense) and eat it too (collective security) has created a certain conceptual confusion.2

As a political organization, the Alliance rushed to invoke Article 5 within twenty-four hours of 9/11; as a military organization, NATO turned out to be as ill-prepared to do counterinsurgency in Afghanistan as the U.S. military in Iraq. It would be a mistake, however, to claim that NATO's credibility is at stake in Afghanistan. Afghanistan may have been the graveyard of empires in the past, but it won't be the graveyard of the Alliance -- for a simple reason already pointed out by one European observer:

When the territorial integrity of one of its members is threatened by an attack, NATO cannot afford to lose. It would sacrifice its credibility as an alliance. . . . But in stabilization operations the existence of NATO is not threatened. Here NATO can afford to fail without losing its credibility as an alliance. . . . There are, thus, fundamental differences between collective defense credibility and stabilization credibility. To lump them together or to blur the distinction between the two, shows a lack of understanding for the very nature of such interventions. The consequences of getting stuck in hopeless operations as well as holding NATO's authority and standing hostage to fortune is doubly dangerous. The UN, the institution with the widest experience in post-conflict stabilization to date, has never made these operations a test for its credibility. NATO needs to do likewise.3

If the Alliance survived a debacle of the magnitude of Suez in 1956, it can withstand anything. The main danger for NATO therefore is not military failure or even a Suez-like temporary political meltdown, but something more insidious. Over time, what an ill-conceived globalization of NATO could lead to is the transformation of the tactical coalition that the Shanghai Cooperation Organization currently is into a strategic "NATO of the East" while at the same time perverting the Atlantic Alliance into, so to speak, a "SEATO of the West" -- namely, a make-believe alliance with no viable strategy (because a conventional military configuration is irrelevant when the threats are of the asymmetric variety) and no coherent policy (because the interests of the global members are simply too heterogeneous to ever converge.)

The Long War promises to be a thinking man's war. As a full-fledged Alliance, NATO possesses the kind of staying power that mere ad hoc coalitions cannot deliver; but NATO still has to come to terms with the fact that thinking power will matter more than fighting power. If NATO is to avoid the twofold danger of the SCO becoming a NATO of the East while NATO becomes a mere SEATO of the West, the Alliance will have first of all to downgrade its "toolbox" dimension and beef up its "think-tank" dimension.

The revolution in strategic affairs

Ever since the 1999 intervention in Kosovo, NATO has been eager to prove that it stands for more than "No Action, Talk Only." But the adoption by the Alliance of the Marge Simpson doctrine ("Are we gonna just stand there like the French, or are we gonna do something?") has proved to be no substitute for a new strategic concept. Kosovo itself, waged in no small part to maintain the credibility of the Alliance, ended up paradoxically weakening NATO's credibility and the mutual bad blood afterwards constituted the single most important underlying reason of the 2003 near-death experience over Iraq.

By the time of the 2006 NATO Riga summit, two eminent Americans argued in no uncertain terms in favor of a re-invention of the Alliance: "It is time to stop pretending that everything is fine in Brussels and Mons. NATO will never generate the political impetus and leadership to reinvent itself unless we face that truth and openly debate what this Alliance can and should become. . . . NATO leaders have thus far demonstrated neither the vision nor the political will to reinvent the Alliance."4

Strong words, to be sure, but perhaps the wrong diagnostic: to the extent that there is indeed a danger of NATO drifting into irrelevance, it is due not so much to an absence of philosophical vision and/or political will as to a deficit of strategic literacy on the part of NATO leaders and cheerleaders.

On the American side, there is certainly no shortage of will and vision. Our two authors themselves were instrumental in forcing Europeans to look beyond Brussels sandbox politics and leading the drive for a successful enlargement of NATO. In the process of preaching a gospel of "broader and farther is always better," though, they elevated enlargement to the rank of a Kantian categorical imperative and by the same token lost sight of the Hobbesian iron law known in the jargon of political science as the security dilemma. Simply put: however defensive in intent, any actor's move to increase its security always runs the risk of being perceived as an offensive move by another actor.5

As Vladimir Putin reminded the West in a very Russian way in his Munich speech earlier this year, one state's idea of "projecting stability" is another's idea of "exporting subversion." Enlargement has been a bold move that played a critical (and often underappreciated) role in the successful transition to democracy of the former captive Europe, but for every action there is a reaction, and the gradual enlargement of NATO to the East has been the main cause of Russia's gradual rapprochement with China. A bold move today would be to acknowledge that, for a host of reasons, this process has reached diminishing returns, and that projecting stability should from now on be achieved at less cost through other means, be it security cooperation or global partnerships.

If Americans these days tend to have forgotten something as basic as the security dilemma, Europeans for their part have serious difficulties remembering something equally basic that they used to perform with undeniable virtuosity: coercive diplomacy. Be it with Iraq yesterday or Iran today, an astounding percentage of the allegedly sophisticated EU elites have the hardest time grasping what any American redneck knows intuitively: namely, that the collective threat to use force is still the best way to avoid having recourse to actual force. Fifty years of increasing focus on intra-EU politics has led EU elites to mistake "multi-level governance" (read: horse-trading by capitals in Brussels) for the whole of statecraft. But genuine diplomacy always rests on the implicit threat to use force, and the EU mantra about force as last resort should logically lead Europeans to view coercive diplomacy as their preferred weapon.6

Iraq, to be sure, was in many ways sui generis. Iran, by contrast, should be a no-brainer, since a nuclear Iran would lead to nuclear proliferation throughout the Middle East all the way to Algeria. Were coercive diplomacy to fail, then, as Senator McCain put it, there would still be one thing worse than military intervention in Iran -- a nuclear Iran.

This question of "strategic literacy" of NATO leaders cannot be overemphasized at a time when NATO allies are elaborating a new (i.e., post 9/11) strategic concept. The task promises to be a daunting one if only because, since the end of the Cold War, the very concept of "strategy" has become increasingly problematic in the West -- in no small part because the concept of the "West" itself is no longer self-evident.7

Forget the "Americans are from Mars, Europeans from Venus" mantra that gave the Brussels Eurocracy the vapors in the summer of 2002.8 Though the slogan captured well a moment of transatlantic relations, over time this mantra has obscured the issue. The truth is, for the past 15 years, and on both sides of the Atlantic, there have been two major attempts underway to get rid of the strategy problematique altogether.

In the civilian world, politicians and bureaucrats have robbed the concept of "strategy" of any meaning by systematically using it interchangeably with "policy." Academics and think-tankers, for their part, have chosen to blow out of proportion a Revolution in Security Affairs in which "the dividing lines between hard and soft, civil and military security are rapidly dissolving, requiring far more flexibility and causing much confusion as allies and partners have disagreed significantly about how to manage such complexity." This supposed Revolution has been used as a pretext to dissolve the concept of "strategy" in the catch-all notion of "security," the concept of "national security" itself in a nebulous "human security," and last but not least, the concept of grand strategy into that of global governance -- whatever that may mean.9

Within the military, the concept of "strategy" has not fared much better. The post-Cold War era has witnessed a surreal debate between the disciples of Clausewitz, who invariably confuse strategy with the operational level of war, and the supporters of the supposed Revolution in Military Affairs reducing war to "targeting and shooting," and whose network-centric paradigm leads to a tacticization of strategy.10

Between the shock-and-awe slogans of the military Mars, and the human security fairy tales of the civilian Venus, Strategy in the West has been MIA for too long. Since the real Revolution in Strategic Affairs happens to be a non-Western affair, NATO leaders will have to start by learning the new grammar and logic of the kind of unrestricted warfare elaborated by the Chinese and the fourth-generation warfare practiced by Islamists.11

As U.S. NATO Ambassador Victoria Nuland argued, "if the divisive debate over Iraq taught us one thing, it is that NATO must be the place where we talk about all the issues affecting our future -- the Middle East, Iraq, North Korea, China, Iran, just to name a few." The North Atlantic Council has recently broadened its range of consultations to include global issues ranging from energy security to transnational terrorism. But increased consultation, in and of itself, will not mechanically lead to better conceptualization. Enhancing the strategic literacy of NATO's stakeholders should be the logical prerequisite to a debate about the future NATO strategic concept.

The SCO as NATO peer competitor?

In the past hundred years, the instrumentalization of Islam has been a recurrent temptation on the part of every rising power, be it Wilhemine Germany or Imperial Japan, Nazi Germany or Soviet Russia, not to mention America itself. As the latest rising power, China itself would not be immune to that temptation even if it were energy self-sufficient. The fact that China's energy needs are huge guarantees that the constitution of a Sino-Islamic axis is for Beijing not just a tactical option, but a strategic necessity.12

While the pivotal states of this strategy appear to be Pakistan, Iran, and (more recently) Saudi Arabia, the geopolitical situation of Iran puts it in a class by itself, as the most precious proxy in China's "indirect approach" against American primacy. It is therefore no surprise to learn that China is using Iran as a conduit for the delivery of arms to both Iraqi and Afghan insurgents, and providing Iran itself the kind of small boats needed to conduct attacks against commercial shipping or the U.S. Navy in the Persian Gulf.13

If the instrumentalization of Islam constitutes the geographical axis of China's grand strategy, the functional axis is -- or ought to be -- of equal interest to NATO, since it consists in the artful combination of space power, sea power, and soft power.

Space power. While lending support to Russia's ludicrous posturing on NATO missile defense, China is experimenting with antisatellite weapons -- a disturbing trend given the reliance of modern military (especially navies) on space power.

Sea power. A hundred years after Theodore Roosevelt sent his Great While Fleet around the world to signal the emergence of a new great power, China is rediscovering the writings of Admiral Mahan on the importance of sea power in history and dreaming of a Great White Fleet of its own. Against the backdrop of an ever-shrinking U.S. Navy (more on that later), China is transforming itself as a maritime superpower at such high speed that Western analysts estimate it could become the world's leading naval power by 2020.

Last but not least, soft power. On the military side, China is focusing on developing security cooperation within the ASEAN Regional Forum framework with the intent of marginalizing America. On the civilian side, China is peddling "Asian values" from Africa to Eurasia and from Latin America to Southeast Asia. For the past six years, China has been promoting autocracy through soft power while America has been promoting democracy through hard power, and the verdict is in: China today has a more positive image worldwide than America.14

Russia's relation to the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, and its expectations, are of an altogether different nature. On the surface, to be sure, China and Russia appear to be the two main pillars of the SCO. Economically and militarily, the two countries' relation is, for the time being at least, one of genuine complementarity. But while the SCO constitutes the core of China's Islamic strategy, it is for Russia a tactical option to both manage the rise of China in Eurasia and to gain leverage over the West.15

Unlike China, Russia is energy self-sufficient; and unlike China's Confucianism, Russia's Eurasianism actually comes in two opposite versions: one pro-West and anti-Islam; the other pro-Islam and anti-West. American Putin-bashers would do well to realize that the Putin regime clearly favors the former version --- which may not be the case for his successor. Putin's Russia is a mystery wrapped in an enigma only for those caught in a 15-year time warp. In a nutshell: While Yelstin's choice of an alleged Polish model of transition in 1992 resulted, by 1999, in 38 percent of the population living below the poverty line, Putin's reorientation toward a Chinese model has since created an annual growth rate of 6 percent for Russia -- and a 70 percent approval rating for Putin. Having taken considerable domestic risks by siding with America after 9/11, Putin, for the past 5 years, has received nothing in return -- other than a seemingly endless enlargement of NATO in his own backyard.

Now that Russia is rich with oil money and has paid its debts to the West, what Russia wants from the West is respect.16 Russia's nuisance capacity should not be underestimated, even though threats to withdraw from the CFE Treaty, or to turn the Gas Exporting Countries Forum (GECF) into a "natural gas OPEC," are intended primarily for domestic consumption and to signal that NATO has enlarged far enough.

Unlike China, Russia is not a rising power. Russian hearts and mind are still up for grabs, though, and there are three reasons why it would be grossly irresponsible to alienate Russia gratuitously. In the short term, Russia's support is critical to solve (militarily or not) the Iranian question; in the middle-term, Russia has considerable leverage over Europe, with much bigger sticks and carrots than America's, and the risk of a creeping Finlandization of Europe is real were America to indulge in brinkmanship; in the long term, the West would have nothing to gain were Russia, against its best interest, to upgrade its relations to the SCO from the tactical to the strategic level.

The current demonization of Russia in some American quarters is thus incomprehensible, unless one keeps in mind the particular conceit of democracies at war that Kennan, following Tocqueville, pointed out long ago: "There is nothing in nature more egocentrical than the embattled democracy. It soon becomes the victim of its own propaganda. It then tends to attach to its own cause an absolute value which distorts its own vision of everything else. . . . People who have got themselves into this frame of mind have little understanding for the issues of any contest other than the one in which they are involved."17

This tunnel vision, and the incapacity to distinguish between the essential and the peripheral, is all the more surprising when it comes from the neoconservative side. Among the new generation of neocons, many seem to have forgotten the lessons of the older generation, as captured in Jeanne Kirkpatrick's celebrated 1979 essay on "Dictatorships and Double Standards." Simply put: when all is said and done, there is a difference in kind between totalitarianism and authoritarianism. If Islamist totalitarianism is the main enemy, as the neocons rightly claim, then it follows logically that Russian authoritarianism, however unpalatable to democratic sensibilities, is something we can live with. In that respect, the arch-realist Kissinger is paradoxically closer to Kirkpatrick than some of today's neocons in arguing:

Russia may be tempted to pursue tactical rapprochement with China. But any meaningful strategic rapprochement with China would move Russia further away from the United States and into a position of dependence on Chinese support. This would run counter to the strategic realities Russia faces on its far-eastern border, given the decline in its population and negative demographic trends. We cannot be fixated by things that are in the power of Russia and China to do. The wise American policy is to establish close relations with both Russia and China. And we should conduct it on the basis that whenever possible there should always be at least equal if not greater incentives or prospect of risks to cooperate with the United States than with each other.18

Similarly, a wise NATO policy should always make sure that NATO-Russia security cooperation is always stronger than Russia-China security cooperation. By the same token, and given the always-possible energy Finlandization of Europe, a wise NATO policy should make sure that the NATO-Russia Council always remains one step ahead of the EU-Russia Permanent Council.19

The Great Game and the Long War

One thing is certain: the Great Game and the Long War will be the two global and generational challenges confronting the West in the next 30 years. While the two challenges at times overlap, they remain analytically distinct. Attempts to conflate the two challenges with a new geopolitical concept like "Greater Middle East" risk confusing the issues. The Great Game? While the West remains fixated on the continental dimension, the East shows more lucidity in giving as much importance to the maritime dimension (more on that later). The Long War? Due to mass migration, the sociopolitical umma no longer coincides with the geopolitical Dar al-Islam.20

So much for the Greater Middle East, then. When all is said and done, globalization has not so much led to the "spiritualization of borders" (as the flute-players would have it) as to the partial "virtualization of geopolitics." The Great Game and the Long War are global and generational, but the geopolitics of oil, of Islamic banking, of Islamic media, etc. only partly overlap, and the geopolitical mapping required is a multi-level mapping including both the real and the virtual worlds.

One of the unfortunate consequences of the globalization theology of the 1990s has been the withering away of geopolitical thinking in the West. This eclipse of geopolitics is not totally negative, to be sure, for as one pundit put it, "few modern ideologies are as whimsically all-encompassing, as romantically obscure, as intellectually sloppy, and as likely to start a third world war as the theory of 'geopolitics.'"21

Yet, globalization theology itself has proven even more intellectual sloppy than the theories of geopolitics. And while the West thought it could do away with geopolitics altogether, the foreign policies of Turkey, Russia, China, and other players were becoming increasingly shaped by distinctive geopolitical visions based less on theories than on memories (with often a tenuous link to historical reality). Thus in Turkey, memories of the Silk Road were the main driving forces in Ankara's turn away from pro-Western Kemalism and toward neo-Ottomanism. In China, a country that had traditionally viewed itself as a quintessential continental power, it is the rediscovery of the short-lived maritime adventures of Admiral Zheng He (the Chinese Columbus) and the awareness of missed opportunities, coupled with the revival of Admiral Mahan's navalist theories, that were being invoked to mobilize public opinion around the idea of turning China into a maritime superpower. Intellectually sloppy or not, these representations have real effects in the foreign policies of non-Western nations. The West can ignore them only at its own peril.

In the West itself, the current fixation of America on Central Asia and of Europe on the Middle East -- the closest thing to a "Western" geopolitical vision -- is based on two flawed premises. To put it crudely: Americans believe that Caspian Sea oil is the key to success in the Great Game; Europeans are convinced that the resolution of the Palestinian question holds the key to victory in the Long War.

Talk about intellectual sloppiness: Warnings about a Caspian mirage were already common among energy experts a decade ago, and time has only made them more relevant: "The current fixation with the Caspian Basin's alleged resource bonanza is exaggerating the region's commercial and strategic significance, distorting US foreign policy calculations and raising the risk of unnecessary contention with other actors, particularly Russia and Iran. . . . Russian analysts could be forgiven for construing US/NATO policies as encirclement from the West through open-ended NATO expansion. . . . The myth [of Central Asia and the Caucasus as a region of independent democracies buoyed by new-found oil wealth and part of an expanding "Euro-Atlantic community"] is diverting policy-makers from a far more profound geopolitical challenge to energy security in the twenty-first century: the rising dependence of Asian nations on Persian Gulf oil. . . . It might be wise to ponder how comfortable China will be in relying on the US Navy to defend the sea-lanes through which its Persian Gulf oil must pass."22

Ten years later, it is clear that just as NATO enlargement to the East has sent Russia into the arms of China, Western energetico-military forays in Central Asia have led China, in turn, to increase its activities in the backyards of Europe (Africa) and America (from Cuba to Panama and Venezuela). America's fixation on Central Asia has been based on probable reserves, which were then contrasted to proven reserves in Persian Gulf, though never with probable reserves offshore worldwide. Since Caspian Sea oil now seems to combine all the problems associated with landlocked transportation and offshore extraction, not to mention geopolitical entanglements, it may be time for a reappraisal.

If American fixation on Central Asia is questionable, European fixation on the Palestinian question as the panacea of the Greater Middle East is downright irrational. As Edward Luttwak pointed out recently: "Yes, it would be nice if Israelis and Palestinians could settle their differences, but it would do little or nothing to calm the other conflicts in the Middle East from Algeria to Iraq, or to stop Muslim-Hindu violence in Kashmir, Muslim-Christian violence in Indonesia and the Philippines, Muslim-Buddhist violence in Thailand, Muslim-animist violence in Sudan, Muslim-Igbo violence in Nigeria, Muslim-Moscovite violence in Chechnya, or the different varieties of inter-Muslim violence."

This European fixation is all the more irrational in that as far as the proverbial Arab Street is concerned, the resolution of the Palestinian question ranks only seventh in importance, way behind the usual bread-and-butter issues (employment, health, corruption, education, and even combating extremism and protecting civil rights). And who can blame Ali Six-Pack for his lack of interest? Unlike the Kurds, who have proven capable of self-government, Palestinian leaders have never missed an opportunity to miss an opportunity, as the saying holds. The pathetic clash between Fatahland and Hamastan is today leading many Palestinians themselves to reconsider the long-abandoned possibility of forming a confederation with Jordan. It is time for Europeans to realize that, as Joseph Joffe demonstrated in a seminal article, "far from creating tensions, Israel actually contains more antagonisms than it causes" -- though of course you would never know it, since Israeli public diplomacy is nonexistent.23

Flawed premises aside, there is another, more pedestrian reason why the closing of the transatlantic mind is particularly pronounced within NATO. As the Alliance underwent a gradual transformation from collective defense to collective security, this functional broadening focused on the continental dimension led to a neglect of the maritime dimension and thus to transatlantic tunnel vision.

During the Cold War, the Atlantic Alliance had two geographic pillars: the Brussels-based Allied Command-Europe (ACE) for continental affairs, the Norfolk-based Allied Command-Atlantic (ACLANT) for maritime affairs. From 1991 to 2001, the maritime dimension, once identified with the Atlantic, became confined to the Mediterranean (Operation Sharp Guard). Yet, despite the shrinking of the maritime dimension at the operational level, ACLANT continued, at the intellectual level, to deliver outside-the-box, yet topical thinking on issues like "Multinational Naval Cooperation and Foreign Policy into the 21st Century."24

The real change occurred with the 2002 Prague Summit's decision to transform these two geographical pillars into functional pillars: Allied Command Operations (ACO) and Allied Command Transformation (ACT). The transformation of the geographical ACLANT into a functional ACT did more than marginalize the maritime dimension; it also brought the wrong transformation to the fore. NATO-ACT being twinned with the U.S. Joint Forces Command (JFCOM), the Alliance, in the name of interoperability, soon adopted all the shibboleths of the RMA: network-centric warfare, information dominance, the change from threat-based planning to capabilities-based planning which can only aggravate the idea of the Alliance as a "toolbox," and last but not least, the religion of jointness itself, whose unintended effect was to downplay the specificity and autonomy of navies when it comes to constabulary and diplomatic missions.

The whole RMA folklore was introduced to NATO right at the time when, in Iraq and Afghanistan, its limits were becoming too obvious to ignore. The Pentagon is today trying to find a better balance between Network-Centric Warfare (NCW) and Culture-Centric Warfare (CCW), and one would hope that ACT will quickly NATO-ize the lessons learned in theater.

In and of itself, though, this rebalancing will not bring the kind of maritime domain awareness that is so crucial for an understanding of both the Great Game and the Long War. Outside the Anglo-Saxon world, to be sure, Western policymakers and opinion leaders have rarely been literate when it comes to naval strategy. Though this is not the place for a comprehensive tour d'horizon of the military, political, diplomatic, and constabulary uses of seapower25, basic "maritime domain awareness" is necessary when discussing the future globalization of NATO.

On the military side, the importance of the maritime dimension begins with the fact that, for all the talk about airlift capabilities, 90 percent of military lift remains sealift. But what is more noteworthy about the post-Cold War period is the fact that the decline of "maritime domain awareness" within the Atlantic Alliance took place precisely at the time when globalization was significantly increasing the importance of the maritime dimension on the commercial side (85 percent of world trade volume and 60 percent of oil and gas travels by sea) and of maritime security, all too often confused with -- and reduced to -- maritime safety.

It is hard to imagine a "Global NATO" -- in whatever shape or form -- that would continue to ignore the global commons the way today's NATO does. It is time for NATO's maritime commitment to match its continental commitment. To put it only half in jest: Either NATO will go out to sea, or it will go out of business.

The new Rimland

NATO was created as the political-military expression of the containment doctrine. While the father of the doctrine was diplomat George Kennan, the godfather of containment was geopolitician Nicholas Spykman. During World War II Spykman had challenged the centrality of the concept of the "Heartland" developed a generation earlier by Halford Mackinder (against Mahan's sea power thesis), and focused instead on what he called the "Rimland," by which he meant essentially continental countries with a maritime facade.

As Spykman defined it, the Rimland "functions as a vast buffer zone of conflict between sea power and land power. Looking in both directions, it must function amphibiously and defend itself on land and sea." On this geopolitical foundation laid by Spykman, Kennan simply built a chronopolitical strategy of containment, which would pay off 50 years later (much later than initially anticipated by Kennan).

In 1904, Mackinder had made the grandiose pronouncement: "Who rules East Europe commands the Heartland; who rules the Heartland commands the World Island; who rules the World Island commands the World." The Cold War was to prove Mackinder wrong and Spykman right: For 50 years, the Soviet Heartland did rule Eastern Europe; if it fails to command the world, it's because it failed to rule what really matters, i.e., the Rimland.

Throughout the Cold War, then, it is the concept of Rimland which provided the geopolitical underpinnings for a grand strategy of containment and its security architecture, of which NATO constituted only one pillar (arguably the most important) along with SEATO and CENTO. Today, the Soviet Union is gone and, against all odds, NATO is still around. True, today's NATO is not your father's NATO, but equally true, today's Rimland is not your father's Rimland -- and it is not clear that today's NATO has fully grasped all the implications of the sea-change.

Today's Rimland is a 400-mile wide amphibious area. In contrast to 1904, the Heartland today is an empty shell, and not just because of Russia's demographic decline. In China, the population is deserting the Heartland and moving to the coast. Worldwide, today's Rimland is both leaner and meaner than a century ago; no longer the "buffer zone of conflict" described by Mackinder or Spykman, this overpopulated Rimland, with 4 billion people living within 200-mile wide coastlands, is the "epicenter of all conflicts."

Should NATO care? As a military alliance, NATO cannot afford to ignore the increasing covergence of littoral warfare, amphibious warfare and urban warfare -- an issue to which the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard, and Marine Corps are devoting increasing attention. As a security organization, NATO's reasons for caring should be based on a recent report produced by the Center for Naval Analyses entitled "National Security and the Threat of Climate Change," describing a number of not exactly rosy scenarios regarding the political-military consequences of rising sea levels in the next 30 years. The hard security consequences of soft-power issues: This is the kind of outside-the-box thinking that NATO should itself promote.26

Equally interesting is the other phenomenon happening on the new Rimland: the so-called territorialization of the seas. The belated implementation, in the 1990s, of the 1982 Law of the Sea (UNLOS) and in particular of the 200 mile Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ), has had over time unintended effects. Due to the existence of more than one hundred EEZs, 32 percent of the ocean is today under some sort of national jurisdiction. We are talking an area of 28 million square miles, i.e. four times the size of Russia (America's EEZ itself is two-thirds the size of the continental United States and accounts for 30 percent of the U.S. oil production).

The process of territorialization of the seas has been twofold: the "enlarging" of territorial waters from 12 miles to 200 miles, but also the "deepening" of territorialization. Twenty years ago, offshore wells were being drilled in just a few hundred feet of water; with ever-improving technology, prospecting then moved to deep water (i.e. beyond 1,300 feet) and more recently still to "ultra-deep" drilling under as much as 10,000 feet, with dramatic consequences for some countries like Brazil, who went from quasi-total dependence on foreign oil to quasi-total independence.

For all the post-Cold War talk about the decline of the state, there is at least one domain where the state is in expansion, and it is the sea. And for all the talk about a Great Game in Central Asia, it is worth keeping in mind that more than 30 percent of the world's oil and 50 percent of the world's natural gas is produced offshore. The percentage is greater still when moving from proven reserves (i.e., 90 percent certainty) to probable reserves (50 percent certainty). Add to that the fact that 60 percent of the world's oil and gas is transported by sea, and in the end, it is hard to deny that command of the high seas will matter just as much as control of the Heartland.

A little-noticed global chasm is occurring today in terms of geopolitics: As the center of gravity of world history is shifting from the Atlantic to the Pacific, the Western mind, traditionally maritime, is rapidly closing itself to anything other than continental matters, while the Asian mind, traditionally continental, is becoming increasingly maritime in outlook.

In the East, a region lacking a security regime analogous to NATO, the lack of clarity of the law of the sea regarding such issues as military and intelligence-gathering activities in the EEZs of other countries, and the competing claims for territorial waters and seabeds, has become a game increasingly fraught with dangers. The best known example is the Spratly Islands, one hundred or so islands scattered over an area the size of France, said to hold more oil than Kuwait, and situated right in the middle of one of the busiest sea lanes, used by 300 ships a day. The Islands are claimed in part or totality by no fewer than 17 countries, and five of them (including China) actually have small military forces on these otherwise uninhabited islands.

Unlike the legendary Great Game between England and Russia throughout the nineteenth century, the current Great Game at sea involved more than two players: America and China, the two greatest oil consumers, but also Japan and India, Malaysia and Indonesia, and other countries. This multiplicity of actors gives the seaborne Great Game a greater unpredictability. And unlike the slow moving Great Game in Central Asia in the nineteenth century, which resembles a leisurely game of chess, today's Great Game in the Asian Sea at times is more like Russian roulette, in that "incidents at sea" -- like the October 2006 close encounter of a Chinese sub with the USS Kitty Hawk -- have the potential to trigger unintended and unpleasant developments quickly.

The Great Game at sea is too complex to be examined in detail here. Suffice it to say that if in terms of transportation, the true identity of the players takes forever to sort out (the nationalities of the owner, the crew, the flag, the cargo), there is a clear trend in the nationalization of oil companies when it comes to production: "The percentage of the world's oil reserves held by publicly traded international oil companies (IOCs) has declined, while the percentage held by state-owned national oil companies (NOCs) has increased. Currently, 72 percent of the world's proven oil reserves are held by NOC's [the majority of which are Russian and Chinese]."27

Should NATO care? When you put together the territorialization of the seas and the nationalization of oil companies, the Great Game at sea becomes worth examining (e.g., the 2006 decision of the Cuban regime to hire Chinese NOCs for offshore drilling -- 45 miles off the coast of Florida). China's interest in Cuba, Panama, and Venezuela shows that the "string of pearls" strategy of China goes beyond the Persian Gulf to the South China Sea and the Gulf of Guinea, extending into the Western Hemisphere all the way to America's Caribbean backyard. Since Chinese NOCs are present in 50 countries and play with different rules than regular international oil companies, one would think that the geopolitics of the NOCs could be a suitable topic of discussion in the NAC.

For now, the Great Game at sea affects the Pacific more than the Atlantic, and as such has not directly affected NATO. But it certainly affects NATO's new global partners (Australia and Japan, Korea and New Zealand), who all happen to be maritime powers in the Pacific, and this is something that NATO will have to factor in when deciding the nature of its relationship with non-Atlantic powers. Global partnerships will have to be a two-way street, or there will be no global partnership.

In that respect, it is worth remembering that, in its day, SEATO included non-Asian countries like the UK and France, whose threat perceptions over time evolved differently from those of Australia and New Zealand (not to mention Thailand or the Philippines), and eventually SEATO went the way of the dodo.28 Therefore, when talking about NATO's global partners, one cannot avoid raising SEATO-related issues: Do allies and would-be partner nations have the same threat perceptions? What kind of "added value" will the concept of global partnership offer not only to the former, but also to the latter? In what ways can global partners become a force multiplier for the Atlantic Alliance, and in what way can it lead instead to an "entangling alliance"?

New perils, then, but also new promises. The maritime dimension is an opportunity for European allies to go beyond the "EU sandbox" and play a global role at relatively little cost, if only because public opinion will always find a maritime commitment more palatable than a continental one. For many allies like Norway and Greece, a greater maritime commitment on the part of NATO would also be a way to display niche capabilities (it's not as if the U.S. Navy had a surplus of mine-sweepers) that they don't necessarily possess in land operations. Last but not least, for a country like France, a middle-sized power as a land power but a maritime superpower of sorts (the third largest EEZ in the world thanks to its South Pacific possessions), a greater maritime commitment would be a way to maintain a leadership position. When it comes to NATO, to be sure, France, since 1958, has never missed an opportunity to miss an opportunity. With Chirac and Villepin gone, however, it may well be that France will no longer confuse History with histrionics, and volonte de puissance with capacite de nuisance.

The Great Game at sea is only beginning. However fanciful they may be given the current international legal regime, Putin's claim in June 2007 to a chunk of the North Pole holding twice the oil reserves of Saudi Arabia gives an idea of the challenges ahead as global warming increases the areas available for offshore drilling.

The Long War at sea

The maritime dimension is as important for the Long War as it is for the Great Game. Before the attack on the Twin Towers, the attack on the USS Cole gave the West an idea of what asymmetric warfare can accomplish (17 sailors killed and $250 million worth of repairs for a terrorist operation that cost $40,000 to launch). That asymmetric warfare at sea shows great promise has not been lost on the jihadists who, when all is said and done, are less interested in restoring a caliphate (a goal they know is beyond their reach) than in making the West bleed to death economically.

Nine million containers enter U.S. ports each year, and 80 percent of U.S. port facilities these days are owned by foreign companies. It is estimated that the detonation of a 10-to-20 kiloton nuclear weapon in a container would cause a disruption of trade valued at $100 billion to $300 billion, property damage of $50 billion to $500 billion, and the loss of 50,000 to 1 million lives. A mere dirty bomb smuggled in a container would kill very few people, but the disruption would cost $58 billion and it would take 19 days for ports to resume normal operations and 92 days to stabilize the container backlog -- by which time the disruption could well spawn a recession.

The trauma caused by two planes crashing into the Twin Towers has made us forget that al Qaeda and its associates have a maritime strategy more sophisticated than blowing up the USS Cole. Before his arrest, the man responsible for the Cole attack himself had undertaken preparation to attack shipping in the Mediterranean with a four pronged-strategy: "ramming, blowing up medium-size ships near other vessels or at ports, attacking large vessels such as supertankers from the air by using explosive laden small aircraft, and attacking vessels with underwater demolition teams using limpet mines or with suicide bombers. During his interrogation, Nashiri revealed that if warships became too difficult to approach, tourist ships could be targeted. The cruise ship industry, which in the U.S. alone carries nearly seven million passengers every year, is facing this new threat."29

Eighty percent of world trade travels by sea, and 60 percent of the world's oil is shipped by about 4,000 tankers: "Were terrorist pirates to hijack a large bulk carrier or oil tanker, sail it into one of the chokepoints, and scuttle it to block the sea-lane, the consequences for the world economy would be severe: a spike in oil prices, an increase in the cost of shipping due to the need to use alternate routes, congestion in sea-lanes and ports, more expensive maritime insurance, and probable environmental disaster. Worse yet would be several such attacks happening simultaneously in multiple locations worldwide."30

A rogue nuclear missile on Paris or Berlin is decidedly more unlikely in the next five years than the hijacking and sinking of a couple of supertankers in the Strait of Gibraltar or the Bosphorus. The latter, in particular, is less than a mile wide in some areas, and 10 percent of the 50,000 ships that pass through it each year are tankers carrying Russian and Caspian oil.

In the Turkish strait in 1996, the nine pro-Chechen gunmen who hijacked a Turkish ferry and held 255 passengers hostage for three days had first considered the possibility of sabotaging one of the two suspension bridges with explosives to bring down the bridge and close shipping traffic. The worst case scenario, now that the Russian Duma has passed a bill to transport 20,000 tons of nuclear waste through the straits in the next ten years, is the possibility of one of these tankers being hijacked in the vicinity of Istanbul, a city of 12 million inhabitants. It is expected that traffic on the Bosphorus will be 50 percent higher in 2010 than it was in 2005, and so will the opportunities to create catastrophic mischief.

NATO military planners and civilian policymakers continue to think in terms of nation-states and regional "areas of operation," whereas, as the navy community knows full well, maritime threats are more often than not nonstate and transregional in nature. But terrorist networks are genuinely transnational: the Sri Lankan LTTE not only owned and operated a fleet of ten ocean-going freighters flying Panamian, Honduran, and Liberian flags, it also hijacked commercial vessels carrying weapons to reroute them to the Tamil Tigers. In 1994, the LTTE shipped 50 metric tons of TNT on board one of its own freighters operated by a front company from a Ukrainian Black Sea port via the Turkish Straits to Sri Lanka.

NATO is today paying less attention to potential maritime threats affecting its own civilian populations than to making the non-Western world safe for democracy (or sharia, since the jury is still out). If NATO wants to survive another 30 years, it will have to focus a little more on the concerns of its own population.

Global NATO, thousand ship navy

In the 1990s, some foreign policy analysts called on the United States to adopt a policy known as "offshore balancing." Succinctly put, "offshore balancing is predicated on the assumption that attempting to maintain U.S. hegemony is self-defeating because it will provoke other states to combine in opposition to the United States, and result in a futile depletion of the United States' relative power, thereby leaving it worse off than if it accommodated multipolarity."31 Whether such an offshore balancing is still possible or desirable for the U.S. in a post-9/11 environment is highly debatable. But a maritime globalization of NATO could become, for the Alliance itself, the continuation of "offshore balancing" by other means. Its main merit would be to constitute a hedging strategy of sorts against the SCO.

China is emerging as a maritime superpower as quickly as America itself (not to mention the UK) is declining as a naval power, to the point where China could become the leading naval power by 2020. The Russian Navy, which until now was a pale shadow of Gorshkov's navy (since 1991, the number of submarines has declined from 317 to 61 and of surface ships from 967 to 186) has announced plans to build a class of four new aircraft carriers in 2013-14, with initial service to begin in 201732. One would do well to remember that it took hardly more than a decade during the Cold War for Russia, the quintessential land power, to develop a formidable navy. In 20 years, we could realistically see a China/Russia-led SCO that is hegemonic not only on land but at sea. As counterintuitive as it may be at first, NATO would be wise to consider the possibility of making maritime cooperation the centerpiece of NATO-Russia security cooperation.

Maritime operations are of course not foreign to NATO. In the 1990s, Operation Sharp Guard constituted a dress rehearsal of sorts for Operation Active Endeavor after 9/11. In 2003, OAE was expanded functionally and geographically to cover the whole Mediterranean and ended up including some Mediterranean Dialogue countries as well as Russia and Ukraine. Many NATO allies participate in the Container Security Initiative (CSI) and the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI), and it is no coincidence that the former head of Joint Forces-Naples, Admiral Mullen (the current chief of naval operations and JCS chairman-designate), is the one who developed the concept of the "Thousand Ship Navy" (TSN), which is today the talk of the U.S. Navy.

Though globalization has increased the importance of maritime affairs, there has been both a relative and an absolute decline of U.S. seapower, with a U.S. Navy today at its lowest level in the post-World War II era. For the first time in 20 years, the U.S. is in the process of drafting a new maritime strategy, but with a considerably reduced force that went from 600 to fewer than 300 ships, and with new responsibilities in terms of nonmilitary maritime security. Hence the concept of the Thousand Ship Navy, which is meant to create a global maritime partnership with foreign navies.33

TSN is much more than an attempt to make a virtue of necessity. The Thousand Ship Navy -- the "Great White Fleet" of the twenty-first century -- represents a revolution in military affairs in that the concept raises the "network-centric" paradigm established by Admiral Cebrowsky from the domain of strategy (Network-Centric Warfare) to that of security (Global Maritime Partnership). In the process, it brings back a much-needed balance between techno-centric and culture-centric skills as components of success. Just as important, the TSN concept also represents a revolution in diplomatic affairs, in that a global maritime partnership would go beyond the traditional military-to-military contacts and, as Admiral Mullen points out, would unite "maritime forces, port operators, commercial shippers, and international, governmental and nongovernmental agencies to address mutual concerns."

As the Proliferation Security Initiative in Asia shows, though, this twenty-first- century naval diplomacy presents formidable challenges in terms of redefinitions of "sovereignty." Though the TSN concept is still a work in progress, it is worth noting that naval representatives from 72 countries have already taken part in the first symposium on the subject. NATO would do well to examine if the indirect approach of "going global" through a Thousand Ship Navy path is not also the best way to avoid making self-defeating waves in Asia.

Strategic considerations aside, there is an additional reason for Global NATO to get associated with the Thousand Ship Navy. Hard as it is to remember today, there was a time when NATO captured the imagination of Western audiences: Until the mid-sixties, in fact, the prospect of an Atlantic Union was seen in Europe as the wave of the future, while the idea of a European Union was associated mainly with coal, steel, and the standardization of electric plugs.34 Today, hard as they try, the 700 million people of the West can't really bring themselves to get exited when the "deliverables" of NATO Summits amount to -- the purchase of three C-17s? If that is NATO's level of ambition these days, no wonder that even the EU is beginning to look good. NATO will require nothing less than a Thousand Ship Navy if it is to recapture the imagination of public opinion.

NATO and the rise of UN-istan

Two organizations emerged in short succession from the 1941 Atlantic Charter: the United Nations in 1945 and, when the UN proved ineffective in a Cold War context, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in 1949. For the next 50 years, NATO's role in waging and winning the Cold War was as central as that of the UN was marginal.

In the early days of the post Cold War, there were, on both sides of the Atlantic, great hopes that the UN could finally play the role it was initially designed for. A former ambassador to the UN, the elder Bush in particular hoped to make the UN the cornerstone of a New World Order. In Europe as well, as the EU was toying with the idea of transforming itself from an Europe-espace to an Europe-puissance, many thought that an EU military force could constitute the military arm of the UN, and that the EU, in turn, could use the UN as a force multiplier to provide a "counterweight" to the US.

The fixation of EU elites on this idea led them to overlook the various scandals that marred the UN throughout the 1990s (from the Rwanda genocide to the Iraq oil-for-food program). More important, there is great reluctance on the part of EU public opinion at large to acknowledge the fact that, in the process of enlarging 54 members in 1945 to 184 in 1993, the UN's initial goals have been perverted.

Once the embodiment of Western ideals, the UN has turned into a lean, mean anti-West machine. Though European publics no longer have any illusion today about a Europe-puissance, they still retain a surprisingly boy-scoutish view of the UN, one that no longer corresponds to reality. European public opinion saw nothing wrong, for instance, in the recent establishment of an International Criminal Court that would give its prosecutor the power of a grand inquisitor, in part because they are not aware of the politicization of the UN (and of the potential use of the ICC as an anti-Western weapon), but also in part because, over the years, they have resigned themselves to the creeping judicial and technocratic imperialism pursued at home by the EU Court of Justice and the EU Commission.

If, against all odds, the European public has a more positive image of the UN than of NATO, it is for a simple reason: When it comes to strategic communication, today's NATO is your grandfather's NATO. Meanwhile, over the years, the UN has turned itself into a slick, global propaganda machine.

In that respect, the UN's main achievement since 1949 has been the transformation of a once-peripheral issue into a global Passion Play. Though the number of refugees throughout the world were millions after 1945 (and 15 million more with the partition of India and Pakistan in 1947), the UN decided to focus quasi-exclusively on the 700,000 refugees of the 1948 Israeli-Arab war. For these Palestinian Arabs, the UN created not only a specific agency (UNRWA) but a unique, and Orwellian, definition of "refugees" carefully designed to maintain the issue forever alive.35

Twenty years later came a new development. The demagogic UNESCO projects about a New World Information and Communication Order did not disappear when the US and the UK left the organization in protest and UNESCO, as a result, lost one fourth of its budget. The NWICO project was simply quietly transferred from Paris to New York, from UNESCO headquarters to UN headquarters. Over the years, the UN-New York developed its radio and TV station and its global network of 60 centers. It has provided "training" to Third World journalists (with a particular predilection for Palestinians) and built both a formal and informal media empire on which the sun never sets. By 1998, the UN spent a greater share of its budget on self-promotion and propaganda through its Department of Public Information (5.37 percent) than on Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs (4.96 percent) or International Justice and Law (2.10 percent).

At the same time that it was becoming a major player in the propaganda game, the UN inside was gradually turning into a "lawfare" machine against the West. As Joshua Muravchik explains: "In the General Assembly, the Arabs have a unique leverage with which they can make the UN say whatever they want (except in the Security Council where the US veto has prevented that). The 22-nation Arab League constitutes a decisive bloc within the 56-nation Organization of the Islamic Conference [OIC], which is decisive in turn in the 115-nation Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), which constitute nearly two-thirds of the UN and is the organization's main bloc."

The OIC, it will be remembered, was created by Saudi Arabia in 1969 as a weapon against the Egypt-led Arab League in the ongoing Arab Cold Wars. In recent years, under the leadership of the OIC, the UN has turned into UN-istan:

The OIC is silent on putting the blame for the slaughter of innocent Muslim pilgrims precisely where it belongs -- on other Muslims. Instead, the OIC squanders most of its energy condemning the West for defaming Islam whenever terrorism is in any way linked with adherents of their religion. . . . While as a group they pay less than 3 percent of the regular annual budget of the United Nations, they have managed to exercise an outsized amount of influence in the General Assembly and its subsidiary bodies over how the UN deals with such issues as Palestine, terrorism and human rights and terrorism. Next on their agenda is a permanent Islam seat on the Security Council. Iran has already been designated as the OIC's preferred candidate for election to the Security Council in 2008. . . . In short, the Organization of the Islamic Conference bloc has been able to manipulate the UN's machinery to turn the liberal vocabulary of racism, oppression, genocide, tolerance and multiculturalism against the critics of reactionary Islam.

How delusional is the OIC today? So delusional that, at its May 2007 summit, the 56 foreign ministers agreed that the "greatest form of terrorism" in the world today is -- Islamophobia! The same OIC is the main force behind the election of Iran as vice-chairman of the Disarmament Commission, the presence of representatives of the worst dictatorship on the planet in the UN Human Rights Committee, not to mention the attempt, following the Danish cartoon affair, to make the UN recognize "blasphemy" as a crime.

In this ongoing weaponization of the UN against the West, China has not remained passive: beyond the OIC and NAM proper, the largest group in the UN happens to be the "G-77 + China," i.e., 132 countries representing 69 percent of UN members. China's UN dues may be 2 percent of the UN budget, but Chinese activism in the past decade has spectacularly increased in recent years.36 It is reportedly under Chinese pressure that the US was evicted from the Human Rights Commission in 2001 to make room for Arab dictatorships.

While the UN was sinking in global parochialism, NATO has gone global geographically (50,000 troops deployed now on three continents) and functionally (broadening of political consultations in the NAC). It is also beginning to go global in its cooperation with non-Atlantic partners like Japan to Australia.

In some American and European quarters, this globalization of NATO has led some observers to assert rather boldly that "NATO's next move must be to open its membership to any democratic state in the world that is willing and able to contribute to the fulfillment of NATO's new responsibilities."37 But to add four or five global partners is one thing, to add the 88 countries recognized as democracies by Freedom House is quite another. The necessary, if not sufficient, condition for turning NATO into a UN of democracies would be to change the flawed images of the UN and NATO that European publics currently have. That said, this long-term scenario of NATO as a UN of democracies cannot be ruled out given the ongoing deconstruction of the Tower of Babble by China and the OIC.

With the possible emergence of a NATO Security Providers Forum consisting of the leading contributors, three key questions are likely to keep the Allies busy in the coming years. What would happen with the four NATO Partners who are also SCO members in the event the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council was to be disbanded in favor of a Security Providers Forum. What will be the nature of the articulation between the North Atlantic Council, the Security Providers Forum, and the NATO-Russia Council? Has the time come for NATO to adopt an EU-style, "variable geometry" decision-making process? At the same time, the debate on the future Global NATO should not be limited to these organizational matters.

The Western-inspired international legal order is today under assault at the UN; at the same time, an obsolete Law of Armed Conflict is preventing the West from defending itself on the ground. As a military organization, NATO should today articulate a "Counter-Lawfare" doctrine for the sake of intellectual interoperability. As a security organization, NATO should not wait until it has become a full-fledged UN of Democracies to start elaborating a New Law of Armed Conflict adapted to the realities of post-modern warfare.38 Last but not least, the Alliance should take strategic communication more seriously and make better use of the NATO Parliamentary Assembly (information) and the NATO Defense College (education).

If the Atlantic alliance is to genuinely "go global," it will have to achieve a better balance between "toolbox" and "think tank" and to focus more than has been the case so far on increased strategic literacy, broader situational awareness, and state-of-the art strategic communication.

History on the move again

Two hundred years ago, Napoleon Bonaparte, who knew a thing or two about epochal change, remarked: "When China awakens, the world will tremble." China is awakening, all right, and promoting worldwide authoritarianism all the more successfully that the spectacle of Western democracies lately has not been exactly edifying. If the Chinese promotion of "Asian values" has a global, rather than regional, historical significance, it is because Confucius today speaks with a very strong German accent: that of Carl Schmitt. While Western pundits were enrolling Kojève for their musing on the "end of history," the Chinese were translating nine books by Schmitt to philosophically buttress their return in history. The future of liberal authoritarianism has never looked brighter.39

The return of China alone would be enough to make the West "live in interesting times." To make things even more interesting, Islam too is back, this time in the form of a totalitarianism which manages to combine an ideological comprehensiveness (Salafism) unseen since Communism and an existential nihilism (jihadism) worthy of Nazism. A generation ago, the post-Vatican II Catholic world finally espoused the 20th century, and the Church went on to play a critical role in the collapse of communism; meanwhile, under the increasing influence of Wahhabism, the Muslim world was going in the opposite direction, and this great leap backward brought them back to the 14th century.40 If the Saudi caliphate does not soon undertake its own Vatican II, chances are the Muslim world will never make it back to the 21st century.

It is time for the Transatlantic chattering class to realize that there is a time for problematizing, and a time for strategizing -- and that its first order of business should be to stop mistaking a simple transatlantic time lag for a metaphysical problem. In the wake of 9/11, there was an extreme disconnect between an America that had just experienced its first continental aggression since the "second war of independence" (the war of 1812) and a Europe convinced that the then-imminent opening of the Brussels constitutional convention was, if not the beginning of universal peace, at least the world's most important event since the Philadelphia Convention of 1787.

Hence the temptation in certain quarters to reify this temporary disconnect into a Mars/Venus gap. But the most cursory examination of twentieth-century history shows that transatlantic time lags have always been the rule rather than the exception. The First World War began in 1914, the U.S. only joined in 1917. The Second World War began in 1939, the U.S. only joined in 1942. The Cold War began in 1947, and it took Europe a full two years to give up the temptation of neutrality and side with the U.S. Since the Long War is of an asymmetric kind, it is no surprise if it took longer than usual for America and Europe to synchronize their chronopolitica

          Weekly catch-up   
Supreme Court agrees to review “travel ban” cases and partially stays injunctions on the ban pending a final decision. The Trump Administration won a partial victory this week when the U.S. Supreme Court decided that portions of the preliminary injunctions against the “travel ban” issued in March should be stayed. What that means is that the travel ban is now in effect for foreign nationals from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen who do not have bona fide close family relationships with persons in the United States or bona fide pre-existing, documented relationships with entities (such as schools or employers) in the United States. The decision is only preliminary. The case will be heard by the Supreme Court during the first session of its October term. Will Krasnow of our Immigration Practice Group tells us what this means for employers. The May-June Executive Labor Summary is out! Once again, David Phippen has outdone…
          The First Asteroid We Knew Would Hit Earth in Advance   
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On October 7, 2008, at quarter-to-six in the morning, commuters waiting for the train at Station 6 in Nubia, Sudan, were greeted to a spectacular display: a massive fireball that streaked through the sky overhead and quickly disappeared.

It seems safe to say that they were surprised. Elsewhere in the world, though, astronomers had been expecting it. This was 2008-TC3—the first asteroid scientists had ever spotted in time to predict its arrival, a feat that hasn't been repeated since.

"It's the only case where an object was discovered in space, before it struck the earth," says Richard Binzel, an asteroid expert and a professor of planetary sciences at MIT. Although Binzel was not directly involved with the effort to track 2008-TC3, he watched it play out in real time, along with much of the rest of the international astronomy community.

As Emily Lakdawalla of the Planetary Society reported soon afterward, it all started on October 6, about twenty minutes before midnight, when the University of Arizona researcher Richard Kowalski "discovered an object… that appeared to be on a collision course with Earth." The object, then called 8TA9D69, was soon spotted by other observatories in Arizona and Australia. They all called in reports to the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center, a NASA-funded group that's in charge of keeping track of the various B-list rocks whirling around our solar system.

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The MPC gave the asteroid a more formal, and slightly catchier, name: 2008-TC3. They then set out to get its story straight, and to tell everyone about it. The asteroid was 88 tons, about as heavy as a blue whale, and had a 13-foot diameter, the same as a large trampoline. It posed no danger to Earthlings, as it would almost certainly not survive its passage through the atmosphere.

The next eleven hours was a game of long-distance cat and mouse. "Astronomers around the world scrambled to their telescopes," Lakdawalla wrote. Those who successfully spotted the asteroid submitted their observations to the MPC, which continued to refine its orbit, and thus to tighten predictions about exactly where and when it would hit.

Eventually, they made the final call: it was heading for the Nubian Desert in Sudan, and would enter the atmosphere there at 5:45:28 a.m. local time, give or take fifteen seconds. Different scientists kept an eye on it until 4:40 a.m. Sudan time, at which point the asteroid disappeared into Earth's shadow. Its last hour of approach was shrouded in darkness.

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At that point, everyone who had been watching the asteroid hunkered down and waited for it to get here. The Center for Astrophysics put out a press release about the new arrival—which, they wrote, would appear as "an extremely bright fireball traveling rapidly across the sky." The United States also tried to give Sudan a heads up: "There was an attempt to call the embassy in Sudan and say that this event is going to happen," says Binzel. "But it was the middle of the night, and no one answered the phone." One meteorologist, Jacob Kuiper, dialed Air France, and suggested they radio their nearby pilots so that they could keep an eye out.

The impact time came and went. Now, the astronomers faced another needle-in-haystack problem: how to figure out whether their predictions had come true. Satellite images helped them pinpoint the impact spot. An earthquake detector in Kenya picked up the blast the asteroid made as it came through the atmosphere, which verified the time.

Eyewitness reports came in from the people at the train station, as well as one Air France pilot who had been flying over Chad. And although they didn't expect to find any physical traces—it was thought the asteroid would vaporize completely—a team of students and staff from the University of Khartoum went out to search the desert for space rocks.

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Sure enough, they ended up discovering 15 meteorites—pebble-sized, jet-black, and "fresh-looking," as the resulting scientific paper put it. Follow-up trips increased the total haul to 280. These were the first rocks ever discovered that could be directly linked to a particular asteroid observed in space, and subsequent analysis of them has helped scientists begin to trace where asteroids come from.

Thanks to real-time international teamwork, astronomers had been able to turn Kowalski's single initial observation into a kind of scientific comet-streak: a 12-hour rush of useful predictions, followed by a long, elegant tail of unique discoveries. Overall, NASA later declared, "the system worked well for the first predicted impact by a near-Earth object."

Encouraging—especially since it will definitely not be the last. "A house-sized object flies in between the earth and the moon at least weekly," says Binzel. "The objects are going to be there no mater what, it's just a question of whether we see them in advance."


          South Sudan Deports Three US Citizens Who Served in Military   
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          OFAC impone multa a aseguradora AIG por violar embargo a Cuba, Irán y Sudán   
OFAC impone multa a aseguradora AIG por violar embargo a Cuba, Irán y Sudán
junio 29, 2017

Un comunicado de OFAC expresa que las violaciones de AIG concernientes a
Cuba se refieren a coberturas de seguros para envíos de mercancías desde
o hacia la isla, en 29 ocasiones, con un costo total de $3,679 dólares.
La Oficina de Control de Activos Extranjeros (OFAC, por sus siglas en
inglés) impuso una multa de $148,698 dólares a la compañía
estadounidense de seguros American Internacional Group (AIG) por violar
las sanciones económicas a Irán, Sudán y Cuba.

Un comunicado de OFAC expresa que las violaciones de AIG concernientes a
Cuba se refieren a coberturas de seguros para envíos de mercancías desde
o hacia la isla, en 29 ocasiones, con un costo total de $3,679 dólares.

AIG con sede en New York, reconoció voluntariamente que había cometido
555 violaciones aparentes a las sanciones económicas en vigor a Irán,
Sudán y Cuba, impuestas por Estados Unidos, dijo el comunicado.

Desde el 20 de noviembre de 2007, hasta el 3 de septiembre de 2012, AIG
incurrió en esas violaciones, al proveer cobertura de seguros a varios
envíos de mercancías hacia o desde esos tres países.

Esta es la tercera multa que OFAC impone en lo que va de año a empresas
o entidades estadounidenses por violar las sanciones a Cuba.

El pasado 8 de junio, una subsidiaria en Canadá de la empresa American
Honda Finance Corporation pagó una multa de $87,255 dólares para
liquidar su posible responsabilidad civil por aparentes violaciones al
embargo estadounidense a Cuba.

OFAC impuso la multa a esa compañía por financiar 13 acuerdos de
arrendamiento de vehículos a la Embajada cubana en Ottawa entre el 2011
y el 2014.

El 12 de enero, la Alianza para una Política Responsable hacia Cuba, con
sede en Tampa, acordó con OFAC pagar $10,000 dólares por violar los
reglamentos del organismo durante múltiples viajes no autorizados a
Cuba, entre el 23 de agosto del 2010 y septiembre del 2011.

(Redactado por Pablo Alfonso, con información de OFAC)

Source: OFAC impone multa a aseguradora AIG por violar embargo a Cuba,
Irán y Sudán -
https://www.martinoticias.com/a/ofac-mpone-multa-a-aseguradora-aig-violar-embargo-cuba-iran-sudan-/147873.html
          The Collective Nº5   
Contact sheet of Sudanese super model Grace Bol for The Collective Nº5, the amazing magazine created by designer Osman Yousefzada.
             
Italia
I cani a caccia dello straniero
La Repubblica
(Maurizio Crosetti) Un gioco dell' oca, ma le pedine sono esseri umani. La prima casella è sotto il ponte della ferrovia, sul greto del torrente Roja dove domenica notte sono partiti in 400 e sembrava un esodo biblico, poveri corpi trascinati tra sassi e immondizie nell' oscurità calante, in mano bastoni e borse di plastica. Muti, spaventati, a mollo fino alle ginocchia e poi sulla montagna subito dopo il guado, cercando i sentieri che portano in Francia. All' orizzonte la massa illusoria e lugubre del Monte Grammondo, verso il passo Treittore dove un cippo indica che qui finisce l' Italia ma non comincia niente.
La prima casella sono i loculi di cemento scavati dentro i piloni del ponte, un metro e mezzo per un metro, buchi immondi dove i migranti sudanesi, etiopi, libici e gambiani trascorrono le notti come rifiuti in fondo alla discarica. E infatti si fatica a distinguere la presenza umana di corpi avvoltolati nelle coperte, dentro un sonno di pietra, dal ciarpame rovesciato sulle sponde del torrente. Ma quando cala il buio si parte e si sale, seguendo le tracce dei giovani attivisti tedeschi oppure dei passeur che per cento euro a cranio conducono sugli antichi sentieri della sopravvivenza: così li chiamavano in tempo di guerra quando sulla Mortola fuggivano gli ebrei nella boscaglia, pure loro in cerca di futuro. 
Sono le stesse piste dei miseri contrabbandieri di olio e farina in cambio di caffè e cioccolata, quando ancora non si barattava una vita con una vita, o con nulla. Sono saliti in quattrocento e un centinaio ancora mancano all' appello, sperduti tra carpini e lecci, dentro i cespugli fioriti. Hanno mangiato piccoli fichi ancora acerbi salendo verso Olivetta San Michele, hanno raggiunto il rifugio Gambino in frazione Gerri tra un volo di farfalle bianche e il sangue delle vesciche. Molti avanzano in ciabatte, altri scalzi, seguendo il rumore del torrente Bevera per orientarsi nelle tenebre, e il volo dei gabbiani. 
Alcuni si sono divisi tra le frazioni Calvo e Torri: i più agili o fortunati ce l' hanno fatta, conquistando finalmente la Francia con l' ultimo salto nel buio, ma i più sono stati catturati dalla Gendarmerie e rimandati indietro. Perché la seconda casella è il respingimento, anche la parola è orribile, non solo il fatto. Li identificano e li respingono appunto uno a uno, una procedura molto lunga e per arrivarci i migranti sono stati presi con i cani Malinois e con i droni, dove l' elicottero non riusciva ad arrivare. «Il lavoro sporco, i nostri poliziotti lo fanno fare ai francesi», dice un' attivista italiana col foglio di via, fuorilegge sul monte per aiutare dei poveracci. Tutti illegali, lei e loro. «La Polizia ha fatto crescere la tensione per poter reprimere meglio, è un vecchio trucco tattico». Poi, la terza casella è l' intruppamento verso Sospel o Castellar, frazioni francesi sopra Ventimiglia da dove il mare è una meraviglia finta, di smalto. 
I gendarmi non usano troppe cortesie. «Mi hanno picchiato quando ho detto che ho solo 17 anni, eppure è vero, mi hanno battuto e rimandato indietro», racconta Ahammed, etiope col sogno di un Paese che neppure lo conosce e già lo odia. La quarta casella del gioco dell' oca umano è il fax dai gendarmi francesi ai colleghi italiani, ci sono meno di 200 metri tra le loro caserme alla frontiera alta di Ponte San Luigi, gialle e basse entrambe, dove gli uomini sono stivati dentro ai container come merce. Dalla caserma italiana partono le camionette per riprendersi i migranti e riportarli sotto, sul greto del torrente. Ma i più vengono messi sui pullman e spediti al Cie di Taranto, i sedili sono coperti da teli di plastica perché si sa che i neri sono sporchi e un vecchio torpedone scassato senza aria condizionata potrebbe subirne grave danno. La quinta casella è dunque il viaggio infinito, torrido e sconsolante, con un' idea già ben chiara in testa: arrivare in Puglia e scappare di nuovo. Molti dei neri portati a Taranto martedì ieri pomeriggio erano già a Milano e aspettavano il treno per Ventimiglia dove il gioco dell' oca ricomincerà. «Ora sono stremato, nel bosco non ho mangiato niente e non ho dormito, ma tra qualche giorno ritento» dice Mido, sudanese. «Ho 17 anni», lo ripete come tanti, sperando che il diritto internazionale che gli hanno a malapena spiegato ne tuteli la minore età, altra pia illusione come dimostrano le percosse sulla schiena di Ahammed. Quelli che tornano al via, si rifocillano alla mensa della Caritas di via San Secondo. 
Ieri mattina erano 250. «Ma non possiamo sfamarne neppure uno di più, la struttura è al collasso», racconta Christian Papini, il coordinatore di queste due file di uomini affamati e malvestiti. «Chiediamo abiti da uomo di taglia piccola perché i ragazzi, vedete, sono mingherlini». Il cibo per ora non manca. Menù del giorno, pasta ai funghi e insalata. La roba da mangiare arriva anche dalla Francia, come questa latta d' olio che la signora Thérèse Maffeis scarica adesso dall' auto. «Vengo da Nizza e mi vergogno che noi francesi non accogliamo nessuno, altro che europeismo di Macron, lui non vuole chi non gli rende nulla». Thérèse veste solo di verde: «Per una speranza, e per dare un po' di colore e gioia a questi poveretti che già mi conoscono e mi chiamano, appunto, la verde». Davanti alla chiesa delle Gianchette che ospita donne e bambini, i migranti maschi stanno distesi a terra e cercano la forza di ripartire. Sanno che cento di loro vagano ancora sulla montagna, nel frattempo qualcuno sarà passato dall' altra parte, scappando ai cani e ingoiando bacche. Perché la montagna ha una strada per tutti, almeno finché un gendarme non ti cattura dopo che hai pagato i trafficanti di uomini, non solo quelli delle carrette del mare, anche i contrabbandieri di carne che conoscono ogni angolo del monte, luridi e scaltri perché il gioco dell' oca è soprattutto un mercato e loro comprano, loro vendono. E stanotte qualcuno riproverà.

          Children worst affected by the S Sudan conflict   
According to the United Nations Refugee agency (UNHCR), more than one million children have now fled the conflict in South Sudan including some 160,000 refugee children in the Bidibidi refugee settlement in northern Uganda. More than 5,000 are believed to have crossed South Sudan’s borders alone, or were separated from their families along the way. […]
          Changing The Lives Of Disabled People In South Sudan: The Real Impact Of The Humanitarian Disability Charter   
Aleema Shivji in South Sudan

Nine years since I was last here, I'm back in South Sudan, the world's newest nation. Part of the work I am doing here, with our team, is to implement the Charter on Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action in our emergency response in the country.

May 2017 marked the first anniversary of the Charter. This anniversary was the occasion to increase UK mainstream NGOs support for the Charter and to show how vital it is for organisations and states to endorse it.

Handicap International plays an important role in urging organisations to endorse the Charter. For this first anniversary, with CBM UK, we organised a special event attended by 45 humanitarian actors at Westminster, in partnership with the UK Department for International Development. Five organisations endorsed the Charter during the event.

The Director of DFID's Conflict, Humanitarian and Security Department (CHASE), Beverley Warmington, chaired the event and reiterated the UK Government's commitment to push the rights of disabled people and make sure no one is left behind in areas of armed conflict or disasters.

As a charity uniquely specialised in supporting people with disability living in crises, Handicap International also has to ensure the commitments made are turned into concrete action. This is why we are also helping the endorsing organisations on the ground to implement the Charter. And this is part of what we are doing here, in South Sudan.

I know that the Charter on Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action may seem a little bit abstract in the eyes of many living far away from crises. This is why I want to take the opportunity of my mission in South Sudan to share my experience and show why it is so important for organisations to sign the Charter and the vital change it is making in the lives of people with disability living in crises.

South Sudan is a nation affected by conflict and a food crisis. Over 3.7 million people are displaced either inside South Sudan or to neighbouring countries due to conflict, starvation or a combination of the two. 5.5 million people are food insecure. At the same time, the government is working hard to build this nation.

So while Handicap International's teams are responding to the immense needs caused by the conflict and the food crisis, we are also working alongside the government and local civil society to ensure people with disabilities can achieve their rights and have access to sustainable services when peace returns to South Sudan.

I spent one of my mornings with our outreach team working in camps across Juba, the capital city. These camps house tens of thousands of people that have fled their homes due to hunger, conflict or in search for services that are only available in the capital city.

Chang, in Juba, South SUdan

Meet Chang. He was severely beaten by a group of youths last year, and was paralysed from the waist down. He spent a year in the hospital in the camp we visited this morning, and it was there that our local outreach team met him. John, our rehabilitation worker, initially provided Chang with rehabilitation while in hospital. Today, our team continues to support Chang in the tent he calls home, with psychosocial support to overcome the trauma he has faced, and rehabilitation to make him stronger.

Mary, South Sudan



This is Mary, she can barely see due to severe visual impairment. During the day, Mary is able to get around the camp with the white cane our local team has given her, but at night, due to the uneven and narrow pathways, she is reliant on a caregiver to help her do even basic things like go to the toilet in the communal latrines on the other side of the camp. This dependency on others is very isolating, so our local psychosocial worker visits her regularly to help break the cycle of loneliness and ensure she has access to essential services like referrals to the local health centre when she recently had some health problems.

Vulnerable people face many challenges in South Sudan.

I heard horror stories about disabled people being left behind when their families fled the fighting. John, a man with polio, told me he told his family to flee without him, as he was worried the whole family would be targeted by the fighters if they had to slow down for him to keep up.

In the camps and in the community - the threat of gender-based violence is constant, uneven and narrow pathways make it difficult for people with mobility or visual problems to move around, latrines are inaccessible. Information about services isn't always communicated in such a way for people who can't hear to get the messages, families are separated and many people are traumatised by their experiences.

In addition to our work in Juba, our flying team of specialists travels far and wide across South Sudan to respond to urgent needs of the most vulnerable people.

Handicap International, through a network of local community mobilisers, rehabilitation specialists and counsellors, identifies vulnerable people, provides direct services such as rehabilitation and psychosocial support, refers people to other actors for other services such as support to survivors of rape, access to food rations and health services, and works with other actors to make their services and facilities more inclusive and accessible. We've started to make progress, but there is so much more to be done!

The Charter on Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action has the potential to end a great injustice for disabled people. People with disabilities need to be included in planning and delivering humanitarian aid.

We will continue to work tirelessly to ensure the Charter is put into practice and that no one is left behind in humanitarian crises.

(Some names in this article have been changed)
All images © Handicap International

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          Hawaii Files Federal Court Challenge to Trump’s Latest Travel Ban   

As the newest, scaled-back version of the Trump administration’s Muslim ban went into effect Thursday evening, the state of Hawaii filed an emergency motion over its implementation and the White House’s interpretation of a Supreme Court ruling earlier this week. The Supreme Court stipulated that individuals from the six banned Muslim-majority countries that have “bona fide” relationships in the U.S. cannot be prohibited from entering the country. The State Department, however, very narrowly defined what relationships would be sufficient for individuals from Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya, Iran, and Yemen to be granted visas—namely, a spouse, sibling, parent or child (including daughters and sons-in-law and stepchildren). Excluded from consideration, however, are other close relatives: grandparents, grandchildren, uncles, aunts, cousins and fiancés.

The state of Hawaii on Thursday asked a federal judge to again halt the enforcement of the ban because, lawyers for the state argue, the government’s ban too narrowly interpreted what constituted a “bona fide” relationship in Supreme Court’s ruling. “A few hours ago, after days of stonewalling plaintiffs’ repeated requests for information, the government announced that it intended to violate the Supreme Court’s instruction,” Hawaii said in a filing Thursday in Honolulu federal court. “It will apply the executive order to exclude a host of aliens with a ‘close familial relationship” to U.S. persons, including grandparents and grandchildren, brothers- and sisters-in-law, fiancés, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.”


          Donald Trump’s State Department Is Acknowledging the Virtual Impotence of His Muslim Ban   

In response to the Supreme Court’s ruling earlier this week, Donald Trump’s State Department sent a cable to the United States’ diplomatic posts explaining how officials should implement the president’s Muslim travel ban. The administration’s new guidance pushes the court-sanctioned implementation to be as restrictive as possible. It was also issued in secret, which means the administration is doing its damnedest to prevent the legal challenges that will surely follow. The guidance makes clear, though, that this version of the travel ban will not affect nearly as many of people as the original ban did, nor will it be as severe as the second version of the ban would have been had the court allowed it to go into full effect.

On Monday, the Supreme Court limited the ban to individuals who do not have a connection to a U.S. entity or a “close familial relationship” with a person in the United States. That vague description—the court cited only the example of a relationship with a mother-in-law and spouse—allowed the State Department to craft its own rules. What they came up with is the most limited plausible definition that falls within those boundaries. From the State Department’s guidance:

“Close family” is defined as a parent (including parent-in-law), spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, sibling, whether whole or half. This includes step relationships. “Close family” does not include grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-laws and sisters-in-law, fiancés, and any other “extended” family members.

The agency acknowledges at another point in the guidance that most non-immigrant visas are exempt from review under the travel ban because “their bona fide relationship to a person or entity is inherent in the visa classification.” Familial relationships are also often required for immigrant visas; there are special visa categories for spouses, parents, and siblings that will also be exempted from the travel ban based on this new guidance.

Who isn’t exempt from the travel ban?

What’s left, it seems are a small number of visas that visitors from the six countries in question—Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen—don’t even use that often: independent media visas for those without a U.S. business connection (I visas), crewmen visas for air and sea companies that don’t have some U.S. connection (C-1 and D visas), tourist visas (B visas), fiancée visas (K visas), and refugee travel documents.

It’s these last three categories that will affect the most people and face the most significant legal challenge. Say an Iranian woman wants to visit her American granddaughter in California on a tourist visa. Under this guidance she would be blocked. It seems possible that a court could decide a grandmother does in fact have a “close” familial relationship with her granddaughter. It’s also possible, though, that a judge could decide that the government drew within the lines. “I could see courts providing a lot of leeway to the agency to make that [familial] determination through the doctrines of deference to agency decisionmaking,” Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor of immigration and constitutional law at Santa Clara University School of Law, told me via email.

Gulasekaram does think the government might run into trouble with its decision to exclude fiancées. An entire visa category, K-1, already exists for people who are engaged to be married. There’s no sound rationale for excluding them while including in-laws, who don’t have their own such visa category. “I'm not sure why that makes sense, and certainly is something I would predict could and would be litigated,” Gulasekaram wrote. “It may not affect a huge number of people, but it’s an odd way to draw a line.”

One final point: I wrote earlier this week that the administration might attempt to hide behind the doctrine of consular nonreviewability in order to obscure its decisionmaking around the issuance of individual visas. This State Department guidance—although it was not issued publicly—is a tacit acknowledgement that there are now official guidelines in place regarding what does and doesn’t qualify as a close family relationship. Gulasekaram said this guidance could allow the courts to review decisions that might otherwise have been hidden—a district judge might issue a ruling on whether the State Department’s interpretation of “close” family relationship is in fact the correct one. If courts decide a grandmother should get the same treatment as a mother-in-law, then Trump’s feeble travel ban could become completely impotent.


          Why Nikki Haley Is Gloating Over Cuts to Peacekeeping Funding   

Nikki Haley looks awfully pleased with herself here:

The ambassador is referring to a deal reached Wednesday, after weeks of negotiation between the U.N. and the Trump administration, to cut the U.N. Peacekeeping budget from $7.87 billion to $7.3 billion for the coming year. U.N. Blue Helmets are currently deployed in 16 operations around the world, though the missions in Haiti and the Ivory Coast are expected to wrap up soon. Under U.S. pressure, the U.N. voted to scale down the peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo in March and is expected to do the same for the program in Sudan’s Darfur region later his week.

The U.S. provides more than 28 percent of the funding for the program, and the Trump administration had originally sought a $1 billion overall cut to the program and to cap U.S. contributions at 25 percent.

These may sound like big numbers, but the amount of savings being passed on the U.S. taxpayer here—it will shake out to about $125 million per year assuming the U.S. continues to pick up a quarter of the budget—are minuscule compared with our defense programs. A single B-2 stealth bomber, most of which are currently not operational, cost $2 billion when the Pentagon requisitioned the warplanes in the 1980s.

And as economist Charles Kenny wrote in January when these cuts were first discussed, peacekeeping is pretty cost-effective, as seen in places from Kosovo to Sierra Leone, to Guatemala. One study found that a deployment of peacekeepers to a country reduces the likelihood of a civil war reigniting there by almost 70 percent. Fewer civil wars around the world means fewer refugees and less ungoverned territory for groups like al-Qaida and ISIS to operate in. Compared with the ongoing U.S. military engagements in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria, the peacekeeping program is a bargain.

To be sure, the U.N.’s program is harder to defend after recent appalling incidents. Nepalese peacekeepers introduced a cholera epidemic to Haiti that has killed more than 10,000 people and continues to sicken Haitians today. There have been hundreds of allegations of sexual abuse by peacekeepers in a number of countries, most notably in Haiti and the Central African Republic. The U.N., under former Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon, was shamefully slow to acknowledge responsibility for these problems, and the U.N. still hasn’t done enough to compensate the victims or punish the wrongdoers. More fundamentally, foreign peacekeepers, usually living in fortified compounds and traveling in 4x4s, are often disliked and distrusted in the countries where they are deployed. Haitians disdainfully refer to the local U.N. mission, known by the French acronym MINUSTAH, as “TURISTAH.”

Haley has raised these issues as part of her overall critique of the peacekeeping program. Given Trump’s general view of the U.N. as a waste of money, it seems likely that the administration would be pushing for these cuts even if every operation were conducted flawlessly and peacekeepers were a paragon of virtue and professionalism. But the U.N. itself deserves some blame for the fact that such a vital program has become such an easy target.


          Four More Surveys Join the MICS4 Programme   
Iraq, Sudan, Morocco, and Kazakhstan are now confirmed to conduct surveys as part of the MICS4 programme. All of these surveys are at present scheduled to start data collection in 2010.

The addition of these surveys brings the total number to 24.
          CRÓNICA DE LA PRESENTACIÓN DE CAFÉ CON LETRAS   

Faltaban diez minutos para las siete y apreté el paso por la calle Pelayo. Dejé de mirar el reloj cuando llegué a las Ramblas, y enfilé por Santa Anna. A lo lejos se divisaba el Portal del Ángel; en la esquina El Corte Inglés donde tendría lugar la presentación de «Café con letras», la nueva antología de relatos del Aula de Escritores. Nada más cruzar la puerta, un cartel lo anunciaba en la entrada. Sexta planta. Y allá que nos fuimos. Antes de entrar a la sala de Ámbito Cultural, compré los ejemplares preceptivos para repartir entre amigos y familiares. Aún quedaban algunas sillas libres, pero duraron poco.
La mesa sobre el pedestal estaba sin ocupar aún, las botellas de agua llenas y las copas vacías; los micrófonos alineados.
Cuando se aproximaba el momento de levantar el telón, había gente apostada en cualquier rincón de la sala.
Todo sitio era bueno, aunque hubiese que aguantar cincuenta minutos de pie, sudando la gota gorda porque en aquel lugar y en aquel momento no parecía que fuera treinta de enero, o hubiese delante una columna que impidiese una vista completa de la escena, como era mi caso.






Gemma Solsona, como presentadora del acto y autora de relatos incluidos en la antología del Aula de Escritores, Rodrigo Díaz Cortés y Dolores Ferrer, voces experimentadas en el oficio de escribir que acumulan obras propias que han visto la luz o han sido galardonadas en certámenes, tomaron asiento, y la gente comenzó a guardar silencio hasta que los murmullos también se callaron. Abrió fuego Gemma, dando la bienvenida a los presentes y también a los que no habían podido asistir.



Le cedió la palabra a Lluc Berga, editor de la antología, que agradeció a todos los autores y profesores que con su trabajo han contribuido a que «Café con Letras» se convirtiera en libro.


Gemma continuó explicando el porqué del título y el tipo de relatos que podían encontrarse en éste. A partir de entonces fue guiando el coloquio entre Dolores y Rodrigo a través de preguntas sobre literatura, y sobre el género del relato corto en particular. Se lanzaba una cuestión, y los tres se cedían la palabra alternativamente para dar sus opiniones. Rodrigo adoptó la postura desenfadada pero técnica. Dolores opinó haciendo uso de símiles con la cotidianeidad y evocando una visión onírica. Y todos aportamos un granito de humor al debate.






Así pasamos un rato asintiendo con la cabeza o mostrándonos en desacuerdo, hasta que para dar muestra de lo que en el libro podía encontrarse, algunos de los autores leyeron para el público fragmentos.
Miguel Viola leyó un microrrelato de Xavi Lorente, el que abre «Café con letras», de título Golpe de suerte.



Luego, Lucas Pellitta y Joan Tort interpretaron un diálogo, escrito por Lucas para la ocasión, emulando a Don Quijote y Sancho.



Tebu Guerra leyó un trozo del libro «Firmin», en el que una taza de café adquiría el protagonismo.



Y para finalizar, Rosa Mª Hontoria y Luis Merlo recitaron un diálogo, emulando a una pareja que discutía con sarcasmo e ironía.



Finalmente se llamó a los autores a aquella especie de escenario para posar, que quedaran para la posteridad. Confieso que me costó levantarme de la silla, y sólo me asomé tímidamente a la avalancha de flashes.
Familiares y amigos captaban instantáneas, y el toque profesional lo aportaron Antonio Funes y Carlos Martín (Fotoensayos), para inmortalizar esa tarde en imágenes. Para filmarla, y de tal modo dejar constancia latente de cuanto ocurrió en la sala de ámbito cultural, Ramon Pla se puso la cámara al hombro y se convirtió en un testigo más para hacer llegar la presentación de «Café con letras», la antología del aula de escritores, a todos los que no pudieron estar allí.






La sala se fue desalojando, y en la sección de papelería en que nos hallamos al volver a la realidad se congregó el personal para comentar cómo había estado la jugada.
Algunos espontáneos pidieron a los que habían identificado como autores que les firmaran el ejemplar de «Café con letras» que acababan de comprar.





De ahí marchamos a «El Caliu», en el barrio de Gràcia. Esto y lo que vino después pertenece al secreto de sumario de los que allí estuvimos.


Galería de fotos

           Periodistas de Sudán del Sur y Uganda forman una red para informar de la situación de los refugiados    
Varios grupos de periodistas de Sudán del Sur y Uganda han formado la red Cross Border Network para informar de la situación de los refugiados sursudaneses en Uganda, así como de las comunidades de acogida y de los desplazados a nivel interno.
          06/30 Links Pt1: Abbas's Lies and Palestinian Child Victims; UN hosts hatefest comparing Israelis to ISIS   
From Ian:

Major (res.) Eyal Harel, don’t blame the system
[This was NOT translated from the Hebrew edition to the English one at Haaretz (Which is fake news by omission) - Guess why. (h/t Yenta Press)]
An IDF officer answers claims by a fellow (Breaking The Silence) officer: My name is Eran Ben Yaakov, and I am a major in reserve duty. Eyal Harel has served under my command in most of the incidents he describes ("What Really Happens in the World's Most Moral Army", Haaretz,June 19). He was a platoon commander in the engineering company in which I served as deputy commander. In the absence of the company’s commander, I was also the de facto commander of Girit outpost during a large part of the period in question. Later I was appointed commander of the company, and Harel was my deputy during the Second Lebanon War in 2006. Overall, we served together in reserve duty for nearly a decade. I read Harel’s words with sorrow, not only because he distorts the truth, but also because he does so in order to portray himself as a victim, full of regret and yet not responsible for his own actions. But this is not the case. I know him to be a good, virtuous and disciplined person.
But, in my opinion, his decisions as a commander weren’t always the best, and it angers me that he blames the system.
Regarding the incident in which a body appeared at Gaza’s shore near Rafah (an Egyptian soldier murdered [in Egypt] drifted to the shore), I was next to Harel when he fired into the air in order to drive the crowd away. I didn’t give him the order. He
did it of his own volition, and I scolded him for it was unnecessary. I wasn’t present at the second incident, but according to soldiers who were there, that was an unneeded shooting as well. No one pushed him into this. (h/t Yenta Press)
Abbas's Lies and Palestinian Child Victims
Hamas and human rights groups hold Abbas personally responsible for the deaths of the children and the possible deaths of other patients in need of urgent medical treatment not available in Gaza Strip hospitals. One human rights group went so far as to call for the International Criminal Court in The Hague to launch an investigation against Abbas.
In a move of mind-bending irony, we are witnessing a Palestinian president waging war not only against Hamas, but also against the two million Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip -- while Israel continues to provide the Palestinians living under Hamas with humanitarian aid.
That is the standard operating procedure of the man who lied straight to the face of President Donald Trump, by claiming that he had stopped incitement against Israel and was promoting a "culture of peace" among his people. Will the last sick Palestinian child please stand up?
PA to again allow Gazan patients to be treated in Israeli hospitals
The Palestinian Authority will reportedly once again allow patients from the Gaza Strip to be treated in Israel after three babies died on Tuesday in the enclave controlled by the Hamas terror group.
Following an international outcry over the deaths, the Palestinian Health Ministry will on Sunday increase the number of permits it issues for Gaza residents to receive medical care in Israel, the Haaretz newspaper reported on Friday.
The Palestinian Authority has severely cut back on medical aid to the Gaza Strip as part of a series of tough measures aimed at forcing Hamas to cede control of the coastal enclave, including reducing the amount of electricity it provides the Strip and slashing PA salaries to Gaza residents.
The Hamas-run Gaza Health Ministry blamed the Palestinian Authority for the deaths of the three babies, all less than a year old, saying Ramallah has refused to grant permits for them to be treated in Israel.
To leave Gaza and travel to Israel for medical treatment, or to receive treatment in the West Bank or abroad, Gazans must first get confirmation from the PA that it will pay for the treatments.



The UNRWA Problem
UNRWA, created in the aftermath of Israel's existential victory in the 1948 war, was formed with modest and sensible goals - to provide emergency aid to all needy refugees of that war with an eye to gradually decreasing the need for aid through job creation, resettlement and regional cooperation. In the early days of UNRWA, it operated inside Israel, and aid recipients included Jewish refugees of the war who had previously lived in areas conquered by Jordan and Egypt. Israel quickly absorbed its internally displaced Arab and Jewish refugees, taking them off UNRWA's rolls.
Then UNRWA became an advocacy organization for the political goals of Palestinian Arabs and expanded its definition of Palestinian refugee identity to include all the descendants of the original refugees. UNRWA's mandate to resettle these refugees was removed in 1965, formalizing a perpetual state of Palestinian dependency on the organization.
UNRWA's institutionalized perpetuation of Palestinian refugee camps and culture makes peacemaking more difficult and deprives generations of Palestinians who were not refugees themselves the right to choose their own destiny. It does so at an unsustainable level for the mostly Western countries that financially support the organization.
JCPA: Lessons from Israel's Response to Terrorism
Amb. Dore Gold: Is the Terror against Europe Different from the Terror against Israel?
Effective solidarity among states has become a prerequisite for ultimately succeeding in the war of the West against jihadist terrorism. Yet, in the aftermath of the Islamic State’s brutal attacks in Paris during 2015 that left 129 dead, there began a discussion in the international media of whether the terrorist attacks against Israelis could be compared with the newest jihadist assault on European capitals. Recent events have challenged this European distinction. A cohesive military strategy is needed for the West, the Arab states that are threatened, and Israel. It stands to reason that, just as all three face similar threats, the models developed in Israel for dealing with terror merit attention in Europe and beyond.
Fiamma Nirenstein: Resilience, the Israeli People’s Weapon against Terror
An important component of Israel’s struggle against terrorism is its population’s psychology, resilience, and capacity to counter what has unfortunately been one of the characteristics of this state from its very origins: the constant attacks against civilians in the streets, public structures, cafes, and buses. How do the Israeli people overcome being on the front line against terror? The answer lies in Israel’s history, sociology, education, and social values, from which today’s vulnerable Europe can learn much.
Brig-Gen. (res.) Yossi Kuperwasser: The National Security Aspect of Fighting Terror – The Israeli Experience
Israel’s overall strategy of fighting terror is a comprehensive approach that was developed out of ongoing learning efforts. Understanding the goals and strategy of the enemy and the context in which it operates, and being agile enough to rapidly adopt adequate responses that build on former solutions, enabled Israel to become a world leader in the fight against terror.
Lessons from Israel's Response to Terrorism



Democratic lawmakers urge Tillerson to stop Israeli trial
Thirty-two Democratic members of Congress have urged the secretary of state to help an Arab activist who is going on trial in Israel.
In a letter sent Wednesday, the lawmakers asked Rex Tillerson to utilize his influence in the case of Issa Amro, who is facing charges connected to protests he organized in Hevron.
US Reps. Keith Ellison and Betty McCollum, both of Minnesota, Earl Blumenauer of Oregon, and Mark Pocan of Wisconsin circulated the letter organized by the U.S. Campaign for Palestinian Rights, CODEPINK, Jewish Voice for Peace and American Muslims for Palestine.
Amro will appear July 9 in a military court to face 18 charges, most dating back to 2013, that include “spitting at a settler, obstructing soldiers and insulting them, and entering closed military zones,” Haaretz reported. An Israeli military spokesman described his actions as “disturbances,” but did not claim his protests are violent.
“After evidence of these offenses was collected, the indictment was served,” the spokesman said.
According to the congressional letter, Amro has been recognized by the United Nations and the European Union as a human rights defender for his organization, Youth Against Settlements. The UN and Amnesty International have condemned the case against him.
The letter questioned whether Amro would be judged fairly in the Israeli judicial system. (h/t Jewess)
UN trumpets Palestinian revisionist fraud: all of Israel is Palestinian, no to a Jewish state.
His remarks were made at a forum organized by the U.N.'s Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, which was created to implement the 1975 General Assembly "Zionism is racism" resolution.
Said Palestinian representative Erekat: "I'm the son of Jericho. I'm 10,000 years a son of the Natufians. We were there 5,500 years before Isho ben Nun came to my home town, Jericho. That's the truth. This is my narrative....So when Mr. Netanyahu says you must recognize Israel as a Jewish state, he is telling me hey, change your narrative. That's what he's doing. He's turning this conflict into a religious conflict...Call it Islamic state, Jewish state, that should be a forbidden zone..."
Erekat's hate-filled UN-sponsored diatribe also included classic antisemitism, blaming money-grubbing Jews for the regions' ills.
In his words: "So I think a question that I would like to see answered or a general opinion is, is the Jewish religion being exploited for economic gains by a key elite segment within Israeli society? And are they the ones that are driving this conflict..."
All of the proceedings were webcast around the world - courtesy of taxpayers everywhere, including Americans.
Man blinded in terror attack to speak at UN against PA terrorist stipends
Oren Almog, who lost five members of his family along with his eyesight in a terrorist attack at the Maxim restaurant in Haifa in 2003, where 21 died and 51 were wounded, will speak at the UN Security Council next month as part of the Israeli government's struggle against the Palestinian Authority's payments to convicted terrorists.
Almog will travel to the UN Security Council at the initiative of Israel's ambassador to the United Nations, Danny Danon, and in cooperation with the pro-Israel advocacy organization StandWithUs.
"Those responsible for the murder of my family receive a monthly payment from the PA," Almog told Yedioth Ahronoth. "The Palestinian leadership speaks to the world about peace, but pays the terrorists and their families. This is explicit support for the murder of innocents. I will come to the UN and call upon the international community to act to stop this funding and to prevent future terror attacks."
The Maxim restaurant suicide bombing was perpetrated by Hanadi Jaradat, who blew herself up in as an act of revenge after Israel Defense Forces undercover operatives in Jenin killed her cousin and her younger brother, both of whom were members of Islamic Jihad, with her cousin being a senior member of the Al-Quds Brigades group.
Report: Palestinian Authority has ceased paying 500 terrorists
Researcher Bushara al-Tawil, who specializes in the subject of Palestinian Arab prisoners, told Hamas newspaper Palestin that the Palestinian Authority had ceased paying salaries to 500 prisoners.
"We need a real intifada, of all the freed prisoners. They need their salaries," al-Tawil said.
According to her, the Palestinian Authority has a large budget intended for its prisoners, but decided to slash the budget in accordance with its new and changing guidelines.
According to Abdullah Abu Shalbak, spokesman for the demonstrating ex-prisoners who claims to have spent 21 years in Israeli jails,, the Palestinian Authority ceased paying monthly salaries to 277 prisoners, including 23 who are currently in Judea, Samaria, or abroad, and 48 who were released in the "Shalit deal" and later recaptured by Israel.
Freed terrorists who no longer receive their monthly salaries protested this week in the center of Ramallah, setting up a protest tent in the city's "Hasha'on Square." One of the claims is that Fatah convicts continued to receive payments, with only Hamas and Islamic Jihad members losing their stipends.
UN hosts hatefest comparing Israelis to ISIS
At an anti-Israel U.N. "Forum to Mark 50 Years of Occupation" on June 29, 2017, an invited Palestinian official equated the "Jewish State", with ISIS, the "Islamic State." Saeb Erekat, a Palestinian representative and top negotiator, made the remarks during the opening of an extraordinary two-day UN-sponsored Israel-bashing event.
In Erekat's words:
"There are two ways combined to defeat ISIS. One is ending the Israeli occupation that began in 1967...Ending the Israeli occupation is a must, is a responsibility for the international community. And the logic of some of those who argue that why should Israel make peace, it has 5,000 tanks, it has 3,000 fighting planes and nuclear weapons, Congress, Senate, and Nikki Haley to defend them justly or unjustly. And then these people stand to speak about defeating ISIS. Enough. Enough."
Hamas and PFLP Are ‘Not Terrorist Organizations,’ Top Palestinian Official Claims at UN Anti-Israel Forum
A senior PLO official and former negotiator with Israel went before a UN forum on Thursday to emphatically deny that Hamas and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) were terror groups.
“Hamas and the PFLP are not terrorist organizations,” Saeb Erekat — the PLO’s secretary-general and a principal negotiator of the 1993 Oslo Accords with Israel — declared.
“We are a people who strive to achieve our independence — and our choice in the PLO, the Palestine Liberation Organization, is to achieve peace peacefully,” Erekat went on to say in a speech given on the opening day of a two-day UN conference “to mark 50 years of occupation.”
Indicating that Palestinian enthusiasm for US President Donald Trump’s bid to revive direct talks between Israel and the Palestinian Authority (PA) was quickly diminishing, Erekat — who spoke to the forum as a representative of the “State of Palestine” — asserted, “We do not have a partner in Israel today. ”
“The Israeli government, headed by Mr. Benjamin Netanyahu, is trying to replace the two-state solution with ‘one state, two systems’ apartheid,” Erekat said, invoking one of the most persistent themes of anti-Israel propaganda: that the Jewish state legally discriminates against Palestinians in the same manner as the former white supremacist regime in South Africa.
Other speakers at the first day of the conference — titled “Ending the Occupation: The Path to Independence, Justice and Peace for Palestine” — included Nabil Elaraby, a former secretary-general of the Arab League, Aida Touma-Sliman, a member of the Knesset from the anti-Zionist “Joint List,” and Nasser al-Kidwa, a former PLO foreign minister.
Israel’s Opposition Aids Delegitimizers
The very fact that the left-wing opposition can continuously castigate the current coalition with impunity without any real fear of retribution arguably most resoundingly repudiates the repeated accusations of “fascism.”
What self-respecting fascist regime would tolerate such recalcitrant behavior? The perpetrators would have long been dispatched, post haste, to either prison or the hereafter.
Surely the time has come for the left-wing opposition to realize that their reckless rhetoric inflicts tremendous and unwarranted harm on their country; surely the time has come for them to desist from this egregious tactic for electoral advantage, especially as it has proven so hopelessly ineffectual.
In this regard, perhaps the Left would do well to recall that is has always prided itself on its acceptance of the “The Other.”
So, in its quest for greater success in the democratic process, perhaps it’s time for the representatives of the Israeli Left to come to terms with the existence of “The Other” and reconcile itself with the idea that people who think differently to them are just as legitimate as those who look different to them.
Indian prime minister to meet massacre survivor Moshe Holtzberg
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will visit Israel next week for an historical visit, during which he will meet Moshe Holtzberg, the young boy who miraculously survived a terror attack and massacre in 2008.
Modi's 3-day trip will mark the first time an Indian prime minister visits Israel.
Moshe's parents were killed in the attack, and his nanny Sandra miraculously managed to escape the besieged building holding Moshe in her arms. After the attack, Sandra brought Moshe to Israel and was granted Israeli citizenship.
Four other Jews were killed in the attack.
According to Yediot Aharonot, Modi is expected to meet Holtzberg, his grandparents, and Sandra in the Tel Aviv Convention Center.
Israel awarded highest ranking for combating human trafficking
For the sixth year in a row, the U.S. State Department has named Israel a Tier 1 country in combatting human trafficking for its efforts to identify and rescue trafficking victims and punish traffickers.
Since 2001, the State Department has assigned countries to one of four tiers in its annual report, based on their government efforts to put a stop to trafficking in persons. Until 2012, the State Department ranked Israel a Tier 2 nation in its annual report on the fight against human trafficking. A Tier 2 ranking indicates a country that does not meet the minimum standards of combating human trafficking but is making efforts to do so. Israel became a Tier 1 country in June 2012.
In a statement, Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked said that "the Justice Ministry is leading the government's activity on the issue. We will continue to act so that the phenomenon of modern-day slavery disappears from our region."
In a step that could aggravate tensions between Washington and Beijing, which have eased under U.S. President Donald Trump, China was downgraded to the State Department's global list of the worst offenders in human trafficking and forced labor.
State Dept. Sanctions 4 of 6 Nations in Trump Travel Ban for Child Soldiers, Child Sex Slaves
The U.S. Department of State’s 2017 Trafficking in Persons Report singles out eight nations for specifically trafficking children for purposes ranging from training and arming them as soldiers to servants and sex slaves. This designation brings sanctions to those countries on certain security assistance and commercial licensing of military equipment.
The list and sanctions, congressionally mandated by the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008, apply on Oct. 1, 2016, and for fiscal year 2018 for the following countries: Democratic Republic of Congo, Mali, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.
Four of these nations – Somalia, Syria, Sudan, and Yemen – are on the list of nations in President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration seeking to limit and closely screen individuals coming into the United States from these countries. Their governments are either unwilling or unable to properly vet individuals for ties to terrorism before leaving the country. The other two countries on Trump’s travel list are Libya and Iran.
“The term ‘child soldier’ includes any person… who is serving in any capacity, including in a support role, such as a ‘cook, porter, messenger, medic, guard, or sex slave,’” the trafficking report states.
This applies to individuals under 18 for all trafficking of children and children under 15 used as child soldiers.
GOOD TRUMP: Administration Cuts Funds For U.N. Peacekeeping
The Trump administration is making good on a promise to hold the increasingly corrupt United Nations accountable. Early Thursday, U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley put to rest any suggestions that the White House was bluffing when it said it would cut funds to the international body.
“Just 5 months into our time here, we've cut over half a billion [dollars] from the UN peacekeeping budget and we’re only getting started,” she tweeted.
The post “left many on social media bewildered,” according to The Hill.
As The Daily Wire reported, Trump has long promised a day of reckoning for the despots, theocrats, and charlatans at the U.N.
After the Obama administration’s shameful encouragement of the international body’s staunchly anti-Israel agenda, Trump called for a more serious review of the U.N.’s so-called “peacekeeping” work.
In his first month in office, Trump signed an executive order asking for “at least a 40% overall decrease” in U.S. funding for the U.N. organizations that violate certain criteria. One such criterion was whether a given U.N. body recognizes full membership to the Palestinian Liberation Organization and the Palestinian Authority, Islamist-inspired political projects accused of promoting terrorism and violence against Jews.
JPost Editorial: Keep your promise
According to NGO Monitor, Al-Haq is not the only Palestinian nonprofit that has ties to the PFLP. Others include Addameer, the Alternative Information Center, Defense for Children International – Palestine, the Health Work Committee, Stop the Wall, the Palestine Center for Human Rights, and the Union of Agricultural Work Committees.
Jewish Voice for Peace, another group that took part together with Al-Haq in the UN forum, organized a 2017 National Member Meeting in April that featured Rasmea Odeh, a PFLP operative convicted of US immigration fraud after concealing her role in two terrorist bombings in Israel.
Slightly more surprising was the participation of former foreign minister Shlomo Ben-Ami, Joint List MK Aida Touma- Sliman and executive director of B’Tselem Hagai El-Ad.
How can we take these individuals’ calls for justice seriously when their ideological bedfellows are members of an organization that is willing to use suicide bombings and coldblooded attacks on civilians – including stabbing to death babies and little children as they sleep – to further their goals? The same question must be asked of NGOs that collaborate with Hamas, which like PFLP is considered a terrorist organization by the US, Canada, the EU and Israel.
In April, during a speech to delegates at the World Jewish Congress’s plenary assembly while Israel marked Holocaust Remembrance Day, the UN secretary-general said that he would be “on the front lines in the fight against antisemitism,” and promised to “make sure the UN is able to conduct all possible actions for antisemitism to be... eradicated from the face of the earth.” Guterres added that “a modern form of antisemitism is the denial of the right of the State of Israel to exist.”
It is time for Guterres to keep his promise.
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to Visit Israel in August
United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres will visit Israel in August for his first trip to the Jewish state since assuming the leadership of the world body at the start of this year.
Guterres will meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Reuven Rivlin, receive briefings from senior security officials, and visit Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust remembrance center.
Israeli Ambassador to the UN Danny Danon, who will accompany Guterres during the visit, said he was “looking forward to showing [Guterres] the true Israel, which is an island of prosperity and stability in the tumultuous Middle East.”
“Particularly because of the UN’s discriminating treatment of Israel, it’s important for the secretary-general to see the complex challenges Israel is dealing with up close, along with its great contribution to the world as an innovative and groundbreaking country in many fields,” Danon added, Yedioth Ahronoth reported.
U.S. Aircraft Carrier to Visit Israel for First Time in 17 Years
A United States aircraft carrier is slated to dock in an Israeli port for the first time in 17 years on Saturday.
The USS George H. W. Bush, named for the World War II naval aviator and 41st U.S. president, is scheduled to arrive in Haifa for a four day stopover with a crew of about 5,700 sailors and pilots and some 90 planes, Haaretz reported. The crew will spend the Fourth of July in Israel.
Because of its massive size, the George H. W. Bush will be unable to dock at Haifa’s port, but will remain offshore. Ferries will transport the crew to land.
The carrier, a Nimitz class nuclear-powered vessel, was deployed to the Persian Gulf to serve as a base for air strikes against the Islamic State in Syria.
On a visit to Israel in April, U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis said that Washington “maintains absolute and unwavering commitment to Israel’s security.”
Israeli plane hits Syrian army after shell lands in Golan
An Israeli warplane struck a Syrian army post on Friday, hours after stray fire from Syria’s civil war hit the Israeli Golan Heights, in the 16th such spillover just this week, the IDF said.
“In response to the projectile launched earlier today at Israel from Syria, an Israel Air Force aircraft targeted the Syrian army position that fired the mortar,” the English-language Israeli statement said.
“The errant projectile was a result of internal fighting in Syria.”
No one was hurt and no damage was reported in the incident. IDF forces located the shell casing near the border fence not far from Quneitra.
Rebels recently launched an offensive against government forces in Quneitra on the Syrian side of the armistice line.
Syrian rebels near Golan ask world for support against 'Assad’s terrorist regime'
Syrian rebels who have been fighting against the Syrian regime of Bashar Assad near Quneitra on the Golan claim to have killed 108 Syrian army soldiers in recent clashes, including high ranking officers.
In an exclusive interview with The Jerusalem Post, the spokesman Abo Omar Algolany said Syrian rebel factions were still trying to liberate Quneitra province.
Over the weekend of June 24th fighting between Syrian rebels and Assad’s forces led to projectiles falling on the Israeli side of the border and Israel struck Syrian regime tanks in response. According to Algolany a number of “revolutionary factions” that are active near the Golan border formed a unified “operations room” under the name “Operations of the Army of Muhammed” and launched an attack dubbed “there is no God but you, O God” to push Assad’s forces out of the Quneitra area. “The regime forces shell civilian homes, villages and towns adjacent to the Golan heights,” said Algolany. His statements correspond with other information online that says five different rebel groups cooperated in the attacks last week against an area called “Ba’ath city” which is around one kilometer from the Israeli border and near the ruins of the old town of Quneitra. This area can be easily seen from the Israeli side.
The Syrian rebels are facing reinforcements from Hezbollah as well as “Iranian Shi’ite militias” that prop-up Assad’s forces in the area, according to the source. “The rebels managed to control the first defensive lines of the Assad militia in Ba’ath City and eastern Samadaniyah, which is located near the city. They killed 108 members of the Assad regime, including high ranking officers. They destroyed three tanks.” Video posted on twitter claims to show the successes of the battle.
UN tells Syrian forces to leave buffer zone on border with Israel
The UN Security Council on Thursday strongly condemned fighting in the buffer zone between Syria and Israel and urged the Syrian government and opposition groups to withdraw from the area which is patrolled by UN peacekeepers.
A resolution sponsored by Russia and the United States and adopted unanimously Thursday by the UN Security Council extends the mandate of the peacekeeping mission known as UNDOF until Dececember 31.
Israel captured the Golan Heights from Syria in the 1967 Mideast war and later extended civil law over the strategic plateau overlooking northern Israel, in a move that is not internationally recognized.
The United Nations Disengagement Observer Force has patrolled the buffer zone between Syria and Israel since 1974, a year after the 1973 Yom Kippur War. For nearly four decades UNDOF helped enforce a stable truce between the two countries but the Syrian war spilled into the zone.
The six-year conflict has not only seen some intense fighting in the buffer zone but the abduction of peacekeepers by al-Qaeda-linked anti-Syrian government militants, and other attacks that prompted several countries to withdraw their soldiers.
Sarin nerve gas used in deadly Syria attack, says chemical weapons watchdog
An investigation by the international chemical weapons watchdog confirmed Friday that sarin nerve gas was used in a deadly April 4 attack on a Syrian town, the latest confirmation of chemical weapons use in Syria’s civil war.
The attack on Khan Sheikhoun in Syria’s Idlib province left more than 90 people dead, including women and children, and sparked outrage around the world as photos and video of the aftermath, including quivering children dying on camera, were widely broadcast.
“I strongly condemn this atrocity, which wholly contradicts the norms enshrined in the Chemical Weapons Convention,” Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons Director-General Ahmet Uzumcu said in a statement. “The perpetrators of this horrific attack must be held accountable for their crimes.”
The investigation did not apportion blame. Its findings will be used by a joint United Nations-OPCW investigation team to assess who was responsible.
The OPCW scheduled a meeting of its Executive Council July 5 to discuss the findings.
The US State Department said in a statement issued Thursday night after the report was circulated to OPCW member states that “The facts reflect a despicable and highly dangerous record of chemical weapons use by the Assad regime.”
Hamas Official: Trump Administration Seeking to Establish ‘Palestinian Entity,’ Not an ‘Independent State’
The US is seeking to establish a “Palestinian entity,” not an “independent state,” a top Hamas official claimed this week, the Hebrew news site nrg reported.
Furthermore, Moussa Abu Marzouk — the deputy chairman of the Hamas political bureau — asserted that the Trump administration’s nascent Israeli-Palestinian peace initiative was meant to “serve Jewish interests.”
“American policy is pushing for the implementation of a confederation plan with Jordan and Egypt,” Marzouk tweeted.
Marzouk’s statements came a week after top Trump administration officials Jared Kushner and Jason Greenblatt met with Palestinian Authority (PA) President Mahmoud Abbas in Ramallah.
That meeting, nrg said, left PA officials pessimistic, feeling that the Trump administration was biased in favor of Israel.
Abbas — according to PA officials quoted by nrg — tried to raise issues such as borders and refugees, while the American officials were focused on the PA’s payments to terrorists and their families and its incitement against Israel.
No understandings were reached and the discussion reached a dead end, nrg reported.
PreOccupiedTerritory: Palestinian Teachers Fear Students’ Murderous Hate For Jews Will Atrophy Over Summer (satire)
Educators in the Palestinian Authority school system and in the parallel institutions run by the United nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees voiced concern this week over the impending two-month summer break from formal studies, during which the hard work they invested inculcating in the children vengeful animosity toward Jews might dissipate.
With the school year reaching its formal completion this Friday, teachers and other staff members at schools across the Palestinian Territories expressed anxiety over how successful they had been at instilling lasting Jew-hate in their students during the last ten months. Summer camps will provide some of the same treatment to the children during July and August in informal settings, but the educators can only hope the hard work they have put into growing the next generation of stabbers, bombers, vehicular homicide perpetrators, hijackers, and inciters to murder does not go to waste once their young charges leave behind the school walls for the summer.
“I know summer camp can provide some of that content, but I still worry,” admitted Jenin sixth-grade teacher Sobbi Bor. “When the kids move up to seventh grade in September, will they retain the same level of murderous ill will, or will their new teachers have to go over some of the ground I was supposed to cover, just to get them up to speed? It’s a real worry of mine – basically, was I good enough? Am I good enough?”
For veteran Palestinian educators, the feelings are all too familiar. “Man, not a year goes by that I don’t dread the summer for this reason,” concurred Mustafa Massikr, who teaches fourth grade in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah. “It doesn’t get any easier. My mind fills up with visions of the children losing what I’ve tried to teach them, and actually starting to see Jews as human, or at least deserving of compassion or respect. Only through mindfulness training have I managed to overcome those nightmares and push forward.”
Five suicide bombers attack Lebanese army during raids
Five suicide bombers attacked Lebanese soldiers as they raided two Syrian refugee camps in the Arsal area at the border with Syria on Friday and a sixth militant threw a hand grenade at a patrol, the army said.
The army said seven soldiers were wounded and a girl was killed after one of the suicide bombers blew himself up in the midst of a family of refugees. It did not elaborate.
The raids were part of a major security sweep by the army in an area that has been a flashpoint for violent spillover from the Syria crisis, and several Islamic State officials were among some 350 people detained, a security source said.
The defense minister was quoted as saying the incident showed the importance of tackling the refugee crisis - Lebanon is hosting over 1 million refugees - and vindicated a policy of "pre-emptive strikes" against militant sleeper cells.
US accuses UN of failing to address Iran’s ‘repeated’ flouting of nuclear deal
The United States on Thursday accused Iran of “repeatedly and deliberately” violating a UN resolution that endorsed the landmark 2015 nuclear deal and said the Security Council had failed to respond.
US Ambassador Nikki Haley pointed to “repeated ballistic missile launches, proven arms smuggling,” purchases of missile technology and a violations of a travel ban on Iranian military officials as proof that Iran was not upholding its international obligations.
“The Security Council has failed to take even minimal steps to respond to these violations,” Haley told a council meeting called to discuss Iran.
“These measures are here for a reason. This council should be here to enforce them,” she said.
The Security Council adopted resolution 2231 two years ago to endorse the nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers, lifting economic sanctions in exchange for curbs to Tehran’s nuclear program.
The resolution called on Iran not to test ballistic missiles capable of carrying a nuclear warhead and an arms embargo remained in place.
US set to seize NYC skyscraper whose owner violated Iran sanctions
The US government said it’s ready to seize a Manhattan skyscraper from an Iranian-American charity after a jury found Thursday that the charity’s majority ownership was derived from financial dealings that violated sanctions against Iran.
Acting US Attorney Joon H. Kim said the owners of the office tower near Rockefeller Center “gave the Iranian government a critical foothold in the very heart of Manhattan through which Iran successfully circumvented US economic sanctions.”
“For over a decade, hiding in plain sight, this 36-story Manhattan office tower secretly served as a front for the Iranian government and as a gateway for millions of dollars to be funneled to Iran in clear violation of US sanctions laws,” Kim said in a statement. “In this trial, 650 Fifth Avenue’s secret was laid bare for all to see, and today’s jury verdict affirms what we have been alleging since 2008.”




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          Re: gambia   
Agree with you regarding Gambia,you should also include other Islamic countries in Africa such as Senegal,Mali,Mauritania,Sudan. These are places to be avoided at all costs,they are extremely intolerant of gays,and risk your life,just for a few minutes of fun. No amount of money or any other incentive would ever lure me to visit such barbaric countries.
          Re: How many times you had sex in one day ?   
My friend Evita, well known activist of sexual liberation, tells me that in one night she was fucked by 20 University students from Egypt and Sudan. She was in a sea-side hotel on vacation when the group came to stay for the night . The following day they would travel by air to their countries. She met them in the bar of the hotel. They became friends. They consumed together some bottles of alcoholic drinks and they swimmed in the pool. After that she went to her room, where she was accepting them in her bed one by one. Before 9 a.m.next morning all 20 students had fucked her.
          South Sudan: National Consultancy: Behavioural Study on Determinants of Use/ Non-use of Family Planning (via Reliefweb)   
UNFPA: South Sudan: National Consultancy: Behavioural Study on Determinants of Use/ Non-use of Family Planning (via Reliefweb) in UN Population Fund Country: South Sudan. Closing date: 1970-01-01
          Sudan: International Consultant to provide expertise to support the Action Plan and dialogue with parties to conflict for Six Months (via Reliefweb)   
UNICEF: Sudan: International Consultant to provide expertise to support the Action Plan and dialogue with parties to conflict for Six Months (via Reliefweb) in UN Children's Fund Country: Sudan. Closing date: 1970-01-01
          South Sudan: International Consultancy: Behavioural Study on Determinants of Use/ Non-use of Family Planning (via Reliefweb)   
UNFPA: South Sudan: International Consultancy: Behavioural Study on Determinants of Use/ Non-use of Family Planning (via Reliefweb) in UN Population Fund Country: South Sudan. Closing date: 1970-01-01
          Consultancy ? Developer of a Website and Digital Communications Strategy   
UNDP: Consultancy ? Developer of a Website and Digital Communications Strategy in Home-based/Juba, SOUTH SUDAN. Closing date: 2017-06-30
          Musudan (2016)   
Musudan (2016)

Algunas tropas de élite de Corea del Sur tratando de resolver una cantidad de casos que faltan y la muerte en la frontera entre el Norte y Corea del Sur.


          Osnabrück: Offener Brief der Flüchtlinge in der Limbergkaserne an die Stadt   

In der Osnabrücker Limbergkaserne sind ca. 220 Sudanesen untergebracht, die sich am 29. Juni mit einem Offenen Brief an die Stadt wandten. Sie fordern ein Aufnahme- und Integrationskonzept, um erfolgreich Fortschritt gestalten zu können. Die Stadt sagt: "Wir werden das prüfen".

Der Beitrag Osnabrück: Offener Brief der Flüchtlinge in der Limbergkaserne an die Stadt erschien zuerst auf Online Nachrichten aktuell - Epoch Times (Deutsch).


          Vize yasağı yürürlükte   
Vize yasağı yürürlükte
ABD yönetiminin Suriye, İran, Sudan, Libya, Somali ve Yemen vatandaşları ile tüm mültecilere uygulayacağı vize yasağı kısmen yürürlüğe girdi. ABD’ye vize başvurusu yapanlarda aile veya iş bağları şartı...Devamı için tıklayınız
          Eritrea FM visits Astana in first ever government-level visit of Eritrea representative to Kazakhstan   
Kazakhstan Foreign Minister, H.E. Kairat Abdrakhmanov meeting with his Eritrean counterpart, H.E. Osman Saleh in Astana

By AKIpress

Eritrea's Minister of Foreign Affairs Osman Saleh Mohammed arrived in Astana in a first ever government-level visit of Eritrea representative to Kazakhstan.

FM Mohammed was received by his Kazakh counterpart Kairat Abdrakhmanov. Kazakhstan and Eritrea established diplomatic ties in December 2016.

The Eritrea's FM said he opes this visit will become the beginning of fruitful partnership between the two nations. He also handed over the letter from President of Eritrea Isaias Afwerki addressed to President of Kazakhstan Nursultan Nazarbayev, in which the Eritrean side expressed interest in boosting ties with Kazakhstan.

The parties discussed a wide range of issues of development of bilateral political cooperation, as well as prospects for cooperation in the trade and economic fields.

During the talks, special attention was paid to the issues of cooperation between Kazakhstan and Eritrea within the framework of the United Nations, including in the framework of Kazakhstan's presidency in the UN Security Council's Somalia and Eritrea Monitoring Group.

The Monitoring Group on Somalia was first established by the Council on 16 December 2003 to focus on ongoing arms embargo violations. Subsequently, the Council extended and expanded the mandate of the Monitoring Group on several occasions. After the imposition of the sanctions regime on Eritrea on 23 December 2009, the name of the Monitoring Group was changed to Monitoring Group on Somalia and Eritrea. The Group was preceded by a Panel of Experts, which was established by the Council on 22 July 2002 to generate information on violations of the arms embargo on Somalia with a view toward strengthening it.

Eritrea is a northeast African country on the Red Sea coast. It shares borders with Ethiopia, Sudan and Djibouti. The capital city, Asmara, is known for its Italian colonial buildings, like St. Joseph's Cathedral, as well as art deco structures. Italian, Egyptian and Turkish architecture in Massawa reflect the port city's colorful history. Notable buildings here include St. Mariam Cathedral and the Imperial Palace.

------

Senior delegation on working visit to Kazakhstan

By Shabait

Asmara, 29 June 2017- A senior Eritrean delegation comprising Foreign Minister Osman Saleh, Presidential Advisor Mr. Yemane Gebreab and Ambassador Petros Tsegai are on a working visit to Kazakhstan.

At the meeting the senior Eritrean delegation held with Mr. Kairat Abdrakhnanov, Foreign Minister of Kazakhstan, on 28 June in Astana the two sided reached an agreement to strengthen cooperation in political, diplomatic and economic sectors.

They also reached to understanding on the priority areas of cooperation in the sectors of trade, investment mining as well as agriculture and transportation.

The Eritrean delegation also visited the Astana International Expo 2017.


          Lawyers Set Up Shop At Major Airports Over Trump Travel Ban   
Lawyers Set Up Shop At Major Airports Over Trump Travel Ban
President Donald Trump’s revised temporary travel ban went into effect Thursday. It impacts travelers from Libya, Syria, Iran, Somalia, Yemen and Sudan. Visa applicants in those six Muslim-majority countries will have to prove a relationship with family already in the... Read More
          U.S. Defines Who Can Enter Under Travel Ban   
NBC News | Visa applicants from Iran, Sudan, Syria, Libya, Somalia and Yemen must prove a relationship with family already in the U.S.
          QIPS   
Recent Uploads tagged government QIPS UNMISS MEDIA posted a photo: A young woman looks on while attending s a gathering between local villagers with David Shearer, special representative to the United Nations mission in South Sudan, during a tour of the weapons free zone on the permitter of the UN-House, Protection of Civilians (PoC) site […]
          The Ferka of Naqada, the art of ancient scarves   

In their pursuit to excel, they found out that the exported Sudanese Ferka is originally a traditional ancient textile originating from Naqada. Ferka is made through a wooden hand machine called "noel" that stands in a room called "Hazel", this machine is of Pharoanic origin where dyeing the cotton or silk threads comes prior to neatly pulling it around wheels which then the Ferka artist sits on making an artistic piece with its own unique colors and geometric drawings for a full day before heading to sell it.


          U.S. sets new visa rules for 6 Mideast nations, refugees   

Sudanese activist Tayeb Ibrahim, who had worked to expose Sudanese abuses in the volatile South Kordofan province and hopes to see family living in the U.S. state of Iowa, watches television with his son Mohammed, in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, June 28, 2017. Dozens of Sudanese activists living in Egypt as refugees, many of whom fled fundamentalist Islamic militias and were close to approval for resettlement in the United States, now face legal limbo in Egypt after the Supreme Court partially reinstated President Donald Trump's travel ban.


          30.06.2017 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten   
Trainiere dein Hörverstehen mit den Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Freitag – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei.Bundestag stimmt für die Ehe für alle: Der Bundestag hat in einer historischen Entscheidung der "Ehe für alle" zugestimmt. Die Mehrheit der Abgeordneten sprach sich für eine völlige rechtliche Gleichstellung homosexueller Paare aus. Zunächst hatten die Abgeordneten am Morgen mehrheitlich dafür gestimmt, die Abstimmung auf die Tagesordnung zu setzen. SPD, Grüne und Linke hatten den zusätzlichen Tagesordnungspunkt zusammen gegen die Union durchgesetzt. Als Auslöser der Bundestagsabstimmung gilt eine Aussage von Bundeskanzlerin und CDU-Parteichefin Angela Merkel von Montagabend, sie plädiere für eine Gewissensentscheidung bei dem Thema. Das bedeutet, dass Abgeordnete von der Parteilinie abweichen können. Daraufhin hatte sich die SPD entgegen dem Koalitionsvertrag für eine Abstimmung noch in dieser Woche stark gemacht. Die Kanzlerin selbst sagte, sie habe gegen die Öffnung der Ehe für Homosexuelle gestimmt. Insgesamt stimmten gut drei Viertel der CDU/CSU-Fraktion gegen die völlige Gleichstellung von Schwulen und Lesben bei der Ehe. Geheimdienste wussten von Anschlagsplan in Kabul: Die deutschen Geheimdienste wussten laut einem Medienbericht schon im Januar von Anschlagsplänen auf die deutsche Botschaft in der afghanischen Hauptstadt Kabul. Wie das rbb-Inforadio unter Berufung auf Sicherheitskreise berichtet, war seitdem bekannt, dass ein Anschlag mit einem Tanklastwagen zur Abwasserentsorgung geplant sei. Später habe es weitere Warnungen gegeben. Die deutschen Nachrichtendienste hätten entsprechende Hinweise weitergeleitet. Bei der Explosion in unmittelbarer Nähe der deutschen Botschaft in Kabul waren am 31. Mai 150 Menschen getötet und 450 weitere verletzt worden. Das deutsche Personal in dem Gebäude blieb unverletzt. Nach rbb-Informationen war auch die Sprengladung deutlich größer als bisher bekannt: Während zunächst von etwa 1000 Kilogramm Sprengstoff die Rede war, hätten sich tatsächlich 10.000 Kilogramm in dem Tanklaster befunden. Abgemildertes US-Einreiseverbot tritt in Kraft: In den USA ist ein abgeschwächtes Einreiseverbot für Menschen aus sechs überwiegend muslimisch geprägten Ländern in Kraft getreten. In den kommenden 90 Tagen dürfen Menschen aus dem Iran, Sudan, Syrien, Jemen, Libyen und Somalia, die keine engen Verbindungen in die USA haben, nicht in das Land einreisen. Nach monatelangem Rechtsstreit hatte das Oberste Gericht in Washington das Einreiseverbot von Präsident Donald Trump zugelassen - mit zahlreichen Ausnahmen. Einreisen darf demnach, wer Ehepartner, Eltern, Kinder, Geschwister oder Verlobte in den USA hat. Auch wer dort studiert oder eine US-Aufenthaltsgenehmigung hat, darf weiterhin ins Land. Der Bundesstaat Hawaii hat bereits rechtliche Schritte gegen das Dekret eingeleitet. Eine endgültige Entscheidung darüber soll im Herbst fallen. Zuvor hatten mehrere Gerichte die Einreisesperre aus Diskriminierungsgründen blockiert. May gewinnt Vertrauensabstimmung im britischen Parlament: Die britische Premierministerin Theresa May hat die Vertrauensabstimmung im Unterhaus mit knapper Mehrheit gewonnen. Die Abgeordneten der Konservativen Partei und der nordirischen DUP haben ihr Regierungsprogramm mit 323 Stimmen gebilligt, 309 Parlamentarier stimmten dagegen. Das Votum galt als wichtige Bewährungsprobe für die Minderheitsregierung der Konservativen Partei von May. Die Partei hatte bei der Parlamentswahl vor drei Wochen ihre eigene Mehrheit im britischen Unterhaus eingebüßt. Um eine Schlappe zu verhindern, hatte die Regierung Zugeständnisse gemacht: Wenige Stunden vor der Abstimmung gab sie einer Forderung der Opposition nach, die Kosten für Abtreibungen nordirischer Frauen zu übernehmen. Im verabschiedeten Regierungsprogramm geht es hauptsächlich um den geplanten EU-Austritt Großbritanniens. Weniger Angriffe auf Asylbewerberheime: Die Zahl der Angriffe auf Flüchtlingsunterkünfte in Deutschland ist einem Zeitungsbericht zufolge deutlich gesunken. Für die erste Jahreshälfte habe das Bundeskriminalamt bislang 137 Attacken erfasst, berichtet die "Neue Osnabrücker Zeitung". Dies sei ein Fünftel der Vorfälle des ersten Halbjahres 2016 und liege zugleich unter dem Niveau der ersten sechs Monate 2015, also noch vor Beginn des großen Flüchtlingszustroms nach Deutschland. Dem Bericht zufolge haben 128 der 137 Übergriffe einen rechtsradikalen Hintergrund. Überwiegend habe es sich bei den Attacken um Überfälle und Gewaltdelikte, Sachbeschädigungen und Propagandadelikte gehandelt. Die Polizei habe aber auch zwölf Brandstiftungen und zwei Sprengstoffexplosionen erfasst. DFB-Elf im Confed-Cup-Finale: Die deutsche Fußball-Nationalmannschaft hat das Finale beim Confederations Cup in Russland erreicht. Das junge Team von Bundestrainer Joachim Löw setzte sich in Sotschi mit 4:1 gegen Mexiko durch. Die Tore für Deutschland schossen Leon Goretzka, Timo Werner und Amin Younes. Am Sonntag trifft die DFB-Elf dann im Endspiel in St. Petersburg auf Chile. Mexiko spielt gegen Portugal um den dritten Platz.
          Hawaii Challenges 'Close Family' Definition In Trump's Travel Ban   

Hawaii has filed a challenge to the State Department's implementation of President Donald Trump's travel ban, disputing the administration's guidelines for what relationships to the U.S. are necessary to continue travel to the country.

Hawaii is challenging guidance issued by the State Department on Wednesday that says travelers from the six banned countries must have formal ties or close family relationships with someone or an entity within the U.S. Having familial ties "does not include grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, fiancés, and any other 'extended' family members," the guidance said. (The State Department later said fiancés would, in fact, count as close family.)

In its motion, Hawaii asked a federal judge to clarify that the Trump administration can't enforce those bans.

"The state of Hawaii is entitled to the enforcement of the injunction that it has successfully defended, in large part, up to the Supreme Court — one that protects the State's residents and their loved ones from an illegal and unconstitutional Executive Order," reads the state's motion.

"In Hawaii, 'close family' includes many of the people that the federal government decided on its own to exclude from that definition," said Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin. "Unfortunately, this severely limited definition may be in violation of the Supreme Court ruling."

Trump signed the executive order, which seeks to ban travel to the U.S. for most nationals of six Muslim-majority countries for 90 days and suspend refugee resettlement for 120 days, in March.

The travel ban went into effect Thursday, three days after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled to partially reinstate a watered-down version of it before the court hears arguments on its constitutionality in October.

In its ruling, the Supreme Court specified that the ban could be implemented with the exception of individuals who have "a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United State." The court, however, did not specify what qualifies as a "bona fide" relationship, thus leaving the matter up to State Department interpretation.

In March, Hawaii became the first state to sue to block Trump's second attempt at a travel ban, which included citizens of Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen, all majority-Muslim countries. In its suit, the state said its universities would be hurt by the ban because they would struggle to recruit faculty and students. It also argued that the ban would have a detrimental effect on tourism, critical to the state's economy.

A federal judge in Hawaii sided with the state in a March 15 ruling, placing a nationwide hold on key aspects of the ban hours before they were to take effect. In his ruling, U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson said the ban likely violated the First Amendment's establishment clause forbidding the government from favoring or disfavoring one religion over another.

Any reasonable, objective observer would conclude ... that the stated secular purpose of the Executive Order is, at the very least, secondary to a religious objective of temporarily suspending the entry of Muslims," Watson wrote.

In June, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that ruling, citing the president's tweets.

″[T]he President recently confirmed his assessment that it is the 'countries' that are inherently dangerous, rather than the 180 million individual nationals of those countries who are barred from entry under the President's 'travel ban,'" reads the 9th Circuit ruling.

This is a developing story and has been updated.


          The #NotInMyName Protests Aren't Perfect, But Here's Why Turning Up For One Matters    

Standing at a #NotInMyName protest in Kolkata it was entirely possible to feel hopeful, to feel a surge of solidarity, to feel that if nothing else that there were like-minded people, who felt aghast at recent events, shocked enough to leave their homes on a rain-sodden monsoon afternoon and come together in protest.

It was equally possible to be cynical and wonder whether this would achieve anything at all. Protests like these, a mish-mash of reheated poetry and sterile sermons can feel like preaching to the converted. Many of the usual suspects were in attendance. There was a high degree of overlap with a lit fest crowd. And as with an protest, it quickly became a media scrum every time a celebrity was spotted.

The camera person standing on the chair next to me made the Muslims standing in front turn their placards around to face him so that he could get the "right ambience" – rain soaked men in their kurtas, #NotInMyName placards, and a stage and crowds behind them. The men were afraid their phones would get wet in the rain but an obliging man collected all their phones for safekeeping in a plastic bag so the photo-op could continue.

NotInMyName Protest Across India Against Mob Violence

Someone else at the protest posted on the Facebook group that he left in disgust upon seeing a prominent actor/director speak at the venue – someone he branded an "opportunist" whose very presence reduced everything to a "fashion show".

No one is under any illusion that liberals in India can swing any election other than a poll on Facebook (and perhaps not even that). For that matter neither can conservatives who are fiscal conservatives but want no truck with any social conservative Hindutvawadis.

Many worried even about the title - #NotInMyName. It's a tricky one. Some questioned whether it meant that in effect those attending the protests were merely distancing themselves from the lynch mobs as opposed to stopping them. The slogan we were told comes from the Vietnam War protests in America. (And to underline that Anjan Dutt, filmmaker and singer, sang a bit of Joan Baez as well). For the young college student crowd, that was a moment of sheer bemusement. For the grey-haired in the crowd (and there were many) that was a bit of Yesterday Once More nostalgia.

NotInMyName Protest Across India Against Mob Violence

But in those days America had gone to war against Vietnam officially in the name of the American people. That gave the slogan true relevance. We have borrowed the slogan but the context is different here. The Indian government has not declared war in our name on Muslims or Dalits, at least not officially so. Of course murder is bad and the law must take its course the law minister has said. They even insist they have not declared war on eating beef in this country. Their cattle rules are just about animal cruelty. What is happening is more insidious than the American war in Vietnam and the old slogan fits uneasily in these troubled times.

The government whose ministers rarely bother to even acknowledge the lynchings has indicated clearly that the opinions of civil liberty-types, jholawallas, English-media pundits and intellectuals, simply do not matter. Nothing is being done in their name or not in their name either.

If anything, a friend commented drily, a cow at the protest would have been the most relevant since much of the horror we are seeing today is being perpetrated in the name of the cow.

If anything, a friend commented drily, a cow at the protest would have been the most relevant since much of the horror we are seeing today is being perpetrated in the name of the cow.

Not in My Name Protest in India

That is why it would be wishful thinking to hype these protests as some kind of Arab Spring. Many critics saw insufficient solidarity with Dalits as opposed to Muslims. Still others are worried secular liberals only reacted to the buzzwords of the Hindutva brigade without trying to change the terms of the debate. All of that is worthy of debate and introspection.

But no protest can wait for the perfect rainbow coalition. No protest can wait for consensus on strategy and tactic. Every protest counts because the act of showing up counts. That should never be discounted or belittled especially in this time of Facebook activism.

But no protest can wait for the perfect rainbow coalition. No protest can wait for consensus on strategy and tactic. Every protest counts because the act of showing up counts.

Many who dismiss the protests are angry that the word Lynchistan has come into vogue. Of course it's an exaggeration, a click-bait headline-seeker's shorthand. India is no more Lynchistan than it is Gang-Rape Capital of the world. These are sensational monikers but meant to make us sit up and take notice. Those aggrieved that these #NotInMyName protests are maligning India's good name would do better to save their fire for the lynching that besmirches India's reputation rather than a few protests.

Read the Caravan story about the eye-witness account of what happened in that train compartment and be upset about that rather than the wet placards and poetry of a few thousand rain-soaked people on a monsoon evening.

Yes, soon it will be business as usual. Even as the announcers were reminding the audience about a candlelight vigil, the people behind me were discussing the nearest café options. Yes, much of what was said was just platitudes and earnest homily in a time where too much ugliness has been normalized. We are a cynical lot and it takes too much to move us. Many of those who came to the protest come from places of privilege that feel safe from attacks in unreserved compartments on a train. But they came. That matters.

Many of those who came to the protest come from places of privilege that feel safe from attacks in unreserved compartments on a train. But they came. That matters.

But were they moved?

How old was Junaid? Asked singer Moushumi Bhowmik who had just sung a protest song of Babri Masjid vinage. 16 someone said. 16 she said thoughtfully. And then said "My son is 27". Then she sang old song of Rabindranath Tagore's - Aaj jyotsna raatey shobai gechhey boney. On this moonlit night they have all gone to the forest. An unlikely song for a protest. But then she reminded the audience the poet too had lost his own son way too early.

Then she stopped and said pay attention to the next line.

Aamar e ghor bohu joton korey, dhootey hobey, moochtey hobey morey. (I will have to clean this room of mine with great care, I will have to wipe it with great care). We are all culpable, she said whether it's in our name or not. That is why a protest song written after Babri or 2002 is still relevant. We have allowed it to come to this pass.

As she sang, finally someone behind me started singing under his breath and one more person and then another. And for that moment, the sound of honking buses and shrieking ambulances receded and only the protest shimmered, fragile, ephemeral, even wishful but a protest nonetheless.


          US Issues New Visa Criteria For 6 Muslim Nations, Family Or Business Ties Must To Enter Country   

WASHINGTON -- Visa applicants from six Muslim-majority countries must have a close U.S. family relationship or formal ties to a U.S. entity to be admitted to the United States under guidance distributed by the U.S. State Department on Wednesday.

The guidance defined a close familial relationship as being a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling, including step-siblings and other stepfamily relations, according to a copy of a cable distributed to all U.S. diplomatic posts and seen by Reuters.

The cable, first reported by the Associated Press, said close family "does not include grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-laws and sisters-in-law, fiances, and any other 'extended' family members."

It also specified that any relationship with a U.S. entity "must be formal, documented, and formed in the ordinary course, rather than for the purpose of evading the E.O.," a reference to U.S. President Donald Trump's March 6 executive order barring most U.S. travel by citizens of the six nations for 90 days.

The cable provides advice to U.S. consular officers on how to interpret Monday's Supreme Court ruling that allowed parts of the executive order, which had been blocked by the courts, to be implemented while the highest U.S. court considers the matter.

The six nations whose citizens are covered by the executive order are Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.

Asked about the guidance issued on Wednesday night, the State Department declined to comment on internal communications.

The cable's language closely mirrored the Supreme Court's order on the travel ban, though it appeared to interpret it in a narrow manner, notably in its definition of close family.

It was unclear on Wednesday evening whether the State Department's interpretation of the court's order would spark further legal action by opponents of the ban.

The guidance gave several examples of what might constitute a bona fide relationship with a U.S. entity, and said broad categories would be exempt from the travel ban, such as those eligible for student visas, "as their bona fide relationship to a person or entity is inherent in the visa classification."

Similarly, those eligible for family or employment-based immigrant visa applications are exempt from the travel ban, the cable said.

The cable said "a worker who accepted an offer of employment from a company in the United States or a lecturer invited to address an audience in the United States would be exempt" from the travel ban, but someone who simply made a hotel reservation would not count as someone with a bona fide relationship.

Trump's executive order also imposed a 120-day ban on entry to the United States by refugees. Monday's Supreme Court order, however, said the ban did not cover those refugees "who can credibly claim a bona fide relationship with a person or entity" in the United States.

The State Department guidance was unclear on what U.S. refugee agencies regard as a key question: whether their own dealings with refugees applying to come to the United States constituted a bona fide relationship.

The cable said that consulates should continue to interview applicants for so-called diversity visas, which are granted to individuals from countries that typically do not send many immigrants to the United States. In 2015, around 10,500 citizens from the six banned countries were selected for the diversity visa lottery, according to State Department figures.

The travel ban will likely bar such visas for citizens of the six countries, the cable acknowledged, stating that "we anticipate that very few DV applicants are likely to be exempt from the E.O.'s suspension of entry or to qualify for a waiver."

Also on HuffPost India:


          Islam’s Reformation In The Sudan   
As Sudan began to craft a new idea of itself in the mid-20th Century –- one that required gaining independence from Great Britain -– one man was creating a new idea of Islam.

          Crowded hospitals and mothers in need: A male midwife on delivering babies in South Sudan   
Joseph Deng is one of the people helping thanks to a UN program for which Canada is the largest donor
          SLAF sends first replacement aviation unit under UN mission to South Sudan   
The first replacement group of the Sri Lanka Air Force (SLAF) Aviation Unit under the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS) left the country on Tuesday (27th June), Air Force media said. The group of 56 SLAF personnel departed the country from the Bandaranaike International Airport for the annual changing of first group personnel left June… Read More
          U.S. Department of State Implements Visa Waiver Program Entry Restrictions   
The government has now started implementing a rule disallowing "Visa Waiver" entries for nationals of Iran, Iraq, Syria or Sudan (whether or not they have ever visited those countries) and persons from any country who have visited those countries after March 1, 2011.
          Trump's Muslim Ban Comes Into Effect   
People from six mainly Muslim countries and all refugees now face tougher US entry due to President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban. It means people without close family or business relationships in the US could be denied visas and barred entry. Grandparents, aunts, uncles, nephews and nieces are not considered to be "bona fide" relations. The rules apply to people in Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen, as well as all refugees.
          TPS Designation for Syria    
Today the USCIS released details on Temporary Protective Status (TPS) application procedures for eligible Syrian nationals.  In addition to Syria, other designated countries include El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, Somalia, Sudan, and South Sudan. TPS designation can be made by the Secretary of Homeland Security when a foreign country has conditions that temporarily prevent the...
          Sudan'dan Abd'nin İnsan Ticareti Raporuna Tepki   
Sudan'dan Abd'nin İnsan Ticareti Raporuna TepkiSudan'dan Abd'nin İnsan Ticareti Raporuna Tepki
Sudan, ABD Dışişleri Bakanlığı tarafından "insan ticaretiyle mücadele etmeyen üçüncü grup" ülkeler arasında gösterilmesini kınadı

          ev yapımı tutkal tarifleri..bir sürü....   


Malzemeler

1 çay bardağı az yağlı inek sütü
1 çay kaşığı karbonat ya da yarım çay kaşığı kireç
1 tatlı kaşığı sirke
Kıvam alacak kadar su
Yapılışı

Sütü kaynamaya varmayacak seviyede ısıtın. Sıcak süte 1 tatlı kaşığı sirkeyi ekleyin ve karıştırın. Sirkenin etkisiyle süt birkaç dakika içinde kesilecek ve tortular kabın dibine çökecektir. Elde ettiğiniz bu karışımı tülbent ya da eski bir tül yardımıyla süzün ve sirke kalıntılarını gidermek için tülbentte kalan tortuları sudan geçirmeyi ihmal etmeyin. Elde ettiğiniz macun kıvamındaki tortuyu ayrı bir kaba alın ve tercihen karbonat ya da kireçi ekleyerek karıştırın. Son olarak ortaya çkan karışımı su yardımıyla seyrelterek tutkal kıvamına getirin.
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-
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Malzemeler:

1 ölçek un
1.5 ölçek su
1/3 ölçek şeker
1 tatlı kaşığı sirke
1 yumurtanın akı

Yapılışı:

Belirtilen ölçeklerdeki şeker, un ve yumurtayı bir kap içerisinde malzemeler listesinde belirtilen suyun yarısını kullanarak yavaş yavaş karıştırın. Önemli olan homojen pürüzsüz bir yapı elde etmek. Oluşan koyu kıvamlı karışımı seyrelterek tutkal kıvamını yakalamak için kalan suyu da ekleyin ve karıştırmaya devam edin. Tutkalın son bileşeni olan sirkeyi de ekleyin ve orta ateşte karışımı pişirmeye başlayın. Koyu bir kıvama gelmeye başladığında ocaktan indirip soğuttuğunuz karışım kullanıma hazırdır. güle güle kullanın.

bir cam kavanozda saklarsanız daha uzun süre kullanabilirsiniz

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bir başka tarif:
2 kasik Un 1 bardak su muhallebi gibi pisiryorsunuz,
blenderle cirpyorsunuz, sonra az bir sey beyaz tutkal atyorsunuz,
her yerde onu kullandim ( avize yapimi, gazete sepetler,her turlu kagit isleri ),

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yine bir tarif:


orta boyutlu bir kase içerisine yarım su bardağı un, ve bir su bardağının üçte biri kadar su koyun. Bu basit tutkal kısa süreli yapıştırmanız gereken kağıt vb. ürünlerde oldukça iyi sonuç verecektir. Bu tutkal kısa zamanda kuruduğu için genel olarak uzun vadeli projelerde kullanılmaz.

Tutkal hamurunuzu bir tencereye dökün ve köpürene kadar sürekli karıştırın. Köpürme başladığında , ocağı kapatın ve karışımı kullanmadan önce soğuyana kadar bir müddet bekleyin.

Bu tutkal zamanla küflenebilir. Küflenmeden korumak için, çalışmalarınızı bir ısıtıcı yardımı ile tamamen kurutmalısınız.
Kullanılmamış olan herhangi bir tutkalı sıkıca kapalı olan bir kaba koyup buzdolabına atın. Tutkal bir ya da iki hafta dayanacaktır.
Eğer tutkal kurursa, tekrar kullanmak için çok az ılık su ilave edin.
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Mısır Nişastası Tutkalı

3/4 su bardağı suyu, bir çay kaşığı sirke ve 2 yemek kaşığı mısır şurubu ile birlikte kaynatın. Küçük bir tencerede malzemelerinizi birlikte karıştırın. Ocağınızı orta sıcaklığa açın ve karışımı tamamen kaynamaya bırakın.

Mısır nişastası hamurunu karıştırın. Su ısındığı sırada, 1/4 su bardağı ile 3/4 su bardağı arasındaki miktarda suyu 2 yemek kaşığı mısır nişastası ile karıştırın. Ve düzgünce çırpın.

Mısır nişastası hamurunu kaynayan suya ekleyin. Su kaynadığı zaman, mısır nişastası hamurunu dikkatlice ekleyin ve kaynayana kadar sürekli olarak karıştırın.
Kaynadığında bir dakika kadar pişirin ve daha sonra ocağı kapatın. Karışımın çok uzun süre kaynamasına veya yanmasına izin vermeyin. Karışımı kaynadığı sırada bir kaşık yardımı ile sürekli olarak karıştırın.
Soğumasını bekleyin. Karışım soğuduktan sonra, kapaklı bir kaba dökün ve buzdolabında muhafaza edin. Bu tutkal buzdolabında 2 ila 4 hafta kadar kalabilir.
Tutkalı kullanmadan önce bir gece dinlendirirseniz daha iyi sonuç verir.

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Basit Pişmeyen Un Tutkalı Yapmak

Malzemelerinizi bir araya getirin. Bir su bardağı un, yarım su bardağı su ve bir çay kaşığının 8’de biri kadar tuzu bir araya getirin.
Malzemelerinizi küçük bir tencerede karıştırın. Yoğun bir tutkal yapmak için suyu , unun içerisine az az ekleyin. Bir tutam tuz atın ve iyice karıştırın. İşiniz tamamdır. Tutkalınızı çalışmalarınıza uygulamak için bir fırça kullanabilirsiniz.

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Yapıştırıcı:
Kullanılacak malzemeler: 40 gram toz şeker (yaklaşık bir kaşık), yarım bardak su, , 15 gram limon tuzu, ısıya dayanıklı kap, karıştırmak için kaşık, ısıtıcı.
Kabın içerisine koyarak suyu koyarak üzerine şekeri ilave ediniz. Isıtıcıda ısıtmaya başlayınız. Su ısındıktan sonra içerisine limontuzunu ekleyerek karıştırmaya devam ediniz. Karışım koyulaşana kadar karıştırarak ısıtmaya devam ediniz. Karışım sarı renk alıp yoğunlaştığında ısıtma karıştırma işlemini durdurunuz. Bir kaba koyarak soğutunuz. Yapıştırıcınız hazır demektir, istediğiniz yerde kullanabilirsiniz.
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1 adet yumurta akı 1 tatlı kaşıgı buglay nişastası 1- 2 damla limon suyu 1 çay kaşıgı şeker hepsini bir kabın içine koyun ve karıştırın daha sonra yapıştırıcınız hazır

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BENİM EN FAVORİ TARİFİMMMM:

1 kap pirinç
3-4 kap su

Kullandığınız kabın yaklaşık 2 katı kadar yapıştırıcı elde edeceksiniz. Bu yüzden ister çay bardağı ister su bardağı yada herhangi bir kabı ölçü olarak kullanabilirsiniz.

Pirinç ve suyu bir tencereye koyarak kısık ateşte 45 dakika kadar pişirin. Yulaf ezmesi kıvamına gelecek bu kıvamı yakalayana kadaar su ekleyebilir ve biraz daha pişirebilirsiniz.

Yulaf ezmesi yada lapa gibi bir kıvam alınca ateşten indirip soğumaya bırakın. Soğuduktan sonra genişce bir kapta blenderla pürüzsüz bir kıvam alana kadar çırpın. Belki çok az miktarda biraz daha su kullanabilirsiniz.

Yapıştırıcıyı artık kullanabilirsiniz. Kullanmadığınız zamanlarda ağzı kapalı şekilde budolabında muhafaza edin.


          Roxbury heist target handles cash for African immigrants   

The Roxbury money exchange business targeted in Tuesday’s gunpoint robbery of $420,000 in cash has outlets across the country and caters to African immigrants, according to its website and state records.

As the Herald reported yesterday, employees heading home from the Tremont Street branch of Dahabshil Inc. were held up on Cedar Street at 5:40 p.m. The stacks of bills they were carrying — stuffed into a silver suitcase — were stolen, police reported.

See the first story here...

Police reported they tracked down three suspects and recovered all the money less than five hours later.

A man answering the phone at Dahabshil Inc.’s headquarters in Dublin, Ohio, told the Herald last night it’s “not normal” for employees to drive around with that much money.

As for the heist, he added Boston police told him the case is “still under investigation.” The man, who declined to give his name, said the company has “taken the necessary steps” to alert employees to what happened.

“We’re like Western Union, we’re a money transmitter,” the man added. “We don’t have any more information about what happened.”

Dahabshil Inc. is listed as a foreign corporation that registered with the state in July 1998, according to the Secretary of State’s Office.

The company’s website says it “facilitates the transfer of money for immigrant communities and Non-Governmental Aid Agencies ... in alliance with Dahabshil PVT Somalia.”

The company offers services in cities in Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Djibouti, the website states.

The local office is located next to Roxbury Crossing. There was a sign on the door yesterday telling customers the business was closed because of technical issues. A man answering the phone number listed on the sign declined comment.

The three arrested in connection with Tuesday’s case are: Adnan Tahlil, 23, of Roxbury, charged with armed robbery, receiving stolen property, and drug possession. His bail was set at $75,000; Lee Harvey, 24, of Dorchester, charged with receiving stolen property and held on $50,000 bail; and Merih Tekleghiorghis, 25, of Brookline, charged with receiving stolen property. His bail was set at $5,000.

Joe Dwinell contributed to this report.

Author(s): 

Antonio Planas

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          Bursa'da alkollü kafadarlar ortalığı bir birine kattı   
Bursa’nın İznik ilçesinde, sahilde alkol alan iki kafadar, daha sonra serinlemek için göle girdi. Gençlerin ikisi de aynı anda sudan çıktı. Fakat alkolün etkisiyle bir birlerini fark etmeyen gençler polisi ve jandarmayı ayağa kaldırdı.Akşam...
          'A country suffering a nervous breakdown': openDemocracy readers respond to Brexit vote   

Shock. Rage. Analytic calm. A sense of loss. In the aftermath of the historic British vote to leave the EU, openDemocracy is asking for our readers' thoughts on Brexit and what needs to happen next. Here are some of your responses.

Anti-Brexit protesters demonstrate at the gates of Downing Street in central London after the UK voted to leave the European Uni Anti-Brexit protesters demonstrate at the gates of Downing Street in central London after the UK voted to leave the European Union. Credit: sabel Infantes/PA Wire/Press Association Images. All rights reserved.However you voted, the results of the referendum took many of us by surprise. The implications of the historic vote to leave the EU are only starting to emerge: the country's two main political parties in disarray, the possible breakup of the United Kingdom as Scotland and Northern Ireland weigh their options, racist attacks on the rise and huge divisions riven between remain and leave voters, young and old, immigrants and those who think they should leave.  

As a nation we are trying to digest what this vote means. We have more questions than answers about a future that is by no means clear and as we reflect on the possible futures the UK's historic vote has thrown open, openDemocracy is asking for your thoughts in 350 words. Below are four responses:
 

'I feel like I am living in a country that is suffering a nervous breakdown'

Never can I remember feeling the political situation in my country is so bleak. I am English, and I voted to Remain. I vote Remain not because I am a huge fan of the EU, but because I felt it was the lesser of two evils.

The Tory right and the media barons now hold more power than ever, and are in the ascendency marching forward with renewed confidence and a sense of empowerment. It is simply a case of bayoneting the wounded on the political battlefield from their point of view. The NHS, the BBC, workers' rights, consumer rights and environmental protection – it is all up for grabs now the EU is out of the way.  Not all of these things were connected to the referendum, however, my point is that those that seek to control us via an unleashing of market forces, now have the momentum and confidence to do so. The picture is indeed bleak.

Additionally, we have a far right, that is now also on the march. Social media is full of stories of ‘keyboard warriors’ turned rabble rousers turning their attention to hassling people in the street now they ‘have their country back’. I fear the murder of lawmaker Jo Cox – whilst extreme – is a sign of things to come, with the advent of a less tolerant society and a far right emboldened by their referendum victory.

England needs to get its act together. We will soon be out of a second union – the one with Scotland. At the moment, I feel like I am living in a country that is suffering a nervous breakdown. It will come out of the other end eventually, but as a very different country to the one we all grew up in.

From regular openDemocracy commenter Holmeboy, an educational salesman with an interest in current affairs from the north of England.
 

After Brexit, countries will have more power to resist neo-liberal financial measures

Although I realize that Brexit has many far-reaching consequences – and the xenophobia and racism involved makes me want to throw up – I tend to agree that this development provides freedom to other countries, who are in much need of this freedom. Allow me to make this point with willful exclusion of other important considerations.

Over the last few years we have seen some serious crises in the EU. Spain, Portugal and Greece were all understood to threaten the financial wellbeing of the entire Eurozone. Greece came closest to exiting the EU. The reason Greece wanted to exit, was not because exiting was a goal in itself, as is the case with the United Kingdom. 

Greece wanted no more of the neo-liberal financial measures – the cost-cutting needed to get its national budget up to EU standards was considered too damaging by the new Socialist government a year ago. Indeed, the effect of all the cost-cutting was dramatic. As a cynical side note: even the IMF has now released a report indicating that neo-liberal financial measures damage countries, rather than helping them. But for Greece, a Greek exit (Grexit) was a whip, a disciplinary measure, with which the Greeks were threatened if they failed to implement the required financial measures. This threat proved effective, and following crisis after crisis, Greece gave in and followed the neo-liberal financial agenda.

Imagine if Greece hadn't given in and chose to leave the EU. Almost certainly the EU would have tried to make this as difficult as possible. If the disciplinary measures proved insignificant, other countries would notice. That's why I believe the consequences for Greece would have been made as extreme as possible, to deter other countries (Spain, Portugal) from following suit.

Britain is important to the EU, so relations must remain strong and friendly – even after Brexit. Brexit negotiations will therefore be fair (at least in comparison to a Grexit). This will create a precedent on how to exit the EU. In international relations and international law, precedents are very important. The results of the negotiations between the UK and the EU will inform future expectations and negotiations, empowering those who want to exit but are not as important as the UK. But even more important, the exit as a disciplinary measure will be less threatening. Countries will have more power to resist neo-liberal financial measures, and thereby gain power during negotiations, even when they want to stay in the EU.

Jan van Heuzen holds a masters in philosophy of social sciences and in sociology of migration, and researches human trafficking and prostitution policies in the Netherlands and Canada.
 

This spells the end of Britishness

The rise and fall of Britishness shows that apparently ancient and stable European identities can be as recent, contingent, fragile and transient as any in the formerly colonised world. It is something which the Brexit vote has thrown into sharp relief, because it will probably lead to the end of the United Kingdom.

It was the existence of the British Empire, and the benefits they gained from it that made Scots, Welsh and Irish want to be British in the first place. It was service in and migration to and from that empire which formed Britishness as an identity. I think of myself as British – not English – even though the latter is what most of those I have met outside the British Isles consider me.

My surname is Scottish – that grandfather was born in Greenock, near Glasgow, though our Morrisons were originally from the Isle of Lewis. My grandfather spent 25 years working as an engineer for Sudan Railways on their Nile steamer services. When he returned to Britain in 1954 he settled in Fareham, near Portsmouth. His wife, my grandmother, was half English, half Austro-Hungarian Jewish. My other grandfather's family were all English, from Kent and Sussex, but my grandmother's family were part Irish,
part Anglo-Indian, and we had relatives living in southern India until the 1970s. 
With its mixture of backgrounds from different parts of the British Isles, and the strong connection with empire, this is a quintessentially British origin – and not, I think, an unusual one.

Britishness is a civic, not an ethnic identity. As such I think it has been easier for more recent migrants to the British Isles to identify with it than with Englishness. For me it is a much more personal question – although it was clear there was a decline in the number of those explicitly identifying as British, the United Kingdom was still there, and I didn't have to choose between being English, or Scottish – I could be British and leave it at that.

When Scotland leaves the UK, as following Brexit I believe it surely will, and if Northern Ireland follows, I think it will spell the end for Britishness, as a culture, a nationality, an identity – we will be able to chart its rise and fall in full, from the Union of Crowns in 1603 to dissolution of the United Kingdom in the early twentieth century. A lot of people will not be sorry to see it go – in many cases with good reason, given how many crimes have been committed in its name – but personally I will regret it – and I don't think its replacement with the type of 'Englishness' that brought us the Brexit vote will be an improvement.

Alexander Morrison is Professor of History at Nazarbayev University in Kazahkstan
 

Leave politicians have nothing to offer communities who voted out of Europe

Brexit is a symptom of deeper causes. In addition to directly causing an outbreak of open racism, plus enormous fear and uncertainty, the Leave vote has laid bare existing rifts and sicknesses in British society. We urgently need a political plan that confronts these underlying problems – racism, neoliberal austerity, the democratic deficit – as well as the place of Britain, or more likely England and Wales, within Europe.

The Leave politicians have not only called forth a storm of racism and xenophobia. They also have nothing, beyond the temporary warm feeling of having ‘taken control’, to offer those communities that voted overwhelmingly to leave. They have no plan to restore the institutions of the welfare state – themselves dependent on migrant workers – or to invest in failing industrial or post-industrial areas. They are in fact among the keenest to destroy these institutions and make Britain ever more subservient to the City of London. They have no plan for actually giving people ‘control’ over their lives, for addressing their powerlessness and disenfranchisement. All they can do is to exploit these facts, diverting people’s anger away from the real causes of their distress, towards migrants and minorities.

Most of the Remain camp have little to offer either. The Labour right, Tim Farron and much of the liberal commentariat seem to think the answer is to restore the political centrism of the Blair era, and to attempt to reverse the Brexit decision. But a Project Fear redux based purely on opposing the Brexit vote will, again, do nothing about the underlying issues. Instead, it will likely make concessions to the xenophobia of UKIP and the Leave campaign, pursuing a settlement with the EU that preserves the interests of finance capital but sacrifices the rights of people to move and work freely. It may well embolden the far-right or provoke a still bigger backlash against migrants and minorities.

Meanwhile, the one major political player which has offered to address the causes behind Brexit – austerity, neoliberalism, and, less strongly, the democratic deficit – is the Corbyn-led Labour Party. Corbyn’s leadership, after being constantly undermined by the media, is now facing an attack by an embittered Labour right. If Labour members can successfully defend it, their party has a chance of becoming a centre around which a new and creative political plan can form, capable of addressing the real issues behind the anger of Leave voters, of making a firm case for England and Wales as European countries, while resisting the anti-immigration rhetoric. If Corbyn goes under, we will still need to build that plan, with whatever political materials are left.

Peter Hill is a D. Phil. student at Oxford University working on Arabic literature. He is an editor of and regular contributor to the Oxford Left Review.

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          Trump Mulai Berlakukan Larangan Perjalanan Bagi 6 Negeri Muslim   

Headlineislam.com - Larangan sementara untuk memasuki Amerika Serikat (AS), yang digariskan Presiden Donald Trump terhadap warga enam negara berpenduduk mayoritas Muslim dan seluruh pengungsi, akhirnya akan diterapkan. Larangan perjalanan bagi pihak-pihak tersebut mulai diberlakukan pada Kamis (29/6) pukul 20.00 waktu setempat atau Jumat (30/6) pukul 07.00 WIB.

Kendati demikian, bentuk larangan itu berkurang. Yaitu masih memungkinkan warga tertentu dari negara-negara tersebut melakukan perjalanan ke AS.

Peluncuran langkah kontroversial itu dilakukan setelah Mahkamah Agung AS pada pekan ini memutuskan untuk mengizinkan perintah eksekutif Trump diterapkan. Namun, MA banyak mengurangi cakupan larangan. Yaitu dengan mengecualikan warga dan pengungsi yang memiliki hubungan ‘yang dapat dipercaya’ dengan seseorang atau kesatuan di Amerika Serikat.

Pada Rabu (28/6) malam, Departemen Luar Negeri mengatakan, bahwa berdasarkan putusan Mahkamah Agung, para pemohon visa dari Iran, Libya, Suriah, Somalia, Sudan dan Yaman harus memiliki hubungan dekat dengan keluarga atau hubungan resmi dengan suatu kesatuan di AS untuk diperbolehkan masuk ke Amerika Serikat. Trump pertama kali mengumumkan larangan perjalanan sementara itu pada Januari. Ia menyebut larangan sebagai langkah memerangi terorisme, guna memberi waktu untuk melakukan pemeriksaan keamanan lebih baik.

Perintah Trump itu menimbulkan kekacauan di bandar-bandar udara karena para petugas bergelut untuk melaksanakannya. Keputusan Presiden AS tersebut kemudian diblokir oleh pengadilan-pengadilan federal di tengah penentangan berbagai pihak, yang menganggap perintah Trump itu merupakan tindakan diskriminasi terhadap kalangan Muslim serta tidak ada pembenaran alasan soal aspek keamanan.

Larangan dalam versi yang sudah diperbaiki dimunculkan pada Maret tapi kemudian juga dibekukan oleh pengadilan. Pada Senin, Mahkamah Agung memutuskan untuk mengeluarkan izin penerapan larangan.

Bersarkan keputusan MA, warga dari keenam negara itu dan seluruh pengungsi dilarang memasuki AS, masing-masing untuk 90 hari dan 120 hari. Larangan hanya akan berlaku sebagian hingga MA menyidangkan kasus itu pada periode berikutnya, mulai Oktober. (em/headlineislam.com)
          American Muslims decry Trump travel ban   
CHICAGO---American Muslim leaders Friday decried Donald Trump's rhetoric towards their community and predicted the president's travel ban would eventually be proven unlawful, a day after a weakened version of the measure came into force.   A limited version of Trump's travel ban -- temporarily barring refugees and visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen -- took effect on Thursday, after the US Supreme Court allowed it to be enforced pending a full hearing in October.   READ: US travel ban on 6 mainly Muslim countries takes effect   The Trump administration says the ban is necessary to keep terrorists out of the country, but immigran...

Keep on reading: American Muslims decry Trump travel ban
          Director of Trade and Logistics Center - Global cst - Johannesburg, Gauteng   
Advantage of experience in agricultural products and consumer goods. For trade center in South Sudan.... R25 000 a month
From Indeed - Wed, 28 Jun 2017 08:43:42 GMT - View all Johannesburg, Gauteng jobs
          Maintenance Manager - Global cst - Johannesburg, Gauteng   
Experience in agricultural farm·. Knowledge of agricultural tools· Willingness to stay abroad for long periods·. For agriculture project in South Sudan.... R30 000 a month
From Indeed - Tue, 27 Jun 2017 13:13:54 GMT - View all Johannesburg, Gauteng jobs
          10 faktaa islaminuskosta   

Asioita joita et välttämättä ole tiennyt islaminuskosta Islam on maailman toiseksi suurin ja tällä hetkellä maailman nopeiten kasvava uskonto. Koraani on islamin pyhin kirja. Sana ’Koraani’ tarkoittaa resitaatiota arabian kielessä. Jos islamin usko jatkaa kasvuaan nykyistä tahtia, on se vuonna 2050 kristinuskon kanssa yhtä suuri. Saudi-Arabiassa, Sudanissa, Bruneissa, Qatarissa ja monissa muissa islamilaisissa valtioissa on […]

Artikkeli 10 faktaa islaminuskosta julkaistiin ensimmäisen kerran Faktat.fi.


          Nadide Sultan - Uçmalıyım   
Nadide Sultan’ın, Avrupa Müzik etiketiyle yayımlanan ”Uçmalıyım” isimli şarkısının video klibini izleme sayfasındasınız. Nadide Sultan – Uçmalıyım Şarkı Sözleri;   Sudan sebeplerle kaçıp kaçıp sonra dükkana döndün Affedilmeyi bekledin olmadı iğne ipliğe döndün Ellerin iyisi evlerin delisisin Seni annen sevsin Beni bulursan selam söyleyiver Ne yaptıysan gördüm Farketmedin üstünü çizdiğimi Eski defteri gömdüm Olmasaydın keşke […]
          Denizalası(Salmo trutta labrax)   

                                                                                     
                   
Familyası Latincesi İngilizcesi Mahalli Adı
Salmonidae Salmo trutta labrax Black sea trout Deniz alası, alabalık
Morfolojik Özellikleri: 

 Vücut füze şeklinde olup, kırmızı lekeler vücudun her tarafına dağılmış, bariz siyah beneklerde mevcuttur. Omur sayısı 55-60 adettir. Denizlerle tatlı sular arasında yumurtlama göçü yaparlar.

 (Salmo trutta)birçok dillerde «Karadeniz alabalığı» diye tanınır. Bu balık som balığı'na benzer, yalnız daha toplu yapılıdır, burnu da daha kısadır. Kuyruk yüzgeci de som balığı'nınkinden daha sığ çatallıdır. Sırtının rengi mavimsi-gridir, yanları ile karnı gümüş parıltılı beyaz ya da sarımsıdır. Bazısında geniş ve düzensiz siyah lekeler vardır.Bazısında ise yoktur. Uzunluğu ortalama 50-70 santim, ağırlığı 1-4 kilodur. Bununla beraber 15 kilo ağırlığında olanlarının tutulduğu olmuştur.

Deniz alası, öbür alabalıklardan daha sıcak sularda yasayabilir. Bu yüzden dünya yüzünde çok yaygındır. Avrupa'da İzlanda ve Norveç'le Akdeniz arasındaki sularda, ayrıca Korsika'da, Sardunya'da, hatta doğuda Himalayalardan inen sularda görülür. Birleşik Amerika'nın kuzeyinde, Kanada'da, Arjantin'de, Güney Afrika'da, Seylân'da, Avustralya'da, Tasmanya'da ve Yeni Zelanda'da da tutunmuştur. Eti öbür alabalıklarınki kadar lezzetli değilse de başka türlere elverişli olmayan şartlar altında gelişebilmesi sebebiyle değerli bir balık sayılır. Deniz alaları da, başka alabalıklar ve som balıkları gibi, yumurtlamak için nehirlere girerler. Bir de bütün hayatlarını tatlı suda geçirenleri vardır. Renkleri biraz farklı olduğu için, bunlar yakın zamana kadar ayrı bir tür sanılıyordu.

Deniz alası'nın yumurtaları küre biçiminde ve yaklaşık olarak 5 milimetre çapındadır. Öbür alabalıkgillerin yumurtaları gibi sudan biraz ağır ve ilk yuımırtlandıklan zaman az' çok yapışkandırlar. Dişi, yumurtalarının akıntıyla sürüklenmemesi için, akarsunun çakıllı dibinde 15-20 santim derinliğinde bir çukur kazar ve yumurtalarını bunun içine döker. Yumurtaların dibe yapışmaları da sürüklenmemelerinin sebeplerinden biridir. Dişi bir parti yumurta yumurtladıktan sonra eskisinden biraz yukarıda yeni bir çukur kazmaya girişir, bu arada yerinden oynattığı taşlar ve çakıllar eski çukurun içine yuvarlanarak yumurtaları örter. Yumurtalar böylece 15-20 santimlik bir çakıl örtüsünün altında, yumurta yiyen balıklardan ve başka hayvanlardan korunmuş olurlar. Yavrular çıkana kadar aradan 40-70 gün geçer. Deniz alaları sonbahar sonlarında yumurta dökerler. Bir deniz alası hayatında yedi kere yumurtlayabilir.
Maksimum uzunluğu 100 cm.
Ortalama uzunluğu 50-70 cm.
Maksimum ağırlığı 26 kg
Ortalama ağırlığı 5-7 kg
Üreme zamanları
Ocak Şubat Mart Nisan Mayıs Haziran Temmuz Ağustos Eylül Ekim Kasım Aralık
x  x  x  x
Avlanma Yöntemleri: Koruma altında olup, avcılığı tamamen yasaktır. 
          Civil rights groups slam US President Donald Trump's new travelling restrictions   
Volunteer lawyers set up a table to help arriving passengers with the reinstatement by the US Supreme Court of portions of President Donald Trump's executive order targeting travelers from six predominantly Muslim countries, at Los Angeles International Airport, California, US, June 29, 2017. (Photo by Reuters)
Civil rights groups in the United States have slammed the US travel ban on six predominantly Muslim countries that took effect on Thursday.
The American Civil Liberties Union described the measure as extremely restrictive and arbitrary. The group said the ban has been designed “disparage and condemn Muslims.”
It is expected that rights groups will also mount legal challenges to the US travel ban.
A scaled-back version of US President Donald Trump’s controversial travel ban has gone into effect after months of legal wrangling.
The 90-day ban targets citizens from six predominantly Muslim countries, namely Iran, Syria, Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Sudan.
The state of Hawaii has already challenged it, saying the rules do not specify exactly who could be allowed into the US.
Shortly after the measure went into force, protesters gathered in New York City and Los Angeles to condemn it.
People protest the restrictive guidelines issued by the US on who qualifies as a close familial relationship under the Supreme Court order on the Muslim and refugee ban at Union Square in New York, June 29, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
Meanwhile, the Iranian foreign minister has denounced the ban in a tweet, calling it a shameful exhibition of blind hostility to all Iranians.
The Supreme Court partially restored a portion of Trump’s executive order on Monday, saying lower courts that had totally blocked the policy went too far in limiting the president’s authority.
The Supreme Court's decision stipulated that citizens of the affected countries with a close relative in the US will potentially be allowed in.
Trump’s initial ban and his second version, blocked by lower courts, also provoked huge protests and created chaos at international airports.
The US president insists his ban is necessary for national security and points to terrorist attacks in Paris, London, Brussels and Berlin as evidence.
However, critics have called Trump's ban discriminatory against Muslims. They say, the White House’s unwavering support for countries such as Saudi Arabia which promotes the ideology of terror groups such as Daesh is indicative of its double standards toward security issues and terrorism.

          Hundreds of people in Union Square in New York City hold rally after US President Donald Trump’s Muslim ban takes effect   
People take part in a rally to protest restrictive guidelines issued by the US on who qualifies as close family under the Supreme Court order on the Muslim, Union Square, New York, June 29, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
Hundreds of people have descended upon Union Square in New York City to protest against President Donald Trump's travel ban that came into effect Thursday.
Protesters were gathering in Union Square Park at 5:30 pm to protest what they call "Trump's Muslim Ban 3.0."
Organizers also attended a town hall meeting on Muslims Thursday night.
"I believe that America is a country of liberty and of freedom, and that we should be accepting of all people," a female protester told local media.
After five months of bitter legal squabbling, President Trump’s revised travel ban took effect Thursday after the Supreme Court allowed the administration to go forward with the implementation.
"The use of national security as the rationale for implementing the Muslim ban is quite comical, to say the least," said Murad Awadeh of New York Immigration Coalition.
The US State Department has announced new criteria for visa applicants from six Muslim-majority countries.
Under the new rules, citizens of Iran, Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya and Yemen would be given a US visa only if they have a “close” family or business tie there.
People march at Union Square against President Trump's travel ban, June 29, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
"Donald Trump does not get to decide who is family or what is love," New York City protest organizers said in a statement on Facebook.
"It's up to us now to fight back against this latest attack and stand up for the values that truly make America great: opportunity and justice for all," they added.
The new guidelines do not allow grandparents, grandchildren, uncles, aunts, cousins and fiancés to travel to the US.
“The president is supposed to protect American families, not rip them apart,” said Shayan Modarres, a lawyer with the National Iranian American Council.
The state of Hawaii has asked a federal judge for clarification regarding the Supreme Court ruling, arguing that the administration has interpreted the court's decision too narrowly.
Trump’s first travel ban caused much confusion in January with visa holders being kept off flights or barred entry on arrival in the US.
Lower courts blocked that initial directive and, in March, the president issued a revised order intended to overcome legal hurdles.
However, the revised order was also blocked by federal judges in the states of Hawaii and Maryland and upheld by the 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.
The Supreme Court on Monday narrowed the scope of lower court rulings and agreed to hear the administration’s appeal in these cases. 

          UN Security Council agrees to reduce peacekeeping force in Darfur   
Peacekeeper troops from Ethiopia and deployed in the UN Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA) patrol outside Abyei town, in Abyei state, on December 14, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
The UN Security Council on Thursday agreed to a major drawdown of peacekeepers in Sudan’s troubled region of Darfur after US pressure led to a $600-million cut in the UN budget for peace operations.
The council unanimously adopted a British-drafted resolution that will reduce the number of troops and police serving in the joint African Union-UN mission known as UNAMID by at least 30 percent.
Deployed in 2007, UNAMID has about 16,000 blue helmets on the ground who are tasked with protecting civilians in the war that Sudan’s government forces and pro-Khartoum militias are waging against rebel groups.
The United Nations and African Union maintain that the Darfur conflict is winding down and that the mission -- among the costliest with a budget of over $1 billion -- should be trimmed.
Human rights groups warn that the conflict is far from over and that the withdrawal of UN peacekeepers will leave many areas of the vast Darfur region without international protection.
“We recognize that the situation in Darfur remains fragile,” said British Deputy Ambassador Peter Wilson, but he added that the situation had "evolved" and that the changes reflected “the current reality.”
The council agreed to a gradual reduction of UNAMID peacekeepers to be carried out in two phases of six months.
United Nation peacekeepers rest next to an armored personnel carrier about 60 kilometers north of El-Fasher, the capital of the North Darfur state, on February 9, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
A first drawdown will reduce the number of UNAMID troops from 13,000 to about 11,400 in six months before dropping to 8,735 by the end of June 2018.
The number of police will drop from 3,150 to 2,888 by January and 2,500 by June.
The smaller UNAMID will be redeployed to the region of Jebel Marra, where most of the recent violence has been reported.
The drawdown however could be reviewed if the Sudanese government fails to ensure protection in those areas from where the peacekeepers will withdraw.
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres will report to the council after six months on whether “conditions on the ground remain conducive to further reductions."
More than 2.5 million people have been displaced and 300,000 killed in the conflict that erupted in 2003 when ethnic minority rebels took up arms against President Omar al-Bashir’s Arab-dominated government, accusing it of marginalizing the region.
The General Assembly is scheduled to vote on Friday on the new peacekeeping budget of $7.3 billion, down from the current $7.87 billion.

          Vacaciones, wifi y sol en París   
Vacaciones, wifi y sol en ParísAtrás quedaron los tiempos en que las vacaciones eran una institución. Agosto paralizaba el país y nos sumía en una especie de letargo estacional, sin mermar ni un ápice nuestros planes de evasión. Ahora los que quedan encadenados a su lugar de trabajo sudan más que bajo el tórrido sol del mediodía. Otros, a su laptop o dispositivos móviles sin ...  Leer artículo completo
          Khartoum 1966 LE 1080p BluRay x264 DTS-HD 2.0-Grym   
Khartoum.1966.LE.Bluray.1080p.DTS-HD-2.0.x264-Grym Summary: After an Egyptian army, commanded by British officers, is destroyed in a battle in the Sudan in the 1880’s, the British government is in a quandary. It does not want to commit...
          Larangan Kontroversial Trump untuk 6 Negara Muslim Mulai Diberlakukan   
BINTANGNEWS.com –  Media PressTV berbahasa Inggris melaporkan,” Amerika Serikat (AS) mulai memberlakukan larangan perjalanan kontroversial Presiden Donald Trump terhadap warga negara
dari enam negara mayoritas Muslim, meskipun banyak menentang rencana tersebut.

Larangan tersebut diberlakukan pada mulai Kamis malam, setelah Mahkamah Agung mengizinkan pemerintah Trump untuk memberlakukan larangan tersebut, ini merupakan kemenangan yang mengejutkan kepada presiden Republik yang maverick tersebut.

Mahkamah Agung pada hari Senin mempersempit lingkup putusan pengadilan yang lebih rendah yang menghalangi larangan Trump atas warga Muslim untuk diberlakukan secara nasional, dan juga setuju untuk mendengarkan seruan pemerintah dalam kasus-kasus ini. Larangan tersebut terutama bagi orang-orang diantaranya Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Suriah dan Yaman.

Namun, pengadilan mengabulkan permintaan darurat pemerintah untuk segera mengumumkan keputusan presiden, sementara tarik ulur hukum masih berlanjut.

Menurut keputusan tersebut, warga dari enam negara yang tidak memiliki hubungan "bonafide" dengan seseorang atau entitas di Amerika akan ditolak masuk, akan tetapi bagi orang yang bisa membuktikan bahwa mereka memiliki hubungan dengan seseorang atau entitas di AS, maka akan Diizinkan untuk bepergian ke negara ini.

Hakim mengatakan bahwa larangan bepergian berlaku "sehubungan dengan warga negara asing yang tidak memiliki hubungan baik dengan seseorang atau entitas di Amerika Serikat."

Trump's controversial travel ban comes into effectThis means people who do not have close family or business relationships in America could be denied visas and barred entry.

"We expect business as usual at the ports of entry starting at 8 pm tonight," a Department of Homeland Security official said on Thursday. "Our people are well prepared for this."
Hawaii asks court to clarify travel ban ruling

Moments before the ban began at 20:00 Washington time, the state of Hawaii had asked a federal judge for clarification regarding the Supreme Court ruling, arguing that the Trump administration had interpreted the court's decision too narrowly.

Hawaii accused the federal government of attempting to violate the Supreme Court's instructions by improperly excluding people who actually have a close family relationship in the US.

Menurut pemerintah AS, kakek-nenek, bibi, paman, keponakan dan keponakan tidak dianggap sebagai "bonafide" hubungan.

Trump mengeluarkan larangan perjalanan yang direvisi pada tanggal 6 Maret setelah perintah awalnya ditandatangani pada bulan Januari diblokir oleh seorang hakim federal di negara bagian Washington dan dituntut oleh Pengadilan Tinggi AS untuk Sirkuit ke-9 di San Francisco, California.

However, the revised order was also blocked by federal judges in the states of Hawaii and Maryland and upheld by the 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.***

Continue to follow the World Resources on twitter @ bintangnews.com


Editing: T.Bintang                                                      
Source: PressTV.com


          Come tenere al fresco i bimbi in auto   

mantenere al fresco i bimbi in autoEcco qui di seguito alcuni piccoli accorgimenti per tenere al fresco i bimbi in auto Bambini e caldo, quali sono le precauzioni da adottare? Più sono piccoli e più hanno bisogno di idratazione. Questo perchè sudano di più e non riescono a disperdere in maniera molto facile il calore, e come se non bastasse non […]

Come tenere al fresco i bimbi in auto - News Mondo


          UN approves drawdown of peacekeepers in Sudan's Darfur region   
UNITED NATIONS: The United Nations Security Council on Thursday approved a phased drawdown of peacekeepers in Sudan's Darfur region that could almost halve the number of troops over the next year if conditions are conducive and the government is cooperative. U.N. chief Antonio Guterres and the ...
          South Sudan says aid workers can not go to 'insecure' rebel-held areas   
NAIROBI: South Sudan's government says it may withhold permission for aid workers to go to some rebel-held areas on security grounds, the president's spokesman said on Thursday, after the U.N. complained aid convoys were being blocked. "We cannot allow them (aid workers) to go and then be hit by ...
          100 Days of the Resistance: One Action for Every Day of Trump's Presidency   
From the Women's March to rogue Twitter accounts, US citizens are fighting back one day at a time. by Stranger Staff

Day 1: More people seem to protest than attend Donald Trump's inauguration. The stands in DC, normally filled with fans, are eerily empty. A limo is set on fire. Also: White nationalist Richard Spencer is punched during an interview near the inauguration.

Day 2: More than three million people wear pussy hats and attend the Women's Marches around the world. In Seattle, 175,000 people march, the biggest protest in the history of the city.

Day 3: The euphoria of the previous day has dwindled. People realize that Trump is actually fucking president. They start drinking all the beer in the house until they've finished that and then move on to the whiskey.

Day 4: White House staffers begin leaking to the press.

Day 5: For the past few days, a mysterious pirate-radio broadcast has been interrupting radio signals across the country—an oldies station in Texas, a community radio station in Kentucky, and others in Indiana and South Carolina, including local Voice of Vashon's 101.9 FM—airing (the uncensored version of) YG and Nipsey Hussle's "Fuck Donald Trump" continuously on repeat.

Day 6: Six days in. Drinking all the vodka in the universe.

Day 7: @RoguePOTUSStaff, an anonymous Twitter account claiming to be "the unofficial resistance team inside the White House" sends its first tweet: "Pres. Trump is already making waves at the office. Wants to be 'the President who will be remembered as a King.' His words, not ours."

Day 8: Dozens more "rogue" accounts show up on Twitter, people somehow believe they are all real, Twitter becomes an even more insufferable website than it already was.

Day 9: Fueled by rage (and possibly by post-inauguration binge drinking), more than 3,000 protesters demonstrate at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport after six people were detained in response to Trump's first executive order, which sought to ban refugees and immigrants from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen—all Muslim-majority countries—from coming into the United States.

Day 10: Amid protests over Trump's travel ban, the American Civil Liberties Union announces that it received a record $24 million in donations over a single weekend. In just January alone, the organization saw a 1,900 percent increase in donations from the same month in 2016.

Day 11: Washington becomes the first state to sue Trump over the Muslim-majority country travel ban, arguing it's unconstitutional. In doing this, Washington State attorney general Bob Ferguson becomes a national heartthrob.

Day 12: It has been only 12 days of the Trump presidency, and everyone we know has aged 1,000 years.

Day 13: Everyone is talking about the Budweiser pro-immigration ad. Set in the 19th century, it has a young German man arriving in the US. He gets yelled at by drunk Americans, who want him to go back to his country. He doesn't listen to them and instead settles in the heartland and starts a brewery that will grow into a massive corporation that creates lots of American jobs. The commercial made it clear that corporate America does not like the Muslim ban.

Day 14: Utah congressman Jason Chaffetz's proposed bill HR 621—which aimed to sell off 3.3 million acres of federally-owned land—is withdrawn due to public outcry and backlash from hunters, sportsmen, and conservationists on both the left and the right. Turns out, people don't like the idea of privatizing public land.

Day 15: Washington proves that we aren't going to take any unconstitutional bullshit when Seattle-based US District judge James Robart grants Washington attorney general Bob Ferguson's request for a temporary restraining order against Trump's (first) Muslim-nation travel ban, prohibiting federal employees from enforcing it and spurring collective 'Fuck yeahs!' and high-fives around the nation.

Day 16: Former Chumbawamba member Danbert Nobacon—now living in Twisp, Washington—pens an anti-Trump song titled "Revolution 9.01" that champions science and disdains the incoming ignoramus-in-chief. It's off his Stardust to Darwinstuffalbum, which you can buy now.

Day 17: The New England Patriots win a big sports game, which, because of tradition, grants them access to the White House. But shortly after their victory, six Patriots players announce they won't be attending the visit for political reasons. When the visit happens in April, more than two dozen players skip.

Also: Melissa McCarthy plays Sean Spicer and it enrages Trump, who more than anything hates that a woman has portrayed his moronic press secretary.

Day 18: Ninety-seven companies—including Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, and Twitter—file an amicus brief opposing Trump's travel ban.

Day 19: Two sterling indie-rock comps from the Northwest—Battle Hymns

out of Portland and SAD! A Barsuk Compilation for the ACLUout of Seattle—come out, earnestly striving to raise funds for organizations (Planned Parenthood and the ACLU) necessary in the fight to thwart Trumpism.

Day 20: Rosie O'Donnell impersonator Sean Spicer says that Nordstrom dropping Ivanka Trump's brand of shoes and handbags is an attack on the president, erasing whatever little respect anyone had left for him.

Day 21: The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals refuses to reinstate Trump's travel ban, writing a stinging rebuttal of the idea that the judiciary has no role in mitigating presidential power. Trump tweets: "SEE YOU IN COURT!" to the court.

Day 22: Protesters in DC block newly appointed secretary of education Betsy DeVos from entering a public school. "Shame, shame," they shout as DeVos drives away in a black SUV. No bears were sighted at the demonstration

Day 23: Protesters gather at Cal Anderson Park (and across the country) for an LGBTQ Solidarity Rally after word that an executive order is in the works aiming to allow organizations to use religious beliefs to deny services to gay and transgender people.

Day 24: Seattleites hold the Seattle-esty event ever by flocking to Optimism Brewing on Capitol Hill to send Valentine's Day–themed postcards expressing their values to their political representatives.

Day 25: Michael Flynn quits as the national security adviser just before midnight. He had admitted to misleading VP Mike Pence regarding contacts with a Russian envoy.

Day 26: Love is dead, but the Resistance isn't.

Day 27: Victory! A Trump cabinet member goes poof! Andrew Puzder withdraws as labor secretary nominee after Mitch McConnell says the Republicans will withhold support for the CEO of CKE Restaurants (which owns Hardee's and Carl's Jr. fast-food chains) after Puzder came under fire for allegedly hiring an undocumented immigrant.

Day 28: Across America and in Seattle, workers take the day off for A Day Without an Immigrant. Some restaurants close in solidarity.

Day 29: The White House sends out a very slanted e-mail questionnaire, "Mainstream Media Accountability," about "media bias." Non Trump supporters fill out the form and troll him.

Day 30: Don Lemon grows balls, stands up to Trump defender/commentator Paris Dennard, tells him to shut it on referring to reporting on Trump and Mar-a-Lago as "fake news."

Day 31: Nation realizes it's barely been a month since Trump was inaugurated. Doesn't get out of bed.

Day 32: Milo Yiannopoulos is booted from his keynote speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference. Old interviews on YouTube resurface of him talking about how he thinks sex between older men and younger boys is A-okay. Cue sudden conservative outrage.

Day 33: Stranger

staffers pick at the stale leftovers of Heidi Groover's birthday sheet cake, which had Alex Jones's (of Infowars) face printed on it. He was crying.

Also: Milo Yiannopoulos resigns as editor of Breitbart. Other conservatives, including Richard Spencer, have turned on him, deciding that racist and sexist remarks are fine, but man-boy love is a bridge too far. Milo goes into exile.

Day 34: The Washington Post has no chill and changes its motto to "Democracy Dies in Darkness."

Day 35: Trump gives his first address to Congress to some fanfare, but Lindsey Graham says Trump's draconian budget cuts will be DOA.

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Also: In response to Congressman Dave Reichert's (WA-8) failure to hold public meetings for his constituents, silver-haired boomers and youthful residents of the district hold the first of many protests outside Reichert's Issaquah office. A mandola player leads the crowd of 100 in song: "Hangin' around his office in town, / waitin' for my congressman. / Just wanted to tell him my concerns, / what I want from Washington. But I can tell you now, Dave's not here, / he sure don't want to listen to me."

Day 36: Leaked details of the Republicans' Obamacare replacement plan reveal that said plan would cover fewer people, despite Trump's promise that, somehow, everybody would have insurance. This foreshadows weeks of town-hall meetings with angry constituents who need Obamacare to, you know, live.

Day 37: Even Fox News anchor Shepard Smith belatedly realizes that the administration his network elected into office is dangerously incompetent, or incompetently dangerous. After White House press secretary Sean Spicer bars CNN, Buzzfeed, Politico, the Hill, the BBC, and the LA Times

from a White House press gaggle, Smith defends CNN on air.

Day 38: During the Oscars, the New York Times

runs an ad titled "The Truth Is Hard." Also, some celebs air their feelings about the ad's target audience, a man who almost certainly watches the ceremony from the comfort of his own bathrobe.

Day 39: Noble defender of civil liberties George W. Bush tells NBC's Matt Lauer that the media is "indispensable to democracy." This from the former president whose administration leaked bad intelligence to the New York Times' Judith Miller, who printed said intelligence, intelligence that would be used to justify the invasion of Iraq. Yanks!

Day 40: The sixth iteration of #ResistTrumpTuesday kicks off outside the Federal Building in downtown Seattle. For the first 100 days of Trump's reign, a group of resisters led by local Indivisible chapters hold mid-morning rallies before heading up to the offices of Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell. In groups of four or five, organizers then meet with congressional staff in order to praise the senators for correct action or encourage them to stand firm against Trump's agenda.

Day 41: Sixty-one police chiefs and sheriffs from all over the country—including deep red states Trump won—tell the administration in a letter that they refuse to turn their precincts into mini ICE enforcement agencies.

Day 42: Attorney General Jeff Sessions temporarily joins the Resistance by recusing himself from the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. This comes after the revelation that Sessions met with the Russian ambassador during the run-up to the election. Wow, Jeff! Stick it to the man!!!!

Day 43: Briefly considered calling Trump "45," but didn't want to sully the reputation of those little vinyl records that people care about for some reason.

Day 44: Double-checked the plaque at the base of the Statue of Liberty, mother of exiles, as Trump signs a new executive order banning immigration from six Muslim-majority countries.

Day 45: Responding to Trump's lie about President Obama putting "wiretaps" on his phone, former director of national intelligence James Clapper flatly denies any such monitoring.

Day 46: Nation takes day off work, goes to a spa. Decides they are worth it.

Day 47: Standing in the lobby of Trump Tower, Jeff Bergman reads from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail." The arts administrator and inadvertent activist began solitary read-ins at the tower during his lunch hour, and has now formed a group called Learn as Protest and a syllabus. On the list: Rebecca Solnit's Hope in the Dark, Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, and Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism, among others.

Day 48: Organizers with the Women's March dub this International Women's Day "A Day Without a Woman." Women are encouraged to eschew paid and unpaid work to show the might of the women's workforce. Those who can't afford to take the day off work are encouraged to wear red in solidarity and to support women- and minority-owned businesses. Scores of think pieces are written about the privilege of skipping a day of work.

Day 49: Trumpcare passes through the House Ways and Means Committee. The Resistance begins to seriously worry about its health.

Day 50: One month after Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell silenced Senator Elizabeth Warren's speech criticizing Attorney General Jeff Sessions, impassioned members of the Resistance are still getting "Nevertheless, she persisted" stick-n-poke tattoos.

Day 51: Today is Sydney Brownstone's birthday. She does not cry in public.

Day 52: After Trump moves to purge Obama-era US attorneys, New York's Preet Bharara refuses to submit his resignation. Shortly after, Bharara gets fired.

Day 53: The GOP's replacement for the Affordable Care Act gets eviscerated by the Congressional Budget Office. It finds that 24 million people would lose insurance under the GOP's plan.

Day 54: Rachel Maddow's scoop on Trump's tax returns is met with criticism. Maddow loves a long lead, and people unaccustomed to her show whined about the 25-minute wind-up to the less-than-blockbuster findings, which were from a 2005 return. While more complete than the previous leak from the 1990s, it still didn't reveal the full extent of Trump's possible financial and political entanglements.

Day 55: Trump survives his first Ides of March.

Day 56: A Hawaiian federal judge freezes Trump's travel ban. It is also shut down in Maryland.

Day 57: Northwest Film Forum and film distribution company Abramorama announce "The Seventh Art Stand," a film series featuring movies from countries affected by the travel ban, to screen in more than 30 venues across the country. Included is The Salesmanby Asghar Farhadi, an Iranian filmmaker who won an Oscar in February but did not attend, issuing a statement that said: "Dividing the world into the 'us' and 'our enemies' categories creates fears... Filmmakers can turn their cameras to capture shared human qualities and break stereotypes of various nationalities and religions. They create empathy between us and others. An empathy which we need today more than ever."

Day 58: Took ecstasy and went dancing at Re-bar.

Day 59: The deputy director of the NSA mocks Trump's claims that England had anything to do with "spying." Calls the assertion "just crazy."

Day 60: The left cheers when FBI director James Comey tells the House Intelligence Committee that the FBI has found no evidence of Obama wiretapping the Trump Towers but it is investigating connections between Trump and Russia.

Day 61: Liberals wake up in bed next to the House Freedom Caucus, who vow not to vote for Trumpcare/Ryancare unless more benefits are removed from the bill.

Day 62: Trump and Ryan slash more benefits from the AHCA in an attempt to appease the Freedom Caucus, but they remain unmoved. You cannot kick enough people off of health care to satisfy this recalcitrant bunch of Tea Partyers. Meanwhile, Democrats say the bill has no chance in the Senate. Many credit their new, steely spines to calls from constituents.

Day 63: As a cocktail of one part national resistance and two parts Republican Party infighting threatens to kill the GOP plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, Washington's own congressman Dave Reichert (R-Auburn) appears to get cold feet. Though Reichert is one of few Republicans who has already voted for the bill, his spokesperson tells the Seattle Timeshe's undecided the day before a final vote is expected.

Day 64: Trumpcare/Ryancare is dead. After it becomes clear the bill doesn't have the votes to pass, House leadership pulls it, delivering Trump an embarrassing defeat and saving insurance coverage for millions.

Day 65: An estimated 8,000 people in Moscow protest against corruption and Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin, the president of the Russian Federation. Some commentators even wonder if the man who runs the White House, Putin, is facing his Arab Spring or Green Revolution.

Day 66: In an attempt to shine a light on the shadowy figures visiting Trump at the White House and the "winter White House," Democrats introduce the adorably titled "Mar-a-Lago Act," an acronym for "Making Access Records Available to Lead American Government Openness Act."

Day 67: The Resistance's target shifts as Jared Kushner becomes president of the United States of America. As head of the "White House Office of American Innovation," Kushner is suddenly in charge of fixing America's opioid crisis, dealing with China on trade, brokering peace between Israel and Palestine, overseeing Trump's internal personnel, and criminal justice reform.

Day 68: Millions briefly consider giving up porn in response to the passage of a bill that allows internet providers to sell a client's browsing history to advertisers. Though the bill is complete bullshit, it would have been "nice" if lawmakers waited one more day to pass it. ;)

Day 69: Seattle sues Trump. After Attorney General Jeff Sessions blasts "sanctuary" cities and counties, and the Trump administration threatens to strip funding from those jurisdictions, Seattle mayor Ed Murray and the city attorney announce a lawsuit against the Feds. In making their announcement, city leaders focus on Sessions's claims that cities and counties that label themselves "sanctuaries" for undocumented immigrants make the country less safe. "We know, anecdotally, just from what people themselves have told us, that they don't want to come forward because they're afraid, and they know other people in the community who won't come forward and report crimes because of fear," Deputy Chief of Police Carmen Best told The Stranger. A decision has not yet been reached in the case.

Day 70: Former national security adviser Michael Flynn offers to testify in exchange for immunity. Some people think this is a huge deal.

Day 71: Michael Cox, a Bainbridge Island resident, resigns from the Environmental Protection Agency after serving as a climate-change adviser for the Pacific Northwest region for nearly 30 years. In a letter to Trump-appointed EPA head Scott Pruitt, Cox cited proposed budget cuts and climate-change denial within the department as his reasons for leaving.

Day 72: The NYT's Nicholas Kristof points out in his excellent post "In Trump Country, Shock at Trump Budget Cuts but Still Loyalty" that there is no real hope for Trump voters, many of whom live in rural areas. They still support him, still believe he is going to return greatness to them and their America, even as he is threatening to deprive these supporters of life-improving and even life-saving federal services. The Resistance needs to be sober to this fact and move on.

Day 73: A poster that says "!NO¡ ¡A EXPULSAR AL REGIMEN DE TRUMP Y PENCE!" is spotted on First Hill.

Day 74: Senate Democrats officially gather the 41 votes needed to filibuster the Supreme Court nomination of Neil Gorsuch, an extremely conservative jurist who consistently favors corporations over human beings in lawsuits.

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Day 75: Democratic Socialists of America reaches 20,000 members.

Day 76: Two things today: One, Stephen Bannon, the lord of darkness, gets booted out of the Principals Committee of the US National Security Council. Two, many on the left spend the day panning and blasting a Pepsi ad that shows Kendall Jenner joining a Black Lives Matter–type protest, and then leaving it to give a Pepsi to a cop who is preparing to crack some millennial skulls. The cop accepts the Pepsi, takes a sip, and everything is solved.

Day 77: It's the first day of class for students of the Resistance School, founded by a group of Harvard graduate students to teach the art of taking a stand against Trump. Classes include how to mobilize your community, communicating political advocacy, and how to sustain the Resistance in the long term. More than 200 students show up for the class on campus, while 15,000 people from 50 states and 20 countries tune in via the livestream.

Day 78: After months of complaints about bots and fake news, Facebook finally does something about it and posts "fake news tips" at the top of its users' feeds.

Day 79: The radical left and alt-right unite in their opposition to Trump's strikes on Syria. Well, at least until they meet in the same spot. In another test of our perception of reality, white nationalist Richard Spencer adds a Syrian flag to his Twitter bio and leads an anti-bombing protest in front of the White House. He's met by antifascists who throw glitter in his face and attempt to pull him out of a cab.

Day 80: Alec Baldwin's SNLskit of Trump meeting his supporters and shitting on them is circulated on social media.

Day 81: About 100 immigrant detainees at Tacoma Northwest Detention Center launch a hunger strike to protest conditions at the lockup, which has seen a surge in inmates since the Trump administration implemented a plan to ramp up deportations. That number would grow to 750 within three days, according to activists.

Day 82: A Kansas special election nearly flips for the Democrats. The close race had Republicans panicking, with Trump and Pence flying in to hold impromptu rallies.

Day 83: The first protest in space (as we know it) occurs when the Autonomous Space Agency Network (ASAN) tapes a printed tweet to a weather balloon. The tweet is based on a remark made by Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell, who said: "From out there on the moon, international politics look so petty. You want to grab a politician by the scruff of the neck and drag him a quarter of a million miles out and say, 'Look at that, you son of a bitch.'"

Day 84: After Seattle filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration, Portland follows suit and sues over withholding grants from sanctuary cities. Portland mayor Ted Wheeler tells the Oregonian: "Five years ago, I never would have envisioned myself suing a president of the United States on an issue that I believe is an issue of morality, and yet here we are. It's very important that we're taking this action."

Day 85: Hundreds of Jewish activists hold a Passover "Seder in the Streets" rally in New York City to call attention to the city's policing policies and to force Mayor Bill de Blasio to "give New Yorkers a real sanctuary city," in the words of a protester. Six were arrested.

Day 86: Dan Savage's ITMFA (Impeach the Motherfucker Already) raises $100,000 for the ACLU, Planned Parenthood, and the International Refugee Assistance Project. Also, people across the US take to the streets in support of the national Tax March movement. They demand to see Trump's tax returns and for the country to adopt a fairer tax system.

Day 87: We turn off push notifications from @RealDonaldTrump.

Day 88: Teen Vogue, a newly woke magazine in the age of Trump, reports that Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos's pick for acting head of the department's Office for Civil Rights, Candice Jackson, is not only a woman who once claimed that she was discriminated against because she is white but also "dismissed those who have accused Donald Trump of sexual violence as 'fake victims.'" She is a piece of work.

Day 89: Upstart Jon Ossoff nearly wins his House race in Georgia outright. He's just short, but he forces a run-off in June, giving Democrats another opening to flip the House.

Day 90: Another one bites the dust: Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), the "powerful" Republican congressman, announces he won't run for reelection in 2018. #Winning. Also: Bill O'Reilly gets fired from Fox News.

Day 91: After two hopeful political events, Democrats roll a fat blunt and celebrate on 4/20.

Day 92: Trump is still sucking at the polls with a 39 percent approval rating.

Day 93: Hundreds of thousands of people around the country fill the streets for the March for Science. Trump once called climate change a myth created by China.

Day 94: Badass writer Ijeoma Olou hosts "This Is What Resistance Looks Like" at Northwest Film Forum. Presenting "short films, political talks, and comedy with Seattle movers and shakers like mayoral candidate/activist/poet/boxer Nikkita Oliver and local-politics-related humorist Brett Hamil."

Day 95: California Democratic US representative Ted Lieu calls Attorney General Jeff Sessions a racist and a liar.

Day 96: After two California jurisdictions sue the Trump administration for withholding funds from sanctuary cities, a US District judge halts Trump's executive order blocking funding.

Day 97: "Let's Make America Gay Again!" is held at Coastal Kitchen. "Coastal Kitchen will join in the 'Decline to Sign' effort, which exhorts citizens not to support I-1552, a proposed initiative that would impose hardships on trans people trying to use public bathrooms."

Day 98: The Factory hosts a benefit for Planned Parenthood: "Stand with PP Poster Show" featuring "14 prints by artists who have depicted how the sexual-health organization benefits everyone."

Day 99: "SLAY: A Hiphop Party for LGBT+, POC, and Open-Minded People" is held at Chop Suey.

Day 100: Trump is impeached. (Not yet, but we won't stop trying.) recommended

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          Curtis Welling   

As the chief executive of AmeriCares, one of the planet's premiere philanthropies, Curtis Welling oversees the distribution every year of hundreds of millions of dollars worth of medical supplies and services to the poverty-stricken and war-torn pockets of the Third World, but also to poor Americans at clinics in the Unites States.

The 59-year-old Welling, who has been running the private nonprofit since 2002, is doing good after doing well, having spent a quarter century accumulating a fortune on Wall Street (and getting to know Bernie Madoff in the bargain).

"He was just a very hard-driving, successful, creative equity business guy," Welling told Portfolio.com about his former colleague in an exclusive interview from AmeriCares' Connecticut headquarters. "I never had any reason to question any of his business principles.... I suspect what happened here was he had a trading strategy that went bad fairly early on in the game, and he just kept trying to trade his way out of it and it got worse and worse and worse."

Lloyd Grove: Let me begin by wishing you a Merry Christmas and a happy holiday.

Curt Welling: Thank you very much and the same to you. It's obviously an interesting holiday season.

L.G.: It is. I'm looking at your annual report and year over year, 2007 to 2008, you had a pretty significant uptick in donations, mainly in-kind but also cash and securities. What's going to happen next year, given the financial meltdown?

C.W.: I guess I would say a couple of things. 2008 was a high-water mark year in many ways for us as you suggested, and the image of 2008 gets smaller and smaller in the rearview mirror with each passing day. I'm sort of looking at it fondly the way one looks at a quaint little town one's driven through as one heads down the road to some unknown but perhaps less hospitable destination.

L.G.: Watch out for that 18-wheeler overturned on the highway, Curt!

C.W.: Exactly. We don't know what the road's going to be like, don't know what the traffic's going to be like, and don't know what the weather's going to be like. The period we're in right now is obviously the period of maximum uncertainty. It's uncertain because we're in the transition to the new administration, because we're uncertain with respect to who the leadership is going to be in the new administration, we're uncertain what their policy priorities are going to be—we're uncertain about what the economic environment is going to be. And so we're reflecting that uncertainty in everything we're doing here to think about how we're going to deal with 2008. It seems to be a virtual certainty that charitable contributions and philanthropy will be down this year as they only have been a few times since the Depression, and everybody's wrestling with the question of how much. The problem that creates for us is that we're in the season when typically philanthropy would be at its peak for individuals. And, as you know, AmeriCares is entirely supported by private entities—individuals, foundations, and corporations. We don't take any money from the government, so our uncertainty is a little more complicated than some other people in our space.

L.G.: Do you think you'll be affected at all by the Bernie Madoff debacle?

C.W.: I think it's part of the frame, isn't it. I don't know of any particular donors to AmeriCares who have had their wealth managed by Bernie Madoff.


L.G.: "Managed." That's a very charitable term.

C.W.: Yeah. I know Bernie. In my previous incarnation, a long time ago, I had the opportunity to spend some time with him.

L.G.: Is that when you were working for that quaint little town called Bear Stearns?

C.W.: It was actually before that—that quaint little town called First Boston. And this is just incredibly sad on a whole bunch of levels. This is going to sound like a funny thing to say, he doesn't need any defense from me, but I don't think he started out to create a criminal enterprise. I think he's like a lot of people that find themselves doing something they shouldn't do, and rather than deal with the consequences at the beginning when they might be trivial, he tries to figure out a way to bury them, and make things right and it just gets out of hand. And obviously this got out of hand in a spectacular way, but I don't think there's anything that's going to affect AmeriCares particularly as a result of that. We didn't have any money with them. I'm sure there may be some of our donors that had money with them, but I doubt very many. So this is just another odd picture in what is becoming sort of an odd montage this year. And I don't think anybody has a lot of conviction of exactly where it's going to come out.

L.G.: You got to know him when you were at First Boston. Give me your sense of the guy, and in what capacity was First Boston doing business with him?

C.W.: I was running the equity business and he was running a very significant over-the-counter brokerage business. We worked in the same industry together, and his firm was well known to be one of the most aggressive and successful over-the-counter trading firms. He was very creative. He was actively involved in creating the Cincinnati Stock Exchange as an alternative execution venue to the New York Stock Exchange. There's a lot of inside baseball here, but there was a time when you could only trade New York Stock Exchange stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, so when people were looking for ways to make money, create different execution forums, Bernie was very creative in developing the Cincinnati Stock Exchange as an alternative, and he was just a very hard-driving, successful, creative equity business guy. I never had any reason to question any of his business principles. His
firm was very a reputable, stand-up firm to deal with and they were a very big player in the over-the-counter securities market.
 

L.G.: I'm not a sophisticated investor. I have a 401(k) that, I have to admit, when the envelopes come with the statements in them, I can't even bear to open the envelopes anymore.

C.W.: That shows good judgment actually. My advice to you would be you take the envelopes and don't open them for about a year to 18 months. Everything will be fine then.

L.G.: So explain to me how ostensibly smart, knowledgeable, sophisticated people, including people who put their money with Madoff, thought it reasonable that in all kinds of market conditions, they should be getting 8 to 9 to 15 percent returns on their money year after year without deviation.

C.W.: Of course, it's why people like fairy tales, because they make you feel good even though you know they're not true. There's a quality in the investment community which is sort of like the willing suspension of disbelief—that everybody wants to believe that someone's found the ability to repeal the laws of gravity. And so, when people
are ratified by the stature of other investors who preceded them, they suspend their disbelief and their critical faculties because they want to believe and because they're a little greedy, and they go along. This is a spectacular example of a story that's older than the hills. The same phenomenon, you may recall, happened maybe 10 to 12 years ago with an amazing fundraising Ponzi scheme that had swept up, among other people, several senior partners at Goldman Sachs. I think John Whitehead might've been on the board of this organization where some fellow whose name I've forgotten, went around to a bunch of very high-profile charities and said, "I've got a great, committed group of investors who are social philanthropists who want to be anonymous, so if you give me $100,000, I'll give you back you $100,000 and 25 percent interest on it in six months."

L.G.: And the guy wasn't even Nigerian, huh?

C.W.: No, no, exactly. And that's the classic, the same thing. You don't have to have all the money, you just have to have enough money so you can keep giving people back money when you promise it. That's what Bernie did. And I'm not sure but I suspect what happened here was, he had a trading strategy that went bad fairly early on in the game, and he just kept trying to trade his way out of it, and it got worse and worse and worse.

L.G.: What about the enforcement agencies? How can you explain the Securities and Exchange Commission's complete falling down on the job?

C.W.: Well, I think you explain it by a complete failure of responsibility and incompetence. It's stunning to me. As people investigate this story, you're going to start reading all kinds of things about the fact there were a lot of professional investors who had reason to believe this was not a sound investment firm for a long time, that there was sort of a suspicion in the sophisticated investment community. You're starting to hear some of these people come forward who had actually done the due diligence who had raised exactly the question you're raising, so that information is all out there.

L.G.: And some of them had gone to the S.E.C. and said "Hey, take a look at this."

C.W.: Exactly, as far back as 1999.

L.G.: And an enforcement official at the S.E.C. was somehow related to Bernie by marriage.

C.W.: I don't know the family relationship, but I'm sure in part, Bernie got a pass because he was a member of the board of the N.A.S.D. [National Association of Securities Dealers], and he was a big figure on Wall Street and so on and so on. Of course, this is one of the things that happens in a protracted period of a growth and economic prosperity, and it's a reminder that the S.E.C. exists not to be chummy with people in the business, it exists to make sure people are doing what they're supposed to be doing. I don't think there's any way of sugarcoating this. This appears to be a complete breakdown of responsibility and competence at the S.E.C.

L.G.: Do you feel like by getting out of the business when you did, in the early part of the century, that you perhaps dodged a bullet?

C.W.: Well, I'm not sure. I obviously have 25 years' worth of friends who are involved in all kinds of organizations that are going through all kinds of pain, or have gone through pain and are out of business, and I'm not sure I have any sort of existential conclusions about all that. I would say that I think at its core, the investment banking business—capital raising and providing advice to companies and governments—is a worthy business. And the vast majority of people that did it have values and morals and integrity and so on. There is a clear sense in which this thing sort of spun out of control. It happened over a period of time, it didn't happen over the last couple months. If you go back and you trace the history of real estate lending in the United States and the creation of the subprime lending industry, it was aided and abetted by many of the same congressmen who are now raising demagoguery to a new level, and certainly aided and abetted by government institutions and banks. And everybody sort of had their hands in this pot. I think the period from the late '90s to today was a period where a sense of value and balance and some core values was lost in some ways. I had a great 25 years in the industry, I met many of the people I'm closest to as friends during that period of time, but part of the reason why I and I think other people have looked and continue to look for things to do beyond the securities industry is I think there is, for a lot of people, sort of a spiritually and morally empty prosperity that characterized Wall Street.

L.G.: Did you not believe in the tenet "Greed is good"?

C.W.: [Laughs] I'll give you two perspectives on that. "Greed" is obviously a pejorative word, but the more ennobling characterization of that is "initiative and aspiration to create prosperity for ones' self and ones' family," which is another way of characterizing greed, and it is what drives the fundamental free-enterprise system in an economic democracy. So the inherent human quality to aspire to be better off and to have one's family be better off is something I think is not only good but we rely on it in our form of government. The problem is that it needs to be bounded. Unfortunately the '90s and the first part of this century was a period in which we took down all the bumpers and the barriers and had this sort of slavish mantra that the market knows best. Well, the market doesn't know best. The market needs to be policed. The market does a spectacular job of allocating capital through a price-discovery mechanism, and it relies on the self interest and the aspirations—or the greed, if you will—of individuals to do that. But it needs limits and it needs boundaries, and all the people who were supposed to be maintaining the boundaries took the boundaries down. Then people did what people do when they don't have any boundaries.
 
L.G.: You once told a reporter, "There were no people more self-important than investment bankers, including me." What does that mean?

C.W.: I do recall saying it, and I think it's true. I'm not sure I would say today there are no people more self-important. I think there is occasionally the politician and the corporate executive that rises to that level. But this is the Michael Lewis observation that when you take relatively young people and you expose them to the perquisites that one normally associates with wealth and power, and you give them amounts of money which by any other social perspective are the result of either a lifelong pursuit of something or inherent wealth, then people become very self-important. It's the old story about the guy who wakes up on third base and assumes he hit a triple. There are an awful lot of people in the securities industry that got swept up with this rising tide, and somehow believed that they'd earned it or they'd done something to deserve it or that it meant they were somehow superior or more insightful. One of the things that is a particularly poignant element of the contraction of Wall Street is a lot of these people were swept up into a position where they didn't acquire any transferable skills. And it's a long step from that step down to the next step, where they actually have to go compete in the real marketplace to do something that someone will pay them a wage for. I'm not sure I'm ready to conclude that the industry is going to become humble.

L.G.: Perish the thought!

C.W.: A lot of the self-importance has been washed away with the multiple houses and the planes and those kinds of things. You know, Lloyd, you could've made a small fortune, perhaps a large fortune, if you had said 12 months ago that by the end of 2008 there would be no major American investment bank left in existence, which is the case. We have only bank holding companies.

L.G.: Tell a complete ignoramus how I would've acted upon that to make my large fortune?

C.W.: Well, first of all you could've bet on it economically through any number of ways, but you would've become a celebrity savant. That would've been like saying, "I guarantee there will be a cure for cancer in 2008." It was inconceivable that firms like Lehman Brothers, Bear Stearns, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley would either go out of business or would become bank holding companies. Just inconceivable. It's still very hard for people to process, and I think it's hard for those organizations. You're seeing this in the aftermath of this October debacle. They're still sort of groping for modus operandi in this new, more-regulated, less-leveraged environment, which presents a completely different set of economic opportunities.

L.G.:
So at this point you don't envision AmeriCares as setting up free clinics for former Lehman Brothers employees?

C.W.: No, but if a Lehman Brothers employee without work, and without health insurance or was part of the working poor community in Connecticut, presented himself to our Norwalk or our Bridgeport or Danbury clinic, we'd give them the same quality of healthcare which we give to anyone else—and it's a very high quality indeed.

L.G.: Excellent. Tell me—at one point after you left your last position in business, and you were 51 years old, you were quoted somewhere as saying you were going to be working on polishing your golf game.

C.W.: That didn't last very long, as you'd well understand if you'd seen my golf game.

L.G.: You obviously made a decision that you'd made your fortune and that you were going to do something else. You were involved in your church. Tell me a little bit about your own process in terms of getting involved with AmeriCares.

C.W.: The seeds of this go back quite a while. I grew up in Rochester, New York, which is up on Lake Ontario and is certainly a more Midwestern community than it is a Northeastern community. And my parents and the people in our church and the people that we associated with had the old-fashioned value of community orientation and so on—the idea of being involved and the idea of philanthropy at some level. We didn't use that highfalutin term, it was just giving money to people who needed it. It was something that was always present in our family, so that was a fairly natural thing. So when I got to New York after graduate school, in fairly short order I began looking around for something to be involved in, became involved in a number of nonprofit organizations, one of which I'd chaired for 10 years, which is Spence Chapin, a spectacular adoption and child-service organization. I remember at one point, probably in the early '80s—I'd been pretty successful at First Boston at that point—I was up at Spence Chapin and we were doing some strategic work on setting up an adoption think tank. I went back to work thinking, Gee it would be fun to do this kind of thing full-time, and that was the first time I had the conscious thought that maybe at some point in the future, that would be a fun thing to do. That notion stayed with me and became more concrete as time went by, and I've said to a couple of people, everyone has a life list, whether it's well-defined and explicit or not, things you want to do. They made a movie out of this, with Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson.

L.G.: The Bucket List.

C.W.: The thing about having the list is you have to start doing the things or you have to cross them off. So when I left Société Générale, where I was responsible for their investment banking activities in the Americas. I think that is when I made that observation about polishing my golf game, and I was sort of thinking about what to do next, and I was seduced by the internet like a lot of other people at that time and went to run this wonderful bill-payments company in New Jersey. Then after September 11th, when the world turned upside down, I stepped back and said well, you've got to make another conscious decision of what to do. If you're serious about this, you either ought to pursue it or you ought to cross it off your list. So I started to do the discernment and the networking, the investigation one needs to do to make that kind of continental shift in career and focus, and through a wonderfully serendipitous process about a year later, I found AmeriCares and was fortunate enough to be offered this job.

L.G.: It's obviously a charitable organization. It has an amazing ratio of overhead versus money to actual services. I think you're under 2 percent or something like that.

C.W.: Just under 2 percent goes to overhead and the rest goes straight into the field.
 
L.G.: But explain to people who think of charitable organizations a certain way, why the C.E.O. of a charitable organization should be making $300,000 or whatever your last paycheck was. I saw $275,000 quoted in one story.

C.W.: That's right. That's the salary I got when I came here, and that's been my salary for the entire time I've been here. I think that the answer to that is pretty straightforward actually. Charitable organizations, whether they're churches or universities or humanitarian-aid organizations, need quality leadership in order to be well run and to be successful and to be good stewards of the money they get. And there's a marketplace for people who do that, there's a standard of compensation in that marketplace, and if you want to have a high-quality team in any organization, whether it's profit or nonprofit, you need to pay people what the market is for people to do what they do best.

L.G.: You mentioned that you were not quite clear on what the policies of the incoming administration are going to be. What are you not clear on? What would you like to have defined that would help you out in deciding where to allocate your resources?

C.W.: I'm not sure it'll have as much impact on us directly, because, like I said, we don't take any money from the government.

L.G.: Right, but presumably if they're doing something, you don't need to be terribly redundant, if they're taking care of an area you might otherwise feel compelled to fund.

C.W.: That's one aspect of it. The bigger aspect is that most of the large humanitarian-aid organizations in this country, from the American Red Cross to CARE to Save The Children and so on, get somewhere between 30 to 70 percent of their money from the U.S. government. So they're very concerned about what the foreign assistance priorities, policies, and budget allocation in the new administration will be. We're concerned more from the perspective of what's the playing field going to look like, what are their priorities going to be, how much money are they going to be devoting to areas like global health, what is their universal health-insurance program really going to be, that will be relevant to our free clinic program here in the United States, and what's their approach to the economy going to be? We're really much more dependent on the prosperity of individuals and corporations than lots of organizations, and so we have a vested interest in having tax policy be favorable to philanthropy, for example. We have a vested interest in having tax policy not be confiscatory to people that have wealth in the sense that the biggest individual philanthropists are the people who have accumulated the most wealth. Those are all things we're concerned about and interested in. What I meant by the uncertainty of policy priorities is we've got a lot of campaign rhetoric, but right now in the reality, where you're confronted with a trillion-dollar federal budget deficit and the worst economic situation since the Great Depression and I think the most complex economic situation in the history of the republic, there are going to be all kinds of unintended, unforeseeable effects on all kinds of entities. And certainly the not-for-profit world is going to be affected dramatically, foreign assistance of not-for-profit is going to be affected too. There is this uncertainty, and it will gradually resolve itself. I think the president-elect is doing a good job in managing the transition. I think he's done a good job in honoring his commitment to focus on competence rather than traditional politics. But being president of the United States is a political job, so he can't be completely free from that. The biggest uncertainty we're going to deal with in the next two months is fundraising. This is the time of the year when American charities raise 50 to 70 percent of their money. So we're spending a lot of time here coming up with contingency plans for what we'll do if our fundraising is down anywhere from 5 to 25 percent relative to last year.

L.G.: It seems like the bulk of your fundraising is in-kind contributions of goods and services.

C.W.: That's correct. The value proposition, the leverage in our operations, comes from the fact that AmeriCares is the world's largest recipient of quality donated medicines and medical supplies from all the world's great pharmaceutical and medical-supply companies. We have very good relationships with you-name-a-company and the odds are that they're a donor to us. And so we raise cash to allow us to deliver those medicines, medical supplies, and other health-oriented relief supplies to needy communities around the world and increasingly even in the United States.

L.G.: I see that about 20 percent of your work, delivery of services, is domestically in the United States.

C.W.: That's right, and that's actually been a program which has been growing in the last couple years. And we think we'll grow significantly in 2009, obviously subject to the overall economic climate. But the combination of the magnitude of the uninsured population and the consequences of the economic downturn have put very much greater demand on safety-net suppliers of health services. So free clinics, federally qualified clinics, so-called safety-net clinics that provide either no-cost or very-low-cost primary care to individuals as an alternative to going out into the emergency room. And we are supplying medicines and medical supplies to over 100 of those clinics in more than 30 states last year, and we expect there to be more demand for that this year.

L.G.: So you think that the domestic part of your mission will increase relative to the other parts?

C.W.: You know, it's the sad reality of the context in which we work, which is quite different than the for-profit world. If you're in the for-profit world, you spend all your time trying to figure out a product, and how you go capture a demand for your product. Here in a world where there are somewhere between 2 to 3 billion people that don't have access to medicine, the demand for what we do is essentially infinite. So, yes, I think we will do more in the United States, and whether that will be more relative to what we do outside the United States depends on how big the overall pie is. We're resource-constrained, based on that amount of cash donations we get as well as the amount of donated medicine we get.

L.G.: Do you raise money outside the United States?

C.W.: We do, but not very much. We don't have a staff which is focused other than anecdotally on people outside the United States.

L.G.: And it might be more difficult this time to shake down Prince Alwaleed bin Talal.

C.W.: Yeah, there was a lot more discussion about international philanthropy and generosity at 150 bucks a barrel than there is at 40 bucks a barrel. But, as you probably have seen, we opened earlier this year our first integrated program office outside the United States in Mumbai, India. We did that for a couple reasons. One is, India has become a very important site of manufacturing of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies, and it's located in such a way that strategically it allows us to get assistance to a part of the world which is very tough for us to get to from here economically. We'll be spending a lot of time trying to figure out how to raise money from wealthy individuals, companies, and foundations in India, but 98 percent of the money we raise, or maybe a little bit more, comes from the United States.
 
L.G.: How much of your time is allocated to raising money versus checking up on programs and administering the programs of AmeriCares?

C.W.: Right now it's a little higher percentage. As a general matter I probably spend one third to a half of my time either raising money or speaking with both corporate donors and individual donors, cultivating them and so on, and the rest of my time I would divide between sort of general management kinds of things and policy and strategy work.

L.G.: Are you on the road a lot going to far-flung places where AmeriCares is doing its work?

C.W.: Yeah, I probably travel to international locations half a dozen times a year. Just a few weeks ago I was in Indonesia and India, and then last week I was in El Salvador. I've got the plan that's coming in the New Year to be in Sri Lanka, again in India, probably a couple trips to Africa.

L.G.: You have some stuff going on in Darfur, do you not?

C.W.: We do. We've done now 11 airlifts of planes full of medicines, to supply the essential medicine requirements of the refugee camps in the three regions of Darfur. Darfur is, sadly, one of those things that the Western world pays attention to when it can afford to. I first flew there on the first airlift that we did in 2004, when I and most of the rest of the people in developed countries really didn't have any idea where Darfur was, and I remember having learned quite a lot about it. And I was flying in a plane of about 15 tons of medicine, and I remember thinking this is a horrific thing, but at least now that the world has focused on it, in the post-Rwanda environment where everybody says "never again," at least now that people are focused on it this will get solved relatively quickly. That was more than 100 tons and 10 airlifts ago, four years ago.

L.G.: Do you have any idea that because this incoming president has such a unique relationship with Africa that the situation might change?

C.W.: Well I think this is apropos of the conversation we were having earlier about a little bit of uncertainty. This is a good example. I think he has the potential to redefine in an important way the nature of the foreign policy relationship between the United States and Africa in a way that would be important for the United States and for Africa. Where that will rank on his priority list, which list also needs to include oh, Iraq, Afghanistan, China, Pakistan, India, the Middle East, and on and on, remains to be seen. There's a limit to the amount of power that the United States could project, just a practical limit, both financial and logistical. And there's a limit to the financial power that the United States can project at this time, and there's also a span of control set of issues. So I would like to see the president set engagement with the African Union as a high priority and set the resolution of Darfur as a high priority, as a signal of what the new relationship could be. I'd like to see that on political grounds but most importantly on humanitarian grounds. Whether that's something that will be on the list or not remains to be seen. This is going to sound like an odd analogy, but Darfur shares the willing suspension of disbelief that the Bernie Madoff situation share